CACINA

Advent Reflections Wed and Thurs of the 4th Week of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 23, 2022

Wednesday of the Fourth Week of Advent

Readings: Song of Songs – Chapter 2 verses 8-14 or Zephaniah – Chapter 3 verses 14-18a / Psalm 33 verses 2-3, 11-12, 20-21 / Luke – Chapter 1 verses 39-45

Gospel:

Mary set out in those days
and traveled to the hill country in haste
to a town of Judah,
where she entered the house of Zechariah
and greeted Elizabeth. 
When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting,
the infant leaped in her womb,
and Elizabeth, filled with the Holy Spirit,
cried out in a loud voice and said,
“Most blessed are you among women,
and blessed is the fruit of your womb. 
And how does this happen to me,
that the mother of my Lord should come to me? 
For at the moment the sound of your greeting reached my ears,
the infant in my womb leaped for joy. 
Blessed are you who believed
that what was spoken to you by the Lord
would be fulfilled.”

Reflection:

Friends, sometimes when we travel, we look to ascend to the mountain top. Challenging ourselves to do good and be good. We look hard at ourselves and strive to be a better version of ourselves. In what we have done and seek to be changed for, we have to be present in the moment. We no longer need to look at the past to see who we were but live in the now for who we can become. We should savor the moment, savor the journey. When we reach our milestones in life, when God unveils so much to us and our spirits become tuned to God, we can really bring Gods presence to those we encounter as our God is present to us. We than begin to see, speak, and feel with the very spirit of God.

“The Lord is coming – always coming.  When you have ears to hear and eyes to see you will recognize him at any moment of your life.  Life is Advent – life is recognizing the coming of the Lord.” 

                               Henri Nouwen

Thursday of the Fourth Week of Advent

Readings: 1 Samuel – Chapter 1 verses 24-28 / Psalm meditation 1 Samuel – Chapter 2 verses 1, 4-8abcd / Luke – Chapter 1 verses 46-56

Gospel:

Mary said:

    “My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord;
        my spirit rejoices in God my savior.
        for he has looked upon his lowly servant.
    From this day all generations will call me blessed:
        the Almighty has done great things for me,
        and holy is his Name.
        He has mercy on those who fear him
        in every generation.
    He has shown the strength of his arm,
        and has scattered the proud in their conceit.
    He has cast down the mighty from their thrones
        and has lifted up the lowly.
    He has filled the hungry with good things,
        and the rich he has sent away empty.
    He has come to the help of his servant Israel
        for he remembered his promise of mercy,
        the promise he made to our fathers,
        to Abraham and his children forever.”

Mary remained with Elizabeth about three months
and then returned to her home.

Reflection:

Friends, we must remember that our God never forsakes us. God never leaves us alone. God is continually walking with us.  You may feel God is sometimes distant at times, but our God continually is with us, in us and showering us with love, but we are not aware of it. It is all about trust.  

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

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Advent Reflections Mon and Tues of the 4th Week of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 23, 2022

Monday of the Fourth Week of Advent

Readings: Judges – Chapter 13 verses 2-7, 24-25A / Psalm 71 verses 3-4A, 5-AB, 16-17 / Luke – Chapter 1 verses 5-25

Gospel:

In the days of Herod, King of Judea,
there was a priest named Zechariah
of the priestly division of Abijah;
his wife was from the daughters of Aaron,
and her name was Elizabeth. 
Both were righteous in the eyes of God,
observing all the commandments
and ordinances of the Lord blamelessly. 
But they had no child, because Elizabeth was barren
and both were advanced in years. 

Once when he was serving as priest
in his division’s turn before God,
according to the practice of the priestly service,
he was chosen by lot
to enter the sanctuary of the Lord to burn incense. 
Then, when the whole assembly of the people was praying outside
at the hour of the incense offering,
the angel of the Lord appeared to him,
standing at the right of the altar of incense. 
Zechariah was troubled by what he saw, and fear came upon him. 

But the angel said to him, “Do not be afraid, Zechariah,
because your prayer has been heard. 
Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son,
and you shall name him John. 
And you will have joy and gladness,
and many will rejoice at his birth,
for he will be great in the sight of the Lord. 
He will drink neither wine nor strong drink. 
He will be filled with the Holy Spirit even from his mother’s womb,
and he will turn many of the children of Israel
to the Lord their God. 
He will go before him in the spirit and power of Elijah
to turn the hearts of fathers toward children
and the disobedient to the understanding of the righteous,
to prepare a people fit for the Lord.” 

Then Zechariah said to the angel,
“How shall I know this? 
For I am an old man, and my wife is advanced in years.” 
And the angel said to him in reply,
“I am Gabriel, who stand before God.
I was sent to speak to you and to announce to you this good news. 
But now you will be speechless and unable to talk
until the day these things take place,
because you did not believe my words,
which will be fulfilled at their proper time.”
Meanwhile the people were waiting for Zechariah
and were amazed that he stayed so long in the sanctuary. 
But when he came out, he was unable to speak to them,
and they realized that he had seen a vision in the sanctuary. 
He was gesturing to them but remained mute.

Then, when his days of ministry were completed, he went home. 

After this time his wife Elizabeth conceived,
and she went into seclusion for five months, saying,
“So has the Lord done for me at a time when he has seen fit
to take away my disgrace before others.”

Reflection:

Friends, God wants to shower us with so much that it can’t be described in words. It is similar to us who have been parents or reared children that you know you want to give so much to them that all that you wish to do, may have some limits, but you want to do it all, as best as you can. God wants so much to do the same and more for each one of us. It can’t be explained, and it doesn’t need to. All that we need to know and do, is to be free and willingly to accept the gifts that God gives to us.

Think back to when God gifted you with something that you know that God was definitely involved. How did you respond to it? Did you receive it humbly with great care? What did you do with that gift? How were you able to share it with others? Or did you keep it for yourself?

