CACINA

Firgive again ang again

Posted in homily by frtonys on August 13, 2020

Learning to forgive those who have hurt us is probably one of the greatest challenges in life. Peter’s question to Jesus as the beginning of the gospel comes of out that sense of how difficult it is to forgive someone, ‘How often must I forgive my brother?’ The implication of his question is that there has to be a limit to forgiveness.

Peter decides seven times would be often enough. In the biblical culture of the time, seven was considered to be the complete number. To forgive seven times is complete forgiveness. Yet, Jesus says not seven times, but seventy seven times. There is to be no limit to our willingness to forgive.

Jesus underpins this very challenging call with the parable that he tells. In that parable the servant owes his master ten thousand talents. This was a massive sum of money, equivalent to billions of dollars today. It simply could never be paid back. In the parable the master felt so sorry for his servant that he simply cancelled the debt completely.

Here is an image of the gracious and generous way that God deals with us. Jesus reveals a God whose mercy triumphs over justice. The remainder of the parable in today’s gospel tells us that we must allow the mercy that God freely pours into our lives to flow through us to touch others. This is what the servant who was forgiven failed to do. One of the sayings of Jesus expresses the message of today’s parable very succinctly, ‘Be merciful as your Father is merciful.’

Posted in homily by frtonys on August 12, 2020

Today’s gospel Jesus reminds that disciples of Jesus, We are both individuals with a personal relationship with the Lord Jesus and also a members of a community of believers.  We must take responsibility for my own missteps (sins), also we can seek the help of others.  We need to have a proper balance between personal responsibility and community involvement. 

There are times on the journey of faith when We myst go itbalone and move forward  At other times, We will be traveling as part of caravan, who may have to help us travel the next step, just as We must be willing to help others on their journey.  We need to be able to rely on the discernment of other faith-filled companions to help me see the right path to take.  

This harmony between personal action and communal help is not always easy to do.  As part of a member of faith community which spans time and place, we can look to others who have walked the balance beam before us. 

Today let’s take the opportunity to reflect on our personal responsibility and relationship with the Lord Jesus and also our part in being members of a community of believers.  In the way we live our lives, may we join the psalm when it says, “From the rising to the setting of the sun is the name of the LORD to be praised.

Take a moment to reflect How have I taken personal responsibility for my own sinful failings?  What have I done to consciously seek to move in the right direction with God’s help?  Through my sins, how have I failed the faith community as we travel along together as pilgrim people?  What can I do to edify the faithful in giving praise to GOD from the rising to the setting of the sun?

St Clare of Assisi

Posted in homily by frvictorray on August 11, 2020

-Saint Clare of Assisi’s Story -feast day Aug 11th

One of the more sugary movies made about Francis of Assisi pictures Clare as a golden-haired beauty floating through sun-drenched fields, a sort of one-woman – to the new Franciscan Order.

The beginning of her religious life was indeed movie material. Having refused to marry at 15, Clare was moved by the dynamic preaching of Francis. He became her lifelong friend and spiritual guide.

At 18, Clare escaped from her father’s home one night, was met on the road by friars carrying torches, and in the poor little chapel called the Portiuncula received a rough woolen habit, exchanged her jeweled belt for a common rope with knots in it, and sacrificed her long tresses to Francis’ scissors. He placed her in a Benedictine convent, which her father and uncles immediately stormed in rage. Clare clung to the altar of the church, threw aside her veil to show her cropped hair, and remained adamant.

Sixteen days later her sister Agnes joined her. Others came. They lived a simple life of great poverty, austerity, and complete seclusion from the world, according to a Rule which Francis gave them as a Second Order. At age 21, Francis obliged Clare under obedience to accept the office of abbess, one she exercised until her death.

Poor Ladies went barefoot, slept on the ground, ate no meat, and observed almost complete silence. Later Clare, like Francis, persuaded her sisters to moderate this rigor: “Our bodies are not made of brass.” The greatest emphasis, of course, was on gospel poverty. They possessed no property, even in common, subsisting on daily contributions. When even the pope tried to persuade Clare to mitigate this practice, she showed her characteristic firmness: “I need to be absolved from my sins, but I do not wish to be absolved from the obligation of following Jesus Christ.”

