CACINA

We have the duty and responsibility to continue their good works

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 28, 2020

Today we celebrate together the great Feast of the Apostles of Our Lord Jesus Christ, two of the Twelve Apostles, namely St. Simon and St. Jude. St. Simon was also known as Simon the Zealot, likely referring to his past as a member of the Zealots, the extremists who fought against the Romans at the time of Jesus. Meanwhile, St. Jude refers to St. Jude Thaddeus, who was sometimes connected with Jude, of the extended family of the Lord.

Both of them would go on to serve the Lord and reach out to the peoples of various nations, answering to the call of the Lord to evangelise to the nations. St. Simon the Apostle went to many places, often together with St. Jude the Apostle, which is why both of them are celebrated together today. Both of them had committed themselves to the Lord and converted many, establishing firm foundations of the Church in many places, and gave everything to the Lord, even their lives, for His sake.

We can rejoice in the memory of these two glorious Apostles of the Lord, that the Lord has showed His love so wonderfully towards us by giving us His love and salvation through all those whom He had called and chosen to be the bearers of His Good News.

However, we also have to recognise that we have the duty and responsibility to continue the good works of the Apostles and their successors, for just as they had dedicated themselves to God and passed on their faith to all those to whom they had ministered, we too have the same responsibility to be faithful witnesses of our Christian faith and proclaim the Lord’s Good News to all.

How do we do this, we live out our faith with sincerity and do what we truly believe in. If we do not act and do things in the manner that we have professed our faith, then our faith is no better than empty and meaningless.

It’s the little things done that grow the Kingdom ofGod

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 27, 2020

The two images Jesus tells today are about surprising potential. Each of them compares something very small to what it can become. A mustard seed is tiny but grows into a tree where birds can nest. A tiny piece of leaven transforms a whole basin of flour into rising dough.

The kingdom of God is like that, where very small things can grow to become very significant. Even our smallest acts of kindness can have a good effect beyond what we might imagine. Small acts of service can create an opening for the grace of God. It’s mistaken to think that unless our efforts are big and impressive they don’t really count for much. It is everyday kindness, small initiatives, things may go unnoticed, that contribute to building up the kingdom of God.

To cooperate with the loving plan of God, we must cherish the hidden mustard seed of divine grace in our lives. Like the woman who so kneads the yeast into the dough that it rises to fresh-baked bread, we must try to nurture ourselves and others , so that we can all enjoy the freedom and dignity of the children of God.

A day set aside to reconnect with God

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 26, 2020

In our Gospel today, we heard about the confrontation between the Lord Jesus and the Pharisees, who saw the Lord healing a woman who had been crippled for eighteen years. And the Lord healed her on the day of the Sabbath. We may think that there is no issue with this at all.

However, to the Pharisees and the teachers of the Law, rulers of the Synagogues, at that time, said what Jesus did was an aberration and travesty, tantamount to blasphemy, as they believed that the Sabbath day is a day when no activity of all sorts were allowed, regardless of circumstances p.

They rigidly interpreted and enforced the Law, that even as the Lord showed love and mercy to the suffering woman, they grumbled and were unhappy seeing what He has done before them and the people. They would rather that the woman suffered longer than to be flexible in their enforcement and application of the Law. They failed to understand and appreciate their faith properly.

The Law of God, as the Lord made it very clear, is not meant to oppress or make the people to suffer. The Law of God is meant for the people to rediscover their love and devotion to God. Through the Law, regulating the Sabbath, God wants us all to keep and devote some time, reminding us that He is the chief priority of our lives.

hrough His healing of the woman suffering for such a long time, the Lord in fact wanted to show them His wonderful love. He wanted us to recognise this love and learn to love Him more and more. And how do we do this, brothers and sisters? It is by living righteously and virtuously in accordance to His Law, dedicating ourselves, our time, attention and effort on Him.