Tuesday of the Fourth Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 7 verses 10-14 / Psalm 24 verses 1-2, 3-4ab, 5-6 / Luke – Chapter 1 verses 26-38

Gospel:

In the sixth month,
the angel Gabriel was sent from God
to a town of Galilee called Nazareth,
to a virgin betrothed to a man named Joseph,
of the house of David,
and the virgin’s name was Mary.
And coming to her, he said,
“Hail, full of grace! The Lord is with you.”
But she was greatly troubled at what was said
and pondered what sort of greeting this might be.
Then the angel said to her,
“Do not be afraid, Mary,
for you have found favor with God.
Behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son,
and you shall name him Jesus.
He will be great and will be called Son of the Most High,
and the Lord God will give him the throne of David his father,
and he will rule over the house of Jacob forever,
and of his Kingdom there will be no end.”

But Mary said to the angel,
“How can this be,
since I have no relations with a man?”
And the angel said to her in reply,
“The Holy Spirit will come upon you,
and the power of the Most High will overshadow you.
Therefore the child to be born
will be called holy, the Son of God.
And behold, Elizabeth, your relative,
has also conceived a son in her old age,
and this is the sixth month for her who was called barren;
for nothing will be impossible for God.”

Mary said, “Behold, I am the handmaid of the Lord.
May it be done to me according to your word.”
Then the angel departed from her.

Reflection:

The gift of the presence of an angel is a strong manifestation of God. When we respond with awe it doesn’t require much. Only for us to be open to the surprise that is unfolding right in front of us. This gift of presence is the splendor and awe of it that something new and different is about to happen. No matter how many times the encounter, it is always a visit from and with God. The divine presence is working in our midst, allowing God to work, manifesting God’s self in the Spirit to reveal this and more.

When we allow people to come into our lives, we not only share a bond with each other, we invite God into it in the name of Jesus. When we allow this to take place, we open ourselves to grace upon grace, not only for ourselves and the others we gather with, but also for our world.  

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

Advent Reflections Thurs Fri Sat of the Third Week of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 17, 2022

Thursday of the Third Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 54 verses 1-10 / Psalm 30 verses 2 and 4-6, 11-12a and 13b / Luke – Chapter 7 verses 24-30

Gospel:

When the messengers of John the Baptist had left,
Jesus began to speak to the crowds about John. 
“What did you go out to the desert to see  a reed swayed by the wind? 
Then what did you go out to see? 
Someone dressed in fine garments? 
Those who dress luxuriously and live sumptuously
are found in royal palaces. 
Then what did you go out to see? 
A prophet? Yes, I tell you, and more than a prophet. 
This is the one about whom Scripture says:

    Behold, I am sending my messenger ahead of you,
    he will prepare your way before you.

I tell you,
among those born of women, no one is greater than John;
yet the least in the Kingdom of God is greater than he.”
(All the people who listened, including the tax collectors,
who were baptized with the baptism of John,
acknowledged the righteousness of God;
but the Pharisees and scholars of the law,
who were not baptized by him,
rejected the plan of God for themselves.

Reflection:

What do people see when they meet us? What would it be that we would like them to see? When people meet us, do we put on airs and pretend to be someone or something that we are not? What do people see?

When people meet me, I would hope that people see a genuine person filled with hope of one who wants to love as Jesus loved. I want to be to others as God is for me, for us. Eternal happiness and bliss for my fellow sisters and brothers who live a non-judgmental life who gives unconditional love that gives the glory to God. I  work on giving up my ego and not feed all that does not serve me and God. I work on living in the now in the present moment and not trying to live in the past and the future that has gone or has not come yet. How I live in this life gives me an indication on how I will live in the next. By accepting God’s plan for my life gives me the blessed assurance that I am cooperating with God and God with me.

Friday of the Third Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 56 verses 1-3a, 6-8 / Psalm 67 verses 2-3, 5, 7-8 / John – Chapter 5 verses 33-36

Gospel:

Jesus said to the Jews:
“You sent emissaries to John, and he testified to the truth.
I do not accept testimony from a human being,
but I say this so that you may be saved.
John was a burning and shining lamp,
and for a while you were content to rejoice in his light.
But I have testimony greater than John’s.
The works that the Father gave me to accomplish,
these works that I perform testify on my behalf
that the Father has sent me.”

Reflection:

When the prophets foretold the coming of Jesus and the ones who came after Jesus lived his message of love, have and will people continue to believe them? Who are the ones in our lives who are prophets?  Have we listened to them? How about the prophets, God used to speak to us? Do we recall the times when those ordinary persons in our lives are the prophets speaking God’s word to us? Who are the ones who we look to who have helped us to see with spiritual eyes? Have you or I been a prophet bearing God’s love and healing to those we encounter?

Saturday of the Third Week of Advent

Readings: Genesis – Chapter 49 verses 2, 8-10 / Psalm 72 verses 1-2, 3-4ab, 7-8, 17 / Matthew – Chapter 1 verses 1-17

Gospel:

The book of the genealogy of Jesus Christ,
the son of David, the son of Abraham.

Abraham became the father of Isaac,
Isaac the father of Jacob,
Jacob the father of Judah and his brothers. 
Judah became the father of Perez and Zerah,
whose mother was Tamar. 
Perez became the father of Hezron,
Hezron the father of Ram,
Ram the father of Amminadab. 
Amminadab became the father of Nahshon,
Nahshon the father of Salmon,
Salmon the father of Boaz,
whose mother was Rahab. 
Boaz became the father of Obed,
whose mother was Ruth. 
Obed became the father of Jesse,
Jesse the father of David the king.

David became the father of Solomon,
whose mother had been the wife of Uriah. 
Solomon became the father of Rehoboam,
Rehoboam the father of Abijah,
Abijah the father of Asaph. 
Asaph became the father of Jehoshaphat,
Jehoshaphat the father of Joram,
Joram the father of Uzziah. 
Uzziah became the father of Jotham,
Jotham the father of Ahaz,
Ahaz the father of Hezekiah. 
Hezekiah became the father of Manasseh,
Manasseh the father of Amos,
Amos the father of Josiah.
Josiah became the father of Jechoniah and his brothers
at the time of the Babylonian exile.