Contemporary accounts glow with admiration of Clare’s life in the convent of San Damiano in Assisi. She served the sick and washed the feet of the begging nuns. She came from prayer, it was said, with her face so shining it dazzled those about her. She suffered a serious illness for the last 27 years of her life. Her influence was such that popes, cardinals, and bishops often came to consult her—Clare herself never left the walls of San Damiano.

Francis always remained her great friend and inspiration. Clare was always obedient to his will and to the great ideal of gospel life which he was making real.

A well-known story concerns her prayer and trust. Clare had the Blessed Sacrament placed on the walls of the convent when it faced attack by invading Saracens. “Does it please you, O God, to deliver into the hands of these beasts the defenseless children I have nourished with your love? I beseech you, dear Lord, protect these whom I am now unable to protect.” To her sisters, she said, “Don’t be afraid. Trust in Jesus.” The Saracens fled.

Reflection

The 41 years of Clare’s religious life are scenarios of sanctity: an indomitable resolve to lead the simple, literal gospel life as Francis taught her; courageous resistance to the ever-present pressure to dilute the ideal; a passion for poverty and humility; an ardent life of prayer; and a generous concern for her sisters.

the Franciscans of Ft. Lauderdale – CACINA

WWW.CACINA.ORG

You must be like little children

Posted in homily by frtonys on August 11, 2020

Jesus tells us that if we want to enter the Kingdom of Heaven we must turn and become like little children. So let’s ask ourselves, Who are little children?

Little children are those innocent people who are ready to be taught. They will sit patiently and listen to what you have to say. Jesus wants us to behave likewise towards Him and His teachings. Little children do not have preconceived opinions about something. They have no prejudice or bias towards a subject. Jesus tells us to accept Him, His teachings and His Kingdom as He teaches.

When you compare us grown-ups and little children, you will notice that grown-ups’ hearts, minds, bodies and souls have been tainted by this evil world. Grown-ups tend to think bad things about others as opposed to children who always have good thoughts about others.unless told by us grown-ups. They are very innocent and living this can be seen when they play together regardless of race, tribe, religion, social status etc..

So let’s change our behavior and become childlike so that we can be regarded as the greatest in the Kingdom of Heaven. Let us embrace humility, peace and love for one another and we will become like little children both in heart and soul.

Prayer: Lord Jesus Christ, we would like to become childlike so that we can enter Your Kingdom. Purify our hearts, thoughts and actions to become like those of little children and become the greatest in the Kingdom of Heaven. Amen.

A Reflection by Michael Ellis

Posted in inspirational by revmtheogene on August 10, 2020

 

If you would like to have a reflection considered for publication, please send your writing to Bp. Tony Green at revtonygreen@gmail.com

 

 

“No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God.”  Luke 9:62 (NIV)

Some time ago, a research study was completed that looked at the relationship between choice and satisfaction.  Fifty college students were given digital cameras and instructed to spend the next week taking 100 pictures.  Afterwards, the pictures were lifted from each camera and assigned to a file for each student.  The students were then given instructions to begin editing their pictures.  The first assignment was for each student to edit his or her file by permanently deleting half (fifty) of the pictures.  The second assignment was to eliminate another twenty-five.  There followed consecutive instructions to further edit their picture files to ten, five, and, finally, two.

At that point, the fifty students were randomly divided into two cohorts of twenty-five each.  All of the students were instructed to choose one of the two pictures that remained in each of their respective files.  This would become “their” picture, which would subsequently be transferred to print and framed for them, free of charge, as a reward for participating in the study.

But the study was not over yet.

In keeping with previous instructions, the first cohort of students was told that the picture they elected not to select as “their” picture would be permanently deleted.  By contrast, the second cohort was told that the picture they elected not to choose as “their” picture would be saved.  Further, the second cohort was told that if, at any time, a student changed his or her mind and wanted to exchange the picture they had originally chosen for the one they had rejected, they could do so, and it would duly be framed for them.

And this is where the study got really interesting.

The researchers subsequently polled all of the students about their satisfaction with their respective choice of pictures at one-week, one-month, and three-month intervals.  By an overwhelming margin, the students in the first cohort – the ones who were told that the picture they had not chosen would be permanently deleted – reported higher levels of satisfaction with their ultimate choice than did the second cohort, the ones effectively given an “out” by being allowed to change their mind.

What the researchers subsequently concluded was that multiplicity of choice correlates negatively with choice satisfaction:  in other words, commitment is an important aspect of contentment.