May the Lord help each and every one of us to remain more faithful to Him, and may He bless each and every one of us in our every good endeavours from now on. May God bless us all at all times, and guide us in the journey of life. May God be with us, now and always. Amen

Sunday Mass 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in church events by revmtheogene on October 25, 2020

 

Bishop Ronald Stephens (former Presiding Bishop of CACINA and former Pastor of St. Andrews the Apostle Church) is the Diocesan Bishop of the Diocese of Holy Trinity serving at St. Andrews along with Fr. Craig Wilt (Pastor), Associate Priest Fr. David Monroe and Deacon Gil Brooker in Midland, Virginia. St. Andrew the Apostle Church is a CACINA parish which shares space at Grace Episcopal Church located at 5096 Grace Church Lane, Midland, Virginia. (Fauquier County)

Facebook.com/ St. Andrew the Apostle Independent Catholic Church     Live streaming Mass every Sunday at 9:00am

at Facebook.com/ronaldstephens

 

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

 

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Sunday Mass 30th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in church events by revmtheogene on October 25, 2020

 

Holy Innocents Cathedral Church is a CACINA parish located on Halcottsville Road in Halcottsville, New York (Delaware County) in the Catskills region of New York. Bishop Francisco Betancourt, FCR and Fr. Dante Tarantini, FCR are the Co-Pastors of the community. Holy Innocents Church owns its own church.

Website: https://www.holyinnocentscacina.org     Facebook.com/franciscobetancourt     Live streaming Mass every Sunday at 11:00am on Facebook.

 

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

 

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Love God Love your neighbor

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 25, 2020

In the Gospel today, Jesus combines the commandment to love God with the commandment to love one’s neighbor and gives the result as the one Commandment of supreme importance in Christian life. Jesus underlines the principle that we are to love our neighbor as we love ourselves because, as God’s children, both of us bear God’s image, and to honor God’s image is to honor Him. Love for our neighbor should not be a matter of feelings, but of deeds by which we share with others the unmerited love that God lavishes on us.

We need to love God: Loving God with all our heart, soul, mind and strength, in response to His total love for us, means that we should place God’s will ahead of ours.P. We must keep God’s Commandments, and offer daily prayers of thanksgiving, praise and petition. We also need to read and meditate on His word in the Bible and accept His invitation to join Him in the Mass and other liturgical functions.

We need to love our neighbor: God’s will is that we should love everyone, seeing Him in each of them. Since every human being is the child of God and the dwelling place of the Spirit of God, we are giving expression to our love of God by loving our neighbor as Jesus loves him or her.

This means we need to help, support, encourage, forgive, and pray for everyone without discrimination based on color, race, religion, gender, age, wealth, social status or life style. Forgiveness, too, is vital. We love others by refusing to hold a grudge for a wrong done to us. We also express love through encouragement and by helping others to grow. We express agápe love in meeting the needs of others by using the talents and blessings that God has given us to comfort each other, to teach each other and to share the Gospel with each other, in deeds and words

Will you bear fruit

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 24, 2020

Today’s Gospel passage explains how God, our merciful and compassionate Father, disciplines His children, giving them painful experiences in life so that they may repent of their sins, renew their lives and produce the fruits of love, mercy, forgiveness, and service. Citing two tragic events, Jesus says to repent and reform. Repentance is turning from sin to God. With the parable of the barren fig tree, he also warns them that the merciful God will not put up with us indefinitely. Although God patiently waits for sinners to repent, giving them grace to do so, He will not wait forever. Time will run out; therefore, timely repentance is necessary.

We need to live lives of repentance, because we never know when we will meet a tragedy of our own; repentance helps us in life and in death. Repentance helps us to live with peace of mind as forgiven people and helps us to face death without fear. Scripture says repentance results in forgiveness, renewal, and redirection whereas failure to repent results in a guilty conscience which destroys our peace of mind and thus punishes us with a miserable life

Look for Jesus’ presence

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 23, 2020

We often talk about the weather in Eastern North Carolina . It’s a useful topic of conversation when we have nothing much else to say. Our weather coming in from the Atlantic is so changeable that it varies from day to day, so there is always something to say about it. It has either been raining a while back, or it is still raining or will be raining before long. A while week without rain considered worthy of special mention.