After the Babylonian exile,
Jechoniah became the father of Shealtiel,
Shealtiel the father of Zerubbabel,
Zerubbabel the father of Abiud. 
Abiud became the father of Eliakim,
Eliakim the father of Azor,
Azor the father of Zadok. 
Zadok became the father of Achim,
Achim the father of Eliud,
Eliud the father of Eleazar. 
Eleazar became the father of Matthan,
Matthan the father of Jacob,
Jacob the father of Joseph, the husband of Mary. 
Of her was born Jesus who is called the Christ.

Thus the total number of generations
from Abraham to David
is fourteen generations;
from David to the Babylonian exile, fourteen generations;
from the Babylonian exile to the Christ,
fourteen generations.

Reflection:

It is always said that you don’t choose the family you are born into. We may think we have not picked the family we are in, but I believe before we were born, God gave us a choice and we picked our family for a reason we will know when we return to God. If we think back from our beginnings to the present, the journeys we are on, we can see the members of our families in the happiest of times and in the saddest of times. We can see the members of our families who have made an impact on the family within and without. We can see the ones who have strived to keep the family together and those for whatever reason have left the family.  And did you know, like Jesus we too have a mission to fulfill in our lifetime?  Are we ready like Mary to say YES?

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

Advent Reflection Wed of the 3rd Wk of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 16, 2022

Memorial of Saint John of the Cross, Priest and Doctor of the Church

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 45 verses 6C-8, 18, 21C-25  / Psalm 85 verses 9AB and 10-14 / Luke – Chapter 7 verses 18B-23

Memorial of Saint John of the Cross, priest and doctor of the Church

Readings: 1 Corinthians – Chapter 2 verses 1-10a / Psalm 37 verses 3-6, 30-31 / Luke – Chapter 14 verses 25-33

Gospel:

At that time,
John summoned two of his disciples and sent them to the Lord to ask,
“Are you the one who is to come, or should we look for another?” 
When the men came to the Lord, they said,
“John the Baptist has sent us to you to ask,
‘Are you the one who is to come, or should we look for another?’”
At that time Jesus cured many of their diseases, sufferings, and evil spirits;
he also granted sight to many who were blind. 
And Jesus said to them in reply,
“Go and tell John what you have seen and heard:
the blind regain their sight,
the lame walk,
lepers are cleansed,
the deaf hear, the dead are raised,
the poor have the good news proclaimed to them. 
And blessed is the one who takes no offense at me.”

Reflection:

Based on 3rd Sunday of Advent

Here we are the third Sunday of advent already. I am very aware of time.  It goes so fast and we are so WORRIED trying to get Things  done for Christmas.  That is not what god is saying to us TODAY. 

Isaiah said “BE STRONG, FEAR NOT, HERE IS YOUR GOD COMING TO SAVE YOU” and James enforces it by saying, “be patient like a farmer who plants the seed and wait for it to grow”. 

And of course, as human beings we ask, “ save us from what?”

Wait!  No we do not want to wait. We forget what this season is about and are totally in the human mode full of stress and complain we want everything done yesterday and blame each other and judge ourselves and others and actually can’t wait for it to be over.

Advent is not only about preparing our hearts, our spirits, our minds and yes our bodies about the birth of our Lord, but mostly about reminding us that Our Lord is birthed within us every day of the year.

John the Baptist was trying to tell the people then to be aware that God is ever in our midst.  And today the message is still the same God is here now and we are so afraid of this message because we will be challenged to change how we go about our daily lives.  

We are so comfortable in how things are and consider ourselves, “good and doing good”.

No way do we want to become aware of the fact that God is being birthed each day within me and yes you.  It is scary because it means like I said we are being called to change our perceptions every day.

Why are we so afraid to see God in ourselves and in those who do not look like or fit into our way of life. For instance the homeless, the addict, the emotionally disturbed alien, the person who knows how to push our buttons, and the list goes on.

I don’t know about you, but I must take the blinkers off and overcome my fear and see God where I do not want to look.  I cannot do it alone. It takes two to do this, yes, I have to want to, then I have to allow God to show me in God’s gentle way how to experience this incredible awareness of God being in everyone and everything. 

Of course, being human, it is not an easy decision we all like “COMFORTABLE”, and it takes a lot of letting go of how we think God should be and an openness of who and where  God really is.

God in reality is my friend, my constant companion, even though I ignore this most of the time.  God knows every speck about me, and I don’t want to believe that God loves me just the way I am no matter what I do or have done.  We are being called to experience this gift of joy. Joy is the substance and ingredient of our soul. 

Why am I so afraid to drop what is so comfortable for what can be an amazing encounter with our God?

When we open our hearts and allow ourselves to see and believe that God is all present, all knowing and all powerful, it is then the Joy floods in.  Remember Joy does not mean happy, it is knowing with our spiritual eyes that our God is ever with preparing and there with us in our daily journey of love of rebirth in the good, and the bad.

Are we ready to take this leap of faith?     AMEN

Reverend Honey Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

Advent Reflections Monday & Tuesday 3rd Week of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 16, 2022

Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe

Readings: Zechariah – Chapter 2 verses 14-17 or Revelation – Chapter 11 verse 19a; Chapter 12 verses 1-6a, 10ab / Psalm (Judith – Chapter 13 verses 18BCDE, 19)  / Luke – Chapter 1 verses 26-38

Gospel:

The angel Gabriel was sent from God
to a town of Galilee called Nazareth,
to a virgin betrothed to a man named Joseph,
of the house of David,
and the virgin’s name was Mary.
And coming to her, he said,
“Hail, full of grace! The Lord is with you.”
But she was greatly troubled at what was said
and pondered what sort of greeting this might be.
Then the angel said to her,
“Do not be afraid, Mary,
for you have found favor with God.
Behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son,
and you shall name him Jesus.
He will be great and will be called Son of the Most High,
and the Lord God will give him the throne of David his father,
and he will rule over the house of Jacob forever,
and of his Kingdom there will be no end.”
But Mary said to the angel,
“How can this be,
since I have no relations with a man?”
And the angel said to her in reply,
“The Holy Spirit will come upon you,
and the power of the Most High will overshadow you.
Therefore the child to be born
will be called holy, the Son of God.
And behold, Elizabeth, your relative,
has also conceived a son in her old age,
and this is the sixth month for her who was called barren;
for nothing will be impossible for God.”
Mary said, “Behold, I am the handmaid of the Lord.
May it be done to me according to your word.”
Then the angel departed from her.