Jesus could have told them that.

What initially may sound like a harsh admonition from our Lord about “fitness” for the kingdom of God is really just Jesus understanding something about human nature.

The Christian life, conceptualized as a journey, is one that begins at some place and time for each of us. And in the course of that journey, we are sometimes – maybe even frequently – tempted to look back to old ways of thinking and behaving (decidedly non-Christian, or at least non-distinctively so) which are not only familiar, but also, for most of us, in very many ways, easier to square with “the real world.”

We doubt that the Christian life, this picture we’ve chosen to save and to live by, is really “our” picture, the one that best reflects who we really are.  Sometimes, in some places, the Christian life just doesn’t seem like a good “fit”.

Jesus understood this.

And that’s why Christian worship is so important.  Because in worship our attention is gathered and focused, over and over again, in the right direction:

          “my body, given for you . . .my blood, poured out for you.” 

In worship, we remember that the choice Jesus made for us was an irrevocable one.  No changing his mind.  No turning back.  God for us.  Forever.

And in worship we answer God’s commitment to us with our own, imperfect commitment to continue to follow Jesus, to be his body, his Church, in the world.

And, again, this is where it really gets interesting.

Because, over time, we begin to come into a new awareness about that picture we chose to keep and live by long ago: it really is our true likeness, the person each of us was created to be, and the only one that fits.

And we are satisfied with it.

Because God took it.

“Forgetting what lies behind and reaching forward to what lies ahead, I press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus.”  Phil: 3: 13-14 (NASB)

 

Michael Ellis (CACINA seminarian)

Diocese of the Little Portion

 

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Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Daily Mass Feast of Saint Lawrence Deacon and Martyr

Posted in church events by revmtheogene on August 10, 2020

Saint Jude the Apostle Mission – Home of the Presiding Bishop of CACINA Bishop Anthony Santore. Also assigned to St. Jude is Associate Pastor Father Joseph Reynolds, CACINA Chancellor and treasurer. St. Jude the Apostle is based in Oriental, North Carolina. (Pamlico County)   Facebook.com/ Saint Jude the Apostle Mission     Live streaming Mass daily at 9:00am

 

 

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Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

A Reflection by Fr Vincent Treglio OSF

Posted in inspirational by revmtheogene on August 10, 2020

Good morning, hope all had a good weekend. They say “something OLD”. Well, that is for today.
“Friends speaking to one another.”
“Try to speak of tenderness to the violent, of compassion to the selfish affluent.”
“Try to speak of love to armies on the march or of human love to the flesh-peddlers of our cities.”
“Do you really believe that Love overcomes all these evils? What kind of love is so strong?
“He looked at his friend and smiled. Yes, he said, and simply pointed to the Cross.”
(unknown)
Have a blessed day.
Peace and All Good
Fr. Vinnie, osf
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Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

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Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Feast of Saint Lawrence

Posted in homily by frtonys on August 10, 2020

Today we celebrate the feast of Saint Lawrence St Lawrence was one of the seven deacons of the 3rd century church in Rome and was martyred under the Emperor Valerian on the August 10th, 258. The prime reason for the choice of the Gospel text is that Lawrence became like the grain of wheat that was unafraid to fall into the ground and die. In doing so, he became like his Lord and master Jesus.

In today’s Gospel Jesus says, only when the grain of wheat dies in the muddy soil of the field does it become a seedling. In the same way, the Church would grow up and flourish in the death of its martyrs. “The blood of the martyrs is the seed of the Church.” When we die to our personal ambitions and desires, we are born as useful instruments in the hands of God. The second lesson is that only by spending life we can retain it. The world owes a lot to saintly people like St. Don Bosco, St. Vincent De Paul, St. Teresa of Calcutta (Mother Teresa), St. Jeanne Jugan, and St. Damien, among others, who spent their energy for service of the poor and the downtrodden and gave themselves to God. The third lesson is that greatness comes through selfless and committed service. This explains why the world still honors and cherishes the memory of great souls mentioned above.

Let us surrender our lives to God in the service of others with agápe love in all humility, seeing the face of Jesus in each of them.

Sunday Mass 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in church events by revmtheogene on August 9, 2020

Father Al Risdorfer is the Pastor of Our Lady UnDoer of Knots which is a CACINA parish  located at 1620 Reisterstown Road Pikesville, Maryland 21208 (Baltimore County) Our Lady UnDoer of Knots shares space at St. Mark’s On The Hill Episcopal Church.