The people in Jesus’s time noticed the weather too. They knew what to expect from the direction of the wind, and so could “read the face of the earth and the sky.” Sadly they were unable to read signs of the times. They failed to recognise that God was among them in a special way.

We too can be very aware of the weather but not so aware of how God is present to us. Jesus will be with us always until the end of time. The signs of his presence can be subtle and non-dramatic, but true and real. We pray for sight to see how the Lord is present to us, especially in and through those whom we meet in the course of our day.

Are you on fire

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 22, 2020

In today’s Gospel, Jesus warns his disciples about the contention and division which will accompany the Gospel. He spells out the shocking, two-fold effects of his mission, namely 1) casting fire on the earth and 2) causing division in families and communities.

Standing in the prophetic tradition, Jesus preaches the word of God which, now as then, divides families, a message which will lead ultimately to his death. In the Bible, fire is often used to describe God’s burning love for men. This Divine love finds its highest expression in Jesus. The fire Jesus has come to bring is the fire of love, the fire of hope and the fire of justice.

The disruption, division and revolution which Jesus and his true followers cause by the fire of their sacrificial love and their eagerness for justice in society are necessary to re-set what’s fractured, to put right what’s dislocated and to cleanse what’s infected.

Jesus brings division because some follow him, and others oppose him. We must make a decision to follow him or not, to share his baptism or not. This choice can result in division, even within families.

We need to have fire in our hearts: Our Lord Jesus continues to cast fire on the earth, the fire of the Holy Spirit, the fire of His love, through the Church’s ministry of Word and Sacraments. As Christians, our Spirit-fire should inflame people to care, to serve, and to bless one another with all the gifts of Faith. We need Divine fire to inflame our hearts with the love of God, love for His children and zeal for spreading His Good News. Let us carry the fire of the Holy Spirit wherever we go. Strong Faith will ignite in us the fire of the Holy Spirit and give us the courage of our Christian convictions.

Stay alert

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 21, 2020

We don’t much like to be taken by surprise. We like to know what is coming and be ready for it. But the unexpected often happens, as is considered in today’s parable. The burglar breaks into a house when we least expect it. The owner arrives home at a time when his careless servant is fast asleep. There is an element of the unexpected in our relationship with Jesus.

We are to live each day as though the Son of Man were already at the door, just ready to come home after a long absence. Like the loyal servants, we must be ready when he comes. However hearty and healthy we may be, we know how fragile life can be and “We know neither the day nor the hour” when we may be called to God.

We may apply this to the hour of our death, for sudden, unexpected death is always possible. But the imagery can have a more positive meaning. The Lord comes to us in many ways, over the course of our lives. He may inspire us to do something we had not thought about before, or draw us down a path we might not have chosen ourselves. He can come to us through unexpected encounters, even with people who do not share our faith. At any time, expect the unexpected, because God’s ways are not our ways. But it’s all for the good!

Are you ready?

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 20, 2020

In today’s Gospel Jesus gives us the parable of the master and the servants. the chief characters are a master (representing the risen Jesus), and his servants (Jesus’ followers). Jesus’ words in this passage have two senses. In the narrower sense, the words refer to the Second Coming of Jesus, but in the broader sense they refer to the time of our own death, when God will call us to meet Him and to give Him an account of our life on earth.  Since the precise time of either is unknown to us, the proper attitude for us is constant watchfulness.  Since we cannot be sure about the day of our death, we should do our present work perfectly every day, and not leave it undone, half-done or postponed.

We need to stay vigilant and ready to face the Lord through prayer.  One of the traditional means for remaining alert is prayer.  This means we have to set aside a quiet time every day when we can tune our ears to God’s message of love, harmony and peace, and respond to Him.

We need to wait for the Lord. We must wait for the Lord in our daily lives by learning to see Jesus in the least of our brothers and sisters. In other words, we must be prepared to serve Jesus whenever and in whatever form he appears. What we discover in serving, loving, and helping other people is that God invariably comes to us through them.

Material Riches are not the measure of a Christian life

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 19, 2020

In toady’ Gospel Jesus tells the parable of the foolish rich man as a response to a Jew who had asked Jesus’ help in solving his dispute with his brother concerning their paternal inheritance.

