CACINA

Homily March 22, 2015 The 5th Sunday of Lent

Posted in Called, christian, Christianity, homily, inspirational, religion, Resurrection, scripture, Word by Fr Joe R on March 18, 2015

5 lent 1The time for a new covenant is at hand. Today we see some Greeks want to see or talk to Jesus who had thus far limited his ministry to the Jews in Israel. 5 lent 2His response is to compare himself to a grain of wheat, a small seemingly insignificant item easily missed until it falls to the ground and dies(is planted). In dying, it begins to grow spreading out roots and pushing up to the surface and producing much fruit. Here in John’s gospel, Jesus is foretelling his death, that he must die and that he must be lifted up. This is why he was born and why he is present to them. But only in being lifted up will he draw all things to himself. Christ knew the death he would die and that it was inevitable, but like the grain of wheat, fruit or blossoms would only come after Jesus Christ Crucifixion on Good Friday Silhouettedeath.
In today’s world, we honor similar martyrdom in war and even in everyday life. Nothing is more poignant than to see and hear the valor and often the sacrifice of a medal of honor winner. A risk or possibly even the giving up of life so others might live. We honor people who will stand and sacrifice possibly their life 5 lent 3for a principle or their faith or religion. In the last hundred years, humanity has seen fit to continually wage war or fighting in some form almost if not in every one of these years. Slavery, abuse, suffering are still not eradicated from the plant earth. This doesn’t touch on the people of the world who go hungry.
Yet, Christ has died and he does draw all to himself. His message has yet to be universally spread to all the ends of the earth. In some places his message is obscured because we have 5lent 5westernized it or made it too comfortable to our own time and place. His message was one to draw all to him, to believe and to follow, to worship in his name. Simply, does the grandeur of Christianity today that we see in the so-called first world, fit in out in the highways and byways of the third world and beyond? He died for them too, but how do we reach out and adapt to their understanding. His embrace is of all, his Spirit goes out to all. We must be open and not preconceive or put boundaries on what the Spirit can do. Remember Christ was lifted up not once simply on the cross but also in the triumph of the resurrection.

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Homily for the 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A 2014

Homily for the 15th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A  2014

Although the dominant theme of the first and last reading is about metaphorically sowing seeds, first by Isaiah in his preaching, and secondly, by Christ in his parables, I would like to concentrate my comments today on the second reading of Paul to the Romans.

Paul begins by commenting on the sufferings of the present time. While he is referring to his own time and the persecutions and struggles of the young community, we can also accept that it means our present time on earth. I think each generation for two thousand years has had unique types of suffering in their present time from the Black Death to AIDS, from Roman martyrs to Jewish Holocaust victims. Suffering is something that has unfortunately been with us through the ages.

Paul’s comment on the sufferings we endure, however, is that no amount of suffering can compare with the glory that will come to us in the end. But we cannot know this – it is promised to us – and it must be revealed to us by faith. In other words, the sufferings we endure in our brief life spans will turn into a glorious new life, one without suffering, without fear, without death.

Glory might also refer to the revelation itself. When Paul wrote, the Gospels had not yet been written, and perhaps the Word of God, spoken by Isaiah and by Jesus in the readings today, is the glory which is coming.

In either case – the sufferings will stop. And Paul extends this idea in very universal terms. The whole of creation has been waiting for this revelation. Because of the first sin, all sorts of evil, but especially death has entered the world – we are as Paul says, in bondage to decay – and it is in turning away from God and his creation that men and women have brought this suffering into the world.  It was not in God’s plan which was for there to be the “freedom of glory” for “the children of God”.

And so we have that remarkable image of childbirth – the world in labor pains waiting for the birth of the glory of the children of God, for people to be rescued for the suffering and death that had been in command.