Reflection:

Sisters and brothers, the way the angel greeted Mary- full of grace, we too should greet each other, with the most profound respect as our God does to us  each and every morning. When we wake up in the morning opening our eyes, we should give a profound greeting to God, and not only to God , but to all creation. When we do this, we are doing exactly what the angel did for and to Mary.

God gives us the grace to wake up each day and give God the glory. Glory to God, in all creation, and in ourselves. The gift of grace that calls us to be children of God enables us to be co-creators in all that exist. What God has given to us so freely, we ought to give to each other. The gift of grace honoring the spirit of God in each and every one of us. By this we know that God is within us.  

Memorial of Saint Lucy, Virgin and Martyr

Readings: Zephaniah – Chapter 3 verses 1-2, 9-13  / Psalm 34 verses 2-3, 6-7, 17-18, 19 & 23 / Matthew – Chapter 21 verses 28-32

Memorial of Saint Lucy, virgin and martyr

Readings: 2 Corinthians – Chapter 10 verses 17B – Chapter 11 verse 2  / Psalm 31 verses 3cd-4, 6 and 8ab, 16bc and 17 / Matthew – Chapter 25 verses 1-13

Gospel:

Jesus said to the chief priests and the elders of the people:
“What is your opinion? 
A man had two sons. 
He came to the first and said,
‘Son, go out and work in the vineyard today.’ 
The son said in reply, ‘I will not,’
but afterwards he changed his mind and went. 
The man came to the other son and gave the same order. 
He said in reply, ‘Yes, sir,’ but did not go. 
Which of the two did his father’s will?” 
They answered, “The first.” 
Jesus said to them, “Amen, I say to you,
tax collectors and prostitutes
are entering the Kingdom of God before you. 
When John came to you in the way of righteousness,
you did not believe him;
but tax collectors and prostitutes did. 
Yet even when you saw that,
you did not later change your minds and believe him.”

Reflection:

Friends, we have to remember that we will not always get second chances in life. When opportunities avail themselves to us, even when we are hesitant and doubtful, we should know that second chances are not guaranteed to us. After careful prayer and consideration if decisions must be made, the time to show God’s love is now.

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

Advent Reflections Fri and Sat 2nd Week of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 11, 2022

Friday of the Second Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 48 verses 17-19 / Psalm 1 verses 1-4, and 6 / Matthew – Chapter 11 verses 16-19

Reading for the Optional Memorial of Saint Juan Diego Cuauhtlatoatzin

Readings: 1 Corinthians – Chapter 1 verses 26-31 / Psalm 131 verses 1bcde, 2, 3 / Matthew – Chapter 11 verses 25-30

Gospel:

Jesus said to the crowds:
“To what shall I compare this generation? 
It is like children who sit in marketplaces and call to one another,
‘We played the flute for you, but you did not dance,
we sang a dirge, but you did not mourn.’ 
For John came neither eating nor drinking, and they said,
‘He is possessed by a demon.’ 
The Son of Man came eating and drinking and they said,
‘Look, he is a glutton and a drunkard,
a friend of tax collectors and sinners.’ 
But wisdom is vindicated by her works.”

Reflection:

Friends in our interactions with our fellow brothers and sisters we have to be mindful that God always has our backs. In our present days there are times when we  are taken advantage of or mistaken for who and what we stand for. Sometimes we look for vindication. We want to feel heard and believed. Whether we feel that we are right in certain situations and want others to know how right we are, we miss the boat. We don’t have to defend ourselves. When trying to do so it actually makes us more guilty by stressing ourselves out trying to prove ourselves right.  Who do we need to prove ourselves to? Who do we need to let know, how right we are? Everything that happens to us doesn’t always need an explanation and we don’t need to always be right. The only one who can really vindicate us is God.

Saturday of the Second Week of Advent

Readings: Sirach – Chapter 48 verses 1-4, 9-11 / Psalm 80 verses 2ac and 3b, 15-16, 18-19 / Matthew – Chapter 17 verses 9a, 10-13

Gospel:

As they were coming down from the mountain,
the disciples asked Jesus,
“Why do the scribes say that Elijah must come first?”
He said in reply, “Elijah will indeed come and restore all things;
but I tell you that Elijah has already come,
and they did not recognize him but did to him whatever they pleased. 
So also, will the Son of Man suffer at their hands.”
Then the disciples understood
that he was speaking to them of John the Baptist.

Reflection:

Friends, again, we can’t take for granted those whose presence is in our midst. We can easily miss the signs of kinship right in front of us. We have to know that in those intimate close chance encounters, it is God speaking to us. As Jesus knew the invitations were given and it is for us to respond accordingly to what has been presented to us. It is opportunity that God continually gives us to improve ourselves and others. It is our chance to always give rise to hope for humanity and our world. We can look for the prophets, but God is saying that we too are prophets that need to be the presence of Christ in our world.

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

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Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway DriveSouth Burlington, Vermont 05403

Advent Reflections Wed and Thurs 2nd Week of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 11, 2022

Memorial of Sint Ambrose, Bishop and Doctor of the Church

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 40 verses 25-31 / Psalm 103 verses 1-4, 8 and 10  / Matthew – Chapter 11 verses 28-30

Memorial of Saint Ambrose, bishop and Doctor of the Church

Readings: Ephesians – Chapter 3 verses 8-12 / Psalm 89 verses 2-5, 21-22, 25 and 27  / John – Chapter 10 verses 11-16

Gospel:

Jesus said to the crowds:
“Come to me, all you who labor and are burdened,
and I will give you rest.
Take my yoke upon you and learn from me,
for I am meek and humble of heart;
and you will find rest for yourselves.
For my yoke is easy, and my burden light.”

Reflection:

Friends, Jesus reminds us to lay all of our burdens on God. When we think we can go at it alone, we will not be successful in our journey. To get to the end of whatever it is that we are suffering, we are going to have to go through it. What helps sustains us through that burden is knowing that God suffers with us. We sometimes seek help and guidance from those whom we trust, which is good for us to do. In addition, if we allow God to work through us and accompany us on our journey, then we are all the better for it.  God and I are an overwhelming majority. With God on my side, on our side makes a great difference. Going at it alone takes a lot out of us. Through prayer and meditation, support from God and loved ones, then to me that is half the battle.