Jesus uses the parable to warns us against all types of greed, because greed takes our life’s focus away from God and away from serving and loving other people. Instead, greed directs all our energy and attention to fulfilling the self, making our wealth the basis of our security.

Jesus also warns us against the temptation to place our dependence upon material things because “one’s life does not consist of possessions.” Through this parable Jesus teaches the audience the folly of greed and selfishness. He declares that the criterion for Heavenly bliss is not earthly wealth but how we share what we have with others.

We need to share our blessings with others because all these things have been loaned to us by God, and so we are accountable for their use. We must be generous in sharing our time, our treasure, and our talents. Also, we need to control our greed because it diverts our life and energies from loving God and from serving and loving Him in other people to loving ourselves alone.

Sunday Mass 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in church events by revmtheogene on October 18, 2020

 

Father Victor Ray, is the Pastor of Saint Teresa of Calcutta Catholic Community. He is assisted by Deacon Barbara Fichter. The Church is a CACINA parish located at 3803 Haines Road North in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Pinellas County) The church shares space at Allendale United Methodist Church.

Website: https://www.stoccc.org     Facebook.com/St. Teresa of Calcutta Catholic Community

Youtube.com/ St. Teresa of Calcutta Catholic Community     Live streaming Mass every Sunday at 10:30am on Facebook and YouTube.

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

 

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Sunday Mass 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in church events by revmtheogene on October 18, 2020

 

Father Larry Reidt is a CACINA Priest located in Spring Hill, Florida (Hernando County) North of Tampa Bay.

Facebook.com/ Saint Anne Mission     Live streaming Mass every Sunday at 10:00am

 

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

 

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

God used pagans to accomplish his plan how much more will he use us who are his people

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 18, 2020

In the first reading for this Sunday, the Prophet Isaiah, makes a startling statement.  He refers to King Cyrus of Persia, a pagan, as someone who has been anointed by God.  A pagan as the Messiah?  Definitely unheard of in the Hebrew communities.  Isaiah calls Cyrus anointed because God used him to restore the people of Israel from their exile. The Gospels relate a second shocking statement regarding a pagan ruler.  This time the statement was made by Jesus.  The Pharisees and Herodians plotted together to frame a gotcha question to Jesus.

Is it lawful to pay tax to Caesar or not?” If Jesus said, “No” the Herodians would certainly report him to the Romans as seditious. If He said, “Yes,” the Pharisees would tell the people that this proves that Jesus was not a real Jew but a collaborator with the pagan Romans. Jesus turned the tables by saying, “Render to Caesar what is Caesar’s and to God what is God’s.” He was telling them to recognize their responsibilities to the Romans, and more than this, recognize their responsibilities to their God.

God used pagans to accomplish his plans. How much more will He use us who are His People? God has a plan for each one of us, which is all part of His divine plan for the human race. Every one of us is called to make the presence of God real in the world. Since we are each unique, the presence that we each bring to the world is a reflection of God the world never saw before and will never see again. He uses each one of us for His Divine Purpose.

Be my witness

Posted in homily by frtonys on October 17, 2020

In today’s Gospel, Jesus requires His disciples to be willing to give witness to Him.  Those who acknowledge their relationship with Jesus will be recognized in heaven.  Jesus also speaks about the role of the Holy Spirit in the life of the disciples.  Those who refuse the gifts of the Holy Spirit and blaspheme the Holy Spirit and continue to remain in a position contrary to the working of the Holy Spirit commit an unforgivable sin.  Yet those who allow the Spirit to work in their lives will be given the words to speak when the time comes to proclaim their allegiance to the Lord Jesus.

Speaking about faith is just as hard today because so much of our culture and public discourse is hostile to religion, and in particular to Catholicism. We might easily be cowed into silence and invisibility and even abandon the very idea of handing on the faith.

To be faithful we must resist that temptation, and do whatever we can to commend the message of Christ. If we try to do that, we are promised the help of the Holy Spirit, who helps us in our weakness.