 

 

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Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Sunday Mass 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in church events by revmtheogene on August 9, 2020

 

Saint Jude the Apostle Mission – Home of the Presiding Bishop of CACINA Bishop Anthony Santore. Also assigned to St. Jude is Associate Pastor Father Joseph Reynolds, CACINA Chancellor and treasurer. St. Jude the Apostle is based in Oriental, North Carolina. (Pamlico County)   Facebook.com/ Saint Jude the Apostle Mission     Live streaming Mass daily at 9:00am

 

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

 

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Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

A Reflection by Fr Vincent Treglio OSF

Posted in inspirational by revmtheogene on August 9, 2020

 

 

Hello. I’m back and trying to do as little typing as I can so I don’t move my shoulder too much. I’m coming along, it is MUCH better. Thank God!
On the 11th of Aug. we will celebrate the Feast of St. Clare of Assisi, Co-Patron of our parish. Because of that we will be celebrating her feast today at Mass.
At this time of so much sickness and we may feel we are not doing everything we would want or need to, Clair might help to put our minds at some peace.
“Our body is not made of iron. Our strength is not that of stone. Live and hope in the Lord, and let your service be according to reason.”
Happy Feast!!
St. Clare, pray for us.
Peace and All Good,
Fr. Vinnie, osf
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Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Homily 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in homily by revmtheogene on August 9, 2020

 

Readings: 1 Kings – Chapter 19 verses 9A, 11-13A  / Psalm 85 verses 9,10, 11-14 / Romans Chapter 9 verses 1-5 / Matthew – Chapter 14 verses 22-33 

 

Friends. What is it that we fear the most in our life? Why are we so afraid when we are presented with such great fears in our lives? I am sure, as it has happened in my life, that we get so full of fear that it paralyzes us, and we get stuck, frozen in a way unable to decide. We sometimes feel, as if we cannot move ahead and think that maybe it is better to stay right where we are.

When this happens, are we listening to God who may be prompting us to move forward? When I begin to isolate myself from others and from God,  I stay stuck where I am at

My friends, fear is sometimes a good thing as an early built in warning system to protect us from harm.  The fear I am talking about is the fear of facing insecurities and negative thoughts that paralyze us from growing as a person emotionally and spiritually. If we do not  accept the challenge to overcome our fear, we become cowards.

I realize that a hero is someone who is afraid of whatever is facing them but faces it head on, humbly asks for help  and is able to move forward.  Look at Jesus many times he was faced with fear, what did he do?

He accepted the challenge and in spite of whatever the consequences he  did not retreat or hide.

There is a saying F.E.A.R is false evidence appearing real.  Looking back at anything, I was afraid of was a monster to me before I faced it, and when I did face it was nothing that I could not handle.  In fact, it was the very thing that brought me closer to God.   Why do we think we have to do everything alone?   Jesus said, “I will be with you always”.   Not sometimes….always.   No matter how silly we may think a situation is, God is always with us, all we have to do is ask.  Do not forget God gave us free will so we have to ask for help.  Does our pride prevent us from asking?

Are we cowards or hero’s …………Our choice

(rev.) Michael

 

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Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Jesus will calm the chaos in your life

Posted in homily by frtonys on August 9, 2020

To the ancient people, the seas represented chaos.  Fishermen and sailors, then, as well as now, know all too well the sudden turmoil caused by rough waters.  If you ever saw the movie, The Perfect Storm, you would understand why the water is associated with chaos.  The sea hits us in the front, the back, the left and the right.  There is no escaping it when we are in the middle of it.  That is chaos. But God conquered the seas. And Jesus walked on the water.  He continues to walk on water.  He walks on the chaos of our lives.

Even if we fail, if we blink, and sink like Peter did. Don’t be afraid,” the Lord says.  He is there to reach down and lift us out of the water, out of the chaos, just as he lifted Peter out of the water, out of the chaos of his life.

The Lord knows that we are not saints, not yet anyway.  He knows that we are weak.  He accepted Peter, that loud lout, that well-meaning coward, and turned him into the Rock of the Church.  He takes us as we are and walks with us on the water. He only asks us to have the courage to put our faith in Him.  He gives us the strength to join Him in conquering the chaos.