Solemnity of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Readings: Genesis – Chapter 3 verses 9-15, 20 / Psalm 98 verses 1, 2-3ab, 3cd-4  / Ephesians – Chapter 1 verses 3-6, 11-12 / Luke – Chapter 1 verses 26-38

Gospel:

The angel Gabriel was sent from God
to a town of Galilee called Nazareth,
to a virgin betrothed to a man named Joseph,
of the house of David,
and the virgin’s name was Mary.
And coming to her, he said,
“Hail, full of grace! The Lord is with you.”
But she was greatly troubled at what was said
and pondered what sort of greeting this might be.
Then the angel said to her,
“Do not be afraid, Mary,
for you have found favor with God.
Behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son,
and you shall name him Jesus.
He will be great and will be called Son of the Most High,
and the Lord God will give him the throne of David his father,
and he will rule over the house of Jacob forever,
and of his Kingdom there will be no end.”
But Mary said to the angel,
“How can this be,
since I have no relations with a man?”
And the angel said to her in reply,
“The Holy Spirit will come upon you,
and the power of the Most High will overshadow you.
Therefore the child to be born
will be called holy, the Son of God.
And behold, Elizabeth, your relative,
has also conceived a son in her old age,
and this is the sixth month for her who was called barren;
for nothing will be impossible for God.”
Mary said, “Behold, I am the handmaid of the Lord.
May it be done to me according to your word.”
Then the angel departed from her.

Reflection:

Sisters and brothers, the way the angel greeted Mary- full of grace, we too should greet each other, with the most profound respect as our God does to us  each and every morning. When we wake up in the morning opening our eyes, we should give a profound greeting to God, and not only to God , but to all creation. When we do this, we are doing exactly what the angel did for and to Mary.

God gives us the grace to wake up each day and give God the glory. Glory to God, in all creation, and in ourselves. The gift of grace that calls us to be children of God enables us to be co-creators in all that exist. What God has given to us so freely, we ought to give to each other. The gift of grace honoring the spirit of God in each and everyone of us. By this we know that God is within us.  

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

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Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

Advent Reflections for the 2nd Week of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 10, 2022

Monday of the Second Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 35 verses 1-10 / Psalm 85 verses 9ab and 10-14  / Luke – Chapter 5 verses 17-26

Gospel:

One day as Jesus was teaching, Pharisees and teachers of the law, who had come from every village of Galilee and Judea and Jerusalem, were sitting there, and the power of the Lord was with him for healing. And some men brought on a stretcher a man who was paralyzed; they were trying to bring him in and set him in his presence. But not finding a way to bring him in because of the crowd, they went up on the roof and lowered him on the stretcher through the tiles into the middle in front of Jesus. When Jesus saw their faith, he said, “As for you, your sins are forgiven.” 

Then the scribes and Pharisees began to ask themselves,
“Who is this who speaks blasphemies? 
Who but God alone can forgive sins?” 
Jesus knew their thoughts and said to them in reply,
“What are you thinking in your hearts? 
Which is easier, to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’
or to say, ‘Rise and walk’? 
But that you may know
that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins”–
he said to the one who was paralyzed,
“I say to you, rise, pick up your stretcher, and go home.” 

He stood up immediately before them,
picked up what he had been lying on,
and went home, glorifying God. 
Then astonishment seized them all and they glorified God,
and, struck with awe, they said,
“We have seen incredible things today.”

Reflection:

Friends, we have to be mindful in how we address people. Our words, thoughts, deeds, and actions can have a positive or negative effect on people. This does not mean that when we are honest with people that we can’t be, even when it can momentarily be painful for the receiver to hear it. But our words that can be said to uplift a person or it can used to bring a person or group of people down.

We can destroy a person or uplift them in the appropriate manner. It is as if, when we give in to certain emotions when we are directly involved can cause devastation and wreak havoc to gratify our own desires only to later regret what was said because we were only thinking about ourselves.

Friends, we have the power to uplift those around us, all those we encounter, to help minister to enable others to realize their own potential and worth to extend the same to others where we all build up the kin-dom for all humanity.

Tuesday of the Second Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 40 verses 1-11 / Psalm 96 verses 1-3, and 10ac, 11-13  / Matthew – Chapter 18 verses 12-14

Optional Memorial of Saint Nicholas, bishop

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 6 verses 1-8 / Psalm 40 verses 2 and 4, 7-8a, 8b-11  / Luke – Chapter 10 verses 1-9

Gospel:

Jesus said to his disciples:
“What is your opinion?
If a man has a hundred sheep and one of them goes astray,
will he not leave the ninety-nine in the hills
and go in search of the stray?
And if he finds it, amen, I say to you, he rejoices more over it
than over the ninety-nine that did not stray.
In just the same way, it is not the will of your heavenly Father
that one of these little ones be lost.”

Reflection:

Friends,  we know that our God wants to be so close and intimate with all that God has created. When anyone of us suffers, we all suffer. When we suffer or are lost, in pain living in uncertainty, our God is as well , right alongside us. Bidden or not bidden, God is always there. God suffers with us. God understands our pain and tries as any other person would to comfort them in their suffering.

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

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Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

2nd Week of Advent Reflection

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 4, 2022

We are being led!

Friends, ever wonder at times in your life when you might have felt out of place as if you did not belong or fit in ? Ever feel so far removed from those in whose presence you are in that it might have felt like while all were on earth, you were on the moon? Well, that was how John the Baptist was seen. He was out of place of sorts, and he was definitely not always liked or appreciated because he would really force people to be honest and true to themselves. The Pharisees and Sadducees would instruct the people in following the law as if they were the only ones who know the proper way to follow God.

John had a message. The people came to hear John. John’s message of course was about preparing oneself for the coming messiah. But before one could receive the message, one truly had to come to terms with any outstanding debt that needed to be paid. I mean to make amends not only with people but within us. The debt needs to be paid. Paid back in full.

