CACINA

Gender Equality and Women’s History Month

Posted in Uncategorized by revmtheogene on March 23, 2021

 

This week – Celebrating St. Tabitha (Dorcas)

 

 

In Acts 9:36-43, we read of Tabitha, “a disciple” who led a house church in Joppa, just 30 miles northwest of Jerusalem. She fell ill and died, leaving “all the widows … weeping and showing tunics and other clothing she had made for them” (Acts 9:39). Luke shows Peter hastening to Joppa where, after he prays over her, Tabitha is raised from the dead.

Because she is the only woman given the grammatically feminine title of “disciple” (mathetria) in the entire New Testament, some commentators suggest Tabitha was one of the women in Jesus’s Galilean discipleship. Peter may have known her well.

Since no male relative is anywhere in evidence, Tabitha was probably a widow herself. Biblical scholars suggest she was a leader of a congregation of widows at Joppa and a foremother of the “order of widows” prominent in the church into the third century.

Honor the ‘mothers’ of early Christianity during Women’s History Month
www.ncronline.org

 

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Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Ellis Medicine COVID-19 Vaccine Update with Bishop Tony Green

Posted in Uncategorized by revmtheogene on February 14, 2021

Bishop Tony Green is the Co-Pastor of St. John of God Parish in Schenectady, New York. Bishop Green is the Director of Pastoral Care and is head Chaplain at Ellis Medicine overseeing three (3) medical (hospital) facilities and nursing homes. Bishop Green is featured in the video.

 

 

For information on Ellis Medicine, please contact them directly. (Not affiliated with CACINA)

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

 

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

National Council of Churches

Posted in Uncategorized by revmtheogene on September 3, 2020

 

CACINA is a member communion of the
National Council of Churches through
The International Council of Community Churches

 

 

(Another) Statement on the Shooting of Black Men by Police: We’re Weary But Not Too Tired to Continue the Fight for Justice

 

They have treated the wound of my people carelessly, saying, “Peace, peace,” when there is no peace.
Jeremiah 6:14 (NRSV)

Washington, D.C., August 26, 2020—Another shooting. Another video. More trauma for a community and our nation. It is hard to believe that we are in the position to have to issue another statement on police shootings. Yet, here we are. This past weekend our nation again witnessed Black men being shot by police – one is paralyzed and fighting for his life; the other died.

The National Council of Churches USA (NCC) is again outraged by the shooting of Jacob Blake, III, who was shot by Kenosha, WI, police on Sunday, Aug. 23. Video evidence seems to show clearly that Blake was unarmed and walking away from white police officers when he was shot multiple times in the back at point blank range in front of his three young children. A part of NCC’s extended family, Blake is the grandson of African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Pastor Rev. Jacob Blake, Sr., who served in Evanston, IL at Ebenezer AME Church during the 1960s and 70s and was an activist for fair housing in the affluent Chicago suburb.

In addition, the NCC is further outraged by the killing of Trayford Pellerin by police in Lafayette, LA on Saturday, Aug. 22. Like Mr. Blake, Mr. Pellerin was walking away from police. His family has suggested that a mental health crisis may have prompted calls to 911 about a “disturbance” that ended with Mr. Pellerin being shot and killed.

The news of these tragic events are disheartening and cause us to ask the question, when will it end? We’re weary but not too tired to continue working for change and fighting for justice.

These incidents also highlight the need for police reform and increased de-escalation training. Therefore, we repeat our call for full, transparent, and independent investigations of the conduct of the officers involved in both of these terrible shootings. We repeat our call for the use of body cameras to be used by every sworn officer in the Kenosha Police Department – as well as in police departments across the country—and we urge the Lafayette Police Department to immediately release body camera footage of the incident with Mr. Pellerin. These basic first steps, while not the entire solution, help to provide accountability in horrific situations such as these and reduce the likelihood that they occur in the first place.

Moreover, the case with Mr. Pellerin reinforces the need for communities to have greater investments in mental health services and not to use police as first responders when a mental health professional will be more effective and have a better chance of saving lives.

For these injustices to continue after months of robust protests following the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery as well as too many others, is indicative of how deeply broken our systems are and how much work is yet to be done to end racism, white supremacy and unconscious bias.

We pray for Mr. Blake’s complete physical and emotional healing from the multiple gunshot wounds and the horror of this situation. We pray that his three young children and family as well as the community will heal from the trauma caused by the shooting. We pray for the family and friends of Mr. Pellerin who mourn his unnecessary killing.