Wherever that chaos is, please remember, that there is nothing, no chaos that is too great for Jesus to conquer. And there is nothing too devastating for us to conquer with Him.

A Reflection by Bishop Tony Green

Posted in inspirational by revmtheogene on August 8, 2020

 

Jesuit Priest Daniel Berrigan died in 2016.  He was a anti-war activist, playwright poet, and author. 

 

 

 

 

PRAYER FOR THE MORNING HEADLINES

By Daniel Berrigan

 

Mercifully grant peace in our days.  Through your help may we be freed from present distress.  Have mercy on women and children, homeless in foul weather, ranting like bees among gutted barns and stiles.  Have mercy on those (like us) clinging one to another under fire.  Have mercy on the dead, befouled, trodden like snow in hedges and thickets.  Have mercy, dead man, whose grandiose gentle hope died on wing, whose body stood like a tree between strike and fall, stood like a cripple on his wooden crutch.  We cry; Halt!  We cry; Password!  Dishonored heart, remember and remind, the open sesame: from there to here. From innocence to us: Hiroshima, Dresden, Guernica, Selma, Sharpeville, Coventry, Dachau, Vietnam, Afghanistan, Iraq.  Into our history, PASS!  Seed hope.  Flower peace.

Amen.

A Reflection by Mother Monica Kennedy

Posted in inspirational by revmtheogene on August 8, 2020

 

When asked to write about what makes me hopeful these days, my first thoughts dwelled on the qualities of people in the world that reflect the presence of God among us.  I mean the people that see in the dark.  I mean the capacity of people to see beyond the pain of a particular moment to be present to what matters most. The capacity for sacrifice that lives in human beings goes unacknowledged, at least in any deep sense, yet people everywhere, in families and human service, give of themselves routinely to loved ones and to strangers at great personal cost. Healthcare workers on the frontlines of the pandemic are best examples.

 

There are families like that of my friend Carrie, who made the decision to bring her mother-in-law home because of Covid-19 at the nursing home. Carrie has asthma and is high risk for the virus. She will be on edge for a while, providing special care for her mother-in-law while Carrie works from home.   But she and the family are making the sacrifice.  I have seen reports about families that have made loving decisions like these for elderly parents and in-laws.  Hearing these stories gives me faith and hope in the goodness of people. People who choose to guard and protect life bless us all.

 

I find hope in the authentic voices that manage to ring out clearly despite the processed truths and noise of our culture.  I hope in the generation of Greta Thunberg, who as a teenager has boldly proclaimed the existential crisis humankind faces in the problem of climate change.   I rejoice in humanist comics like Stephen Colbert, Trevor Noah and Lewis Black.  These voices have grounded hearts; these voices all speak truth to power.  (And when Stephen Colbert once referred to Lindsey Graham as “regret made flesh”, well, that was the moment I knew Colbert has a truly Catholic mind.)

 

Mtr. Monica Kennedy

St. Charles of Brazil Parish

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

 

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Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Saints

Posted in saints by revmtheogene on August 8, 2020

St. Dominic (1170–1221) was born in Spain to a family of noble lineage. His mother, Blessed Jane of Aza, prayed at the church of St. Dominic Silos to conceive a male child, her first two sons being given to the priesthood. In answer to her prayer, she dreamed that a dog leaped from her womb carrying a torch in its mouth which set the world ablaze. At his baptism, his godmother beheld a star shining from his forehead. As a child Dominic showed signs of great sanctity and intelligence, and he was also given to the Church for the priesthood. When famine struck Dominic sold his rare and expensive theology books to feed the poor. As a priest he traveled with his bishop into southern France and discovered that it had been overrun with a heretical movement which led many away from the Church. This inflamed his desire to devote his life to apostolic preaching for the salvation of souls, at the time an office reserved to bishops. With the Pope’s approval he founded the Order of Preachers, or the Dominicans, committed to defend the truth of the Catholic faith. St. Dominic’s Order was novel in that it combined the active and contemplative religious life with the labor of scholarly study and itinerant preaching. St. Dominic was innovative in meeting the needs of his time to defend the Church against her enemies. To aid his mission, Our Lady appeared to him and gave him a new devotion—the Holy Rosary. St. Dominic is the patron saint of scientists and astronomers. His feast day is August 8th.

 

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