John showed that in order for us to be honest with God and others, we need to be honest with ourselves first. The message John brings is that when we come to clear our conscience and turn from our former ways even remotely and cannot be partial about it, we have to come with full hearts wanting and needing change.

It is not enough for us to want to feel good, but we have to want to be good. Not enough to know we must change; we have to want to change.

John shows us that there has to be a time in our lives, be it sooner than later that we have to confront our obstacles in the journey as we strive for complete wholeness. John shows us that we need to be accountable ourselves. We need to be accountable to God.

That accountability not only to ourselves but to each other in order for us to confess, we must first profess, sustaining our truth, the truth of God. Once we find our footing, we will see the planted roots of ourselves, our labors and begin to see ourselves in the otherness of life.

That otherness is to come to that peace that lies still and deep inside of us. The peace that knows surpasses understanding where we just let go of all our ideas, opinions, and assumptions. The humility that sets in allows me to change not only my mind, but also my heart and spirit. To go beyond wisdom that is not my own.

We bring ourselves to the present moment seeking to be part of the new creation of life. We bring our lives into sync with God’s authority, God’s rule, and God’s love. In our practice we strive for this newness to be healed, restored, and born again. We trust in the way God is leading us. We only need to accept it, and act on it. 

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

Advent Reflections

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 3, 2022

Friday of the First Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 29 verses 17-24 / Psalm 27 verses 1, 4, 13-14 / Matthew – Chapter 9 verses 27-31

Gospel:

As Jesus passed by, two blind men followed him, crying out,
“Son of David, have pity on us!” 
When he entered the house,
the blind men approached him and Jesus said to them,
“Do you believe that I can do this?” 
“Yes, Lord,” they said to him. 
Then he touched their eyes and said,
“Let it be done for you according to your faith.” 
And their eyes were opened. 
Jesus warned them sternly,
“See that no one knows about this.” 
But they went out and spread word of him through all that land.

Reflection:

When we cry out to God, we should know that God hears us and responds to us. We may sometimes think that God does not respond to us, but God does. God responds to us in all our needs, day and night, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. When God responds, God responds the best way that God can and does. It is up to us to know that God responds in ways that God sees best for us. God responds in God’s own time and in God’s own way. We should not try to anticipate trying to figure out if God took care of our needs. We rest in the loving promise and gaze of a God who so patiently watches over God’s children waiting as a patient parent waiting for the love that God can share with us. God wants us to always know that God loves us. Can we love ourselves and God with eyes of faith? If we live in hope, we most certainly can.

Memorial of Saint Francis Xavier, Priest

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 30 verses 19-21, 23-26 / Psalm 147 verses 1-6 / Matthew – Chapter 9 verses 35- Chapter 10 verses 1, 5A, 6-8

Readings for the Memorial of Saint Francis Xavier, priest: 1 Corinthians – Chapter 9 verses 16-19, 22-23 / Psalm 117 verse 1bc, 2 / Mark – Chapter 16 verses 15-20

Gospel:

Jesus went around to all the towns and villages,
teaching in their synagogues,
proclaiming the Gospel of the Kingdom,
and curing every disease and illness. 
At the sight of the crowds, his heart was moved with pity for them
because they were troubled and abandoned,
like sheep without a shepherd.
Then he said to his disciples,
“The harvest is abundant, but the laborers are few;
so ask the master of the harvest
to send out laborers for his harvest.” 

Then he summoned his Twelve disciples
and gave them authority over unclean spirits to drive them out
and to cure every disease and every illness. 

Jesus sent out these Twelve after instructing them thus,
“Go to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. 
As you go, make this proclamation: ‘The Kingdom of heaven is at hand.’ 
Cure the sick, raise the dead,
cleanse lepers, drive out demons.
Without cost you have received; without cost you are to give.”

Reflection:

One of my favorite psalms is Psalm 8. The words by the psalmist suggest that God has invited us to be co-heirs with God. This does not mean that we are greater than God, but that God has invited us, given us an invitation to share in this great gift of life, of creation. When we are invited to a wedding or a special family or friend event, our loved ones and friends want us to share with them in their celebration. The RSVP card must be filled out. We must answer the call and respond promptly. We may need some time, or we may send it back quickly. As our God knows no time and puts no due date on our answer to God’s request, nevertheless, the invitation has been given. The same way Jesus shares with God, we too share in this great calling. The only thing we have to do is respond. No stamp required. Return postage is already guaranteed.

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

Advent Reflections

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on December 1, 2022

Feast of Saint Andrew, Apostle

Readings: Romans – Chapter 10 verses 9-18 / Psalm 19 verses 8-11 / Matthew – Chapter 4 verses 18-22

Gospel:

As Jesus was walking by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers,
Simon who is called Peter, and his brother Andrew, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen. He said to them, “Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.” At once they left their nets and followed him. He walked along from there and saw two other brothers, James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John. They were in a boat, with their father Zebedee, mending their nets. He called them, and immediately they left their boat and their father and followed him.

Reflection:

Sisters and brothers, we are being called each and every day by our God to say ‘yes’ responding to the needs of those all around us. We must respond to the needs of our world, the needs of our times. What are the needs? The needs are ever   evolving. The needs are  compassion, non-judgment, kindness, and love for a world that still tries to find its place in it all. The struggles we go through, no matter what they are, are always an opportunity for us to respond to a world crying out for sustainability. Not only for our planet, but for its inhabitants as well.  For ourselves!

It’s not our reaction to it, but our response. Our response is our action, by our example is how we respond. We live our lives according to the One who has called us forth to bear fruit in the world by the way we live. The seeds have been planted, it is only for us to cultivate and join in the benefits that come from it giving glory to God. We do this in the example of Jesus.

The same way that Jesus called Andrew and the others, God invites us to do the same.

Thursday of the First Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 26 verses 1-6 / Psalm 118 verses 1, 8-9, 19-21, 25-27a / Matthew – Chapter 7 verses 21, 24-27

Gospel:

Jesus said to his disciples:
“Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’
will enter the Kingdom of heaven,
but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven.