I don’t know how many of you have actually given birth or witnessed a birth. I remember vividly the difference between my two children’s birth. They are 5 years apart so a lot had changed in those five years.  For my oldest I was allowed in the labor room with my wife, but was kicked out just before the birth. All I saw was the pain, and I was actually quite resentful of that pain. It really bothered me for a long time. But when my second came along five years later, I was allowed to be there for the whole birth and was able to experience the pain turn into absolute joy. This is what Paul is talking about. Pain turning into joy or glory! 

Extending the image though, Paul says that while we are on earth we are still experiencing the labor pains and haven’t yet experienced the glory. Through revelation, through the teachings of Jesus, through our faith, we know that we will experience it, however. This is the good soil that Jesus talks about today. We hear the revelation, the word, and we understand it, and because of that we will bear fruit, we will give birth, we will come to glory at the end of our earthly lives.

These teachings of Paul that come from Jesus’ own words are so optimistic, so stress reducing, if we just hear them. Yes, we have to struggle in this life, our lives are filled with loss, with pain, with sorrow, with fear, with sin. But we know that God is in the process of making the world good again and we can have faith that God is true to his Word and his Vision and will complete the work.

Death for the Christian will be a freeing event – will we be born again and experience God. At the end of time, there will be no more death, no more suffering and the world will be restored to its original goodness.

What can this mean to us this week? I hope that it gives us the strength to get through difficult times. To know that our sufferings will have an end, and like pain in the birth of a child, the pain will produce something glorious. Let this sustain us in those difficult times. Eye has not seen, ear has not hear what God has prepared for those who love him, Paul has told us in Corinthians. Let that sustain us when we are down.

Let us keep the soil of our lives good and receive the hundredfold promised us.

And this is the Good News, the revelation of things to come that our reading of Paul and of the Gospel tells us today.

Bishop Ron Stephens 

Pastor of St. Andrew’s Parish in Warrenton, VA

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[You can purchase a complete Cycle A of Bishop Ron’s homilies, 75 of them, from amazon.com for $9.99 – “Teaching the Church Year”]

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Homily November 10, 2013 32nd Sunday of Ordinary Time

Posted in christian, Christianity, ecclesiology, inspirational, religion, scripture by Fr Joe R on November 5, 2013

Today’s readings present us with questions concerning death and resurrection or life after death. While all of us have experienced seeing death or the burial of someone, it remains a reality that we find hard to accept and understand, especially when it happens to a loved one of ours. Faith and scriptures tell us many things about faith and death and dying, but in the end death remains a mystery, a vacuum to us who remain behind. The hypothetical question of the seven brothers presented to Jesus today, while accurate in following the law of Moses, was presented to trick Jesus to say things and commit what the Sadducees would call theological error against what was their belief. What Jesus left us was a glimpse into His own self and a mystery of what would come. The ways of human life on earth would not be present in an after life. Marriage, reproduction, human needs would all take on a different tone a different way. The love of God is the core and center of life both here and in future life. The love and pleasures of human life, in fact life itself will take on a whole different way which is incomprehensible to us who are tied to a material inflexible world.

Jesus and the Sadducees

Jesus and the Sadducees

What I find interesting is the fear many people have of dying and what life will be. At the same time others simply accept death as a part of their journey of faith undaunted by the mystery of not knowing what lies ahead. Throughout history both before and after Christ’s time we see men and women who have stepped forward and gave up their lives in the name of God for their faith or even out of love for another person. Having myself once been at that threshold for several weeks and slowly recovering, found the greatest insight in that time was that the love of God and those around me brings a love and awareness that life and living is a gift and joy that fills and animates everyday. If we can take advantage of that now , how much more will it be when we are called to the fulfillment of that life and the love that has filled it in the course of a lifetime. Love is the key and cornerstone of the after life. God is Love and now is the time to form and shape it and share it and prepare for that final time of love and sharing which will always be.

Considering that, it might help explain a little the mystery of resurrection and life. In human love, The reach and boundaries of love are limitless and at times astonishing to us, even more so in this age of mass communication when so many stories and happenings are shared. Even in this life we are at times confounded by it. This being the case, what lies beyond will be just as great and astonishing.