“Everyone who listens to these words of mine and acts on them
will be like a wise man who built his house on rock. 
The rain fell, the floods came,
and the winds blew and buffeted the house. 
But it did not collapse; it had been set solidly on rock. 
And everyone who listens to these words of mine
but does not act on them
will be like a fool who built his house on sand. 
The rain fell, the floods came,
and the winds blew and buffeted the house. 
And it collapsed and was completely ruined.”

Reflection:

Friends, we must answer the call and bring the people with us. The call is there, but are we thinking we have to do it alone? God is calling us to bring others with us on the journey, have we? Who is it that we carry or bring along the journey? It is our responsibility to oneself and others as we live this kin-dom living that God has opened our hearts to. It isn’t about proselytizing, forcing people to see it our way through our faith tradition but by our hope in our humanity, in one another. Once we can see things together with spiritual eyes, the eyes of love, we are free because it doesn’t become only about us but the other.

We don’t do this alone. Jesus did not send anyone out on their own, but by two’s.  We will face trials and tribulations. They may be small storms or big hurricanes. The important thing is to remember and know that we don’t walk this path alone. Others are with us, and God is with us leading the way. Together, it makes us an overwhelming majority.

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

Monday and Tuesday of the First Week of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on November 29, 2022

Monday of the First Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 4 verses 2-6 / Psalm 112 verses 1-3, 4bcd, 5-9, / Matthew – Chapter 8 verses 5-11

Gospel:

When Jesus entered Capernaum,
a centurion approached him and appealed to him, saying,
“Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, suffering dreadfully.”  
He said to him, “I will come and cure him.”  
The centurion said in reply,
“Lord, I am not worthy to have you enter under my roof;
only say the word and my servant will be healed.
For I too am a man subject to authority,
with soldiers subject to me.
And I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes;
and to another, ‘Come here,’ and he comes;
and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.”
When Jesus heard this, he was amazed and said to those following him,
“Amen, I say to you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith.
I say to you, many will come from the east and the west,
and will recline with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
at the banquet in the Kingdom of heaven.”

Reflection:

Sisters and brothers, what happens to us when we find ourselves subject to authority? Do we find ourselves subject to someone else? A spouse, supervisor, a friend? If we are subject to someone else, are we treated well enough, respected, and appreciated? Are our ideas, gifts and talents allowed to be shared? Or those we are subject to, are our relationships one of pressure and control? When authority is exhibited in all its forms, either for the good or the bad, we have to be mindful that that this too is our will. We must be careful when we unexpectedly give up our own will for someone else’s control over us. We are in control of our being. Our true nature belongs to God and us, no one else. When we are in relationships with our spouses, it is shared, but done in a healthy way to keep our individuality and commitment to ourselves and others. God gives us freedom and requires nothing back in return. The only invitation given is that we can accept a great love that has been given to us. We simply have to give it back, if we choose. The choice is ours. Love to be loved in return from the ultimate lover and giver.

Tuesday of the First Week of Advent

Readings: Isaiah – Chapter 11 verses 1-10 / Psalm 72 verses 1-2, 7-8, 12-13, 17 / Luke – Chapter 10 verses 21-24

Gospel:

Jesus rejoiced in the Holy Spirit and said,
“I give you praise, Father, Lord of heaven and earth,
for although you have hidden these things
from the wise and the learned
you have revealed them to the childlike. 
Yes, Father, such has been your gracious will. 
All things have been handed over to me by my Father. 
No one knows who the Son is except the Father,
and who the Father is except the Son
and anyone to whom the Son wishes to reveal him.”

Turning to the disciples in private he said,
“Blessed are the eyes that see what you see. 
For I say to you,
many prophets and kings desired to see what you see,
but did not see it,
and to hear what you hear, but did not hear it.”

Reflection:

Sisters and brothers, Jesus speaks about not only getting to know God better but by getting to know who we are better in order to free ourselves to love God without any hindrance or worldly distractions.

Jesus speaks about getting back to the root cause of it all. Ourselves! It was so much easier as a child, not because we were spoon fed the beginning of our faith, but it was easier to see the divine all around us. As a child we only know truth, beauty, and innocence. It becomes easier to see the things around us with fresh new eyes. We see things from the perspective of an innocent baby. We have to reconnect with the child, the baby within us to recognize the Divine not only within ourselves but within each one of us.

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

First Sunday of Advent

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on November 29, 2022

First Sunday of Advent

Why are we here?

Friends, as we have come out of the season of ordinary time, we have been hearing readings from the Gospels, the book of Revelation about the end times. We are reminded to prepare, be on watch, we do not know the day or the hour. Prepare? Watch out for what? Is Jesus telling us that maybe this thing called time is very precious and that we should take it very seriously. It reminds me of St. Benedict instructs the monks to always keep in mind this may be our last day. If we do this, it forces us to come face to face with all things. We waste too much time on unimportant things and don’t give the appropriate time to the things that really matter.

Jesus is saying it is time to see what it is that really matters? What really matters is to know that we can always see the light even when at times it seems to be bleak & dark. When we break through this and not allow the darkness to engulf us, that is the challenge during this advent season.

This is what Advent is all about waiting and all the things that happen in between. We are reminded that we are  pregnant like Mary with the birth of love. Everything is included with it. Our pregnancy becomes the ultimate disruption in life. When we come out of ourselves becoming kind and loving, it takes a certain sense of humility and vulnerability as Henry Nouwen reminds us. It all becomes about otherness.

By remembering that the home of God is to be in us and within God’s creation. The new Jerusalem already came down to earth.

We hear about the ones left behind and get the impression they were punished, but were they left to hear the word and do the work? What does it mean for us?

In this current time and place, now, we are being called to follow Christ to be the Face of God to all we meet. When we place ourselves in God, it is a celebration. It is God and us in ministry right now, together. We operate in our own time; God’s presence is evident. God makes a home here. What God invites us is to see with eyes of empathy and compassion, as Jesus did, and see who is hungry and  feed them. Who is rejected and welcomes them, and the list goes on. We don’t have to be perfect, and we don’t have to go anywhere to find who needs to be loved, God is guiding us.

Advent is the waiting for the coming of Christ, we know that Christ already is here but, in another sense, it is the second advent which is the second coming of Christ where the whole world becomes one in Him.

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

FIND THE DIVINE IN THE ORDINARY

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on November 12, 2022

Check out our newsletter from the CACINA Catholic Parish of St. Benedict. Blessings!

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Reflections

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on October 28, 2022

Feast of Saints Simon and Jude

Readings: Ephesians – Chapter 2 verses 19-22 / Psalm – 19 verses 2-5

/  Luke – Chapter 6 verses 12-16

Gospel:

Jesus went up to the mountain to pray,
and he spent the night in prayer to God.

When day came, he called his disciples to himself,
and from them he chose Twelve, whom he also named Apostles:
Simon, whom he named Peter, and his brother Andrew,
James, John, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew,
Thomas, James the son of Alphaeus,
Simon who was called a Zealot,
and Judas the son of James,
and Judas Iscariot, who became a traitor.

Reflection:

Friends, we must remember that we belong to a large family of faith. We are all counted among

the tribes of Israel. We are all sisters and brothers in the God who loves us all so dearly. We have all been called and all of us are among all of humanity who are called to simply be there as best as we can possibly be for each other.

Its all about relationship. The relations we have with each other which forces us to be in right relationship everyone we have encountered. If we strive to be in right relationship with God, why is it hard to be in relationship with each other?

God calls us to God’s self. We only have to respond as who we are, not how we think others want us to be. We must believe that we are worthy of that calling because we are all part of God’s creation, not one of us is less than the other.

Saturday of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

Readings: Philippians – Chapter 1 verses 18-26 / Psalm – 42 verses 2-3, 5

/  Luke – Chapter 14 verses 1, 7-11

Gospel:

On a sabbath Jesus went to dine
at the home of one of the leading Pharisees,
and the people there were observing him carefully.

He told a parable to those who had been invited,
noticing how they were choosing the places of honor at the table.
“When you are invited by someone to a wedding banquet,
do not recline at table in the place of honor.
A more distinguished guest than you may have been invited by him,
and the host who invited both of you may approach you and say,
‘Give your place to this man,’
and then you would proceed with embarrassment
to take the lowest place.
Rather, when you are invited, 
go and take the lowest place
so that when the host comes to you he may say,
‘My friend, move up to a higher position.’
Then you will enjoy the esteem of your companions at the table.
For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled,
but the one who humbles himself will be exalted.”

Reflection:

Friends, I am reminded of one thing and one thing only. It is all about humility. It is not about putting myself as the lowest of the low and not needing to elevate myself where I need to pump my chest. It is about being humble and compassionate. We are not alone, and we have to bring all that we are and all that we have to our great God. We are not alone, and we cannot do it alone. If we realize that from the beginning of our journey, then we will be all for the better. As St. Benedict says in the Rule of St. Benedict we are as lowly as the worms. Our life is not our own. It has been a great gift given to us by God. We are to use our gifts and talents for the service of God and for each other. If I leave my ego behind me and not let it walk in front of me then I do not have to let it control me, I have nothing to think or worry about.

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403

Reflections

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on October 28, 2022

Wednesday of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

Readings: Ephesians – Chapter 6 verses 1-9 / Psalm – 145 verses 10-14

/  Luke – Chapter 13 verses 22-30

Gospel:

Jesus passed through towns and villages,
teaching as he went and making his way to Jerusalem.
Someone asked him,
“Lord, will only a few people be saved?”
He answered them,
“Strive to enter through the narrow gate,
for many, I tell you, will attempt to enter
but will not be strong enough.
After the master of the house has arisen and locked the door,
then will you stand outside knocking and saying,
‘Lord, open the door for us.’
He will say to you in reply,
‘I do not know where you are from.’
And you will say,
‘We ate and drank in your company and you taught in our streets.’
Then he will say to you,
‘I do not know where you are from.
Depart from me, all you evildoers!’
And there will be wailing and grinding of teeth
when you see Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob
and all the prophets in the Kingdom of God
and you yourselves cast out.
And people will come from the east and the west
and from the north and the south
and will recline at table in the Kingdom of God.
For behold, some are last who will be first,
and some are first who will be last.”

Reflection:

Friends, we have to be careful when we make assumptions. We make assumptions about others and  ourselves. We believe what we believe whether its true or not and if not true, we go into denial.  Our God makes no assumptions on us, so why should we do it to others. We cannot judge and when our assumptions and judging become apparent, we are embarrassed and regret even going there.

If we are true to ourselves, in our divine calling, and say to ourselves that it is not solely about me but us, then we will know that we are following God’s will. When we allow God to be God instead of our own versions of what we make and believe God is, then we can recline at the table of God.

Thursday of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

Readings: Ephesians – Chapter 6 verses 10-20 / Psalm – 144 verses 1-2, 9-10

/  Luke – Chapter 13 verses 31-35

Gospel:

Some Pharisees came to Jesus and said,
“Go away, leave this area because Herod wants to kill you.”
He replied, “Go and tell that fox,
‘Behold, I cast out demons and I perform healings today and tomorrow,
and on the third day I accomplish my purpose.
Yet I must continue on my way today, tomorrow, and the following day,
for it is impossible that a prophet should die
outside of Jerusalem.’

“Jerusalem, Jerusalem,
you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you,
how many times I yearned to gather your children together
as a hen gathers her brood under her wings,
but you were unwilling!
Behold, your house will be abandoned.
But I tell you, you will not see me until the time comes when you say,
Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.”

Reflection:

Friends, we must be mindful of when fear is looming and that we do not succumb to that fear. When we face the struggles and trials in our lives, if we can always remember that God is walking next to us side by side. God is holding our hands, if we let God do it. If we give up our control in trying to run things our own way in how we perceive it, by letting God guide us, we become all the better for it.

Bishop Michael Theogene

Co-Pastor

The CACINA Catholic Parish of Saint Benedict &

Abbot of the Benedictines of Peace and Justice

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

Please feel free to share, like, subscribe, comment, and post any content that you see on our CACINA and individual CACINA community’s social media pages. 

Please help us spread the word of God through the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2022, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Michael Ellis, Chancellor

175 Fairway Drive

South Burlington, Vermont 05403