And, we pray for our nation to heal and to move swiftly and decisively toward justice. We must end the racism that infests our institutions and perpetuates the myth that Black lives are expendable. Black lives matter.

CACINA video That They All May Be One

Posted in Uncategorized by revmtheogene on July 29, 2020

 

That They All May Be One

 

 

During this time of quarantine and self reflection, a message for all. CACINA video made by Bishop Tony Green.

All are welcome, not only in this time of crisis, but always!

CACINA Catholic Who and Independent What STOCCC Workshop

Posted in church events, Uncategorized by revmtheogene on July 26, 2020

 

Saint Teresa of Calcutta Catholic Community (STOCCC)   Workshop  on CACINA Catholic Who? and Independent What?

Father Victor Ray is the Pastor of Saint Teresa of Calcutta Catholic Community. He is assisted by Deacon Barbara Fichter. The Church is a CACINA parish located at 3803 Haines Road North in St. Petersburg, Florida. (Pinellas County) The church shares space at Allendale United Methodist Church.

 

Website: https://www.stoccc.org     Facebook.com/St. Teresa of Calcutta Catholic Community

Youtube.com/ St. Teresa of Calcutta Catholic Community     Livestreaming Mass every Sunday at 10:30am on Facebook and YouTube.

 

 

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Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Who Lives and Who Dies Webinar

Posted in church events, Uncategorized by revmtheogene on July 24, 2020

CACINA is a Member of the National Council of Churches

 

WEBINAR

Who Lives and Who Dies: How COVID-19 Has Shined a Light on the Politics of Death in United States

The political scientist Achille Mbembe conceptualizes necropolitics as such: “The ultimate expression of sovereignty resides, to a large degree, in the power and the capacity to dictate who may live and who must die.” COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that has highlighted a historic truth about the United States. The country was founded and built on systemic and systematic race, class and gender hierarchical constructs that ranks the value of people groups. The coronavirus has shined a light on how our systems and structures determine who should live and who is expendable. Join the National Council of Churches in a theological, political and cultural conversation on necropolitics, the politics of death, with three of the most sought after scholars on politics, religion, and culture.

Thursday July 30
2:00-3:30pm ET

 

Dr. Brittney Cooper is Associate Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Africana Studies at Rutgers University. Dr. Cooper is the author of Beyond Respectability: The Intellectual Thought of Race Women (U of Illinois Press, 2017), winner of the Organization of American Historians Merle Curti Prize for Best Book in U.S. Intellectual History. She is also author of the New York Times Bestselling Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpower (St. Martin’s Press, 2018).

Professor Cooper has been named to The Root 100 multiple times, most recently in 2018. She is a frequent commentator for MSNBC and her work has been featured in the New York Times, Time Magazine, the Washington Post, BET, Essence Magazine, the Root and many other publications.

 

Dr. Melanye Price, Endowed Professor of Political Science and principal investigator for the Mellon Foundation African American Studies Initiative at Prairie View A&M University, Houston TX. Price’s research and teaching expertise include black politics, public opinion, political rhetoric, and social movements. She is the author of, “The Race Whisperer: Barack Obama and the Political Uses of Race” (NYU, 2016) and “Dreaming Blackness: Black Nationalism and African American Public Opinion” (NYU, 2009). Her next project is “Mountaintop Removal: Martin Luther King, Trump and the Racial Mountain,” which uses King’s “Mountaintop Speech” as a lens for understanding the rise of Trump and the 2016 election.

Dr. Price has is a sought after political commentator whose opinion has been published in several media outlets including The New York Times, Ms. Magazine, The Hartford Courant, Vox, Pacifica and NYC and CT Public Radio. She was also a contributor to Stanley Nelson’s documentary, Obama: Through the Fire, which aired on BET.

 

Rev. Dr. Obery M. Hendricks, Jr., is a Distinguished Senior Fellow at the Democracy Collaborative in Washington, DC. Dr. Hendricks has been called one of the most provocative and innovative commentators on the intersection of religion, politics and social policy in America today. A widely sought lecturer and media spokesperson, his media appearances include C-SPAN, PBS, NPR, al-Jazeera Television, Fox News, the Bloomberg Network, among others. He is also an editorial advisor to the award-winning Tikkun magazine, a contributing editor to The Encyclopedia of Politics and Religion, and a principal commentator in the The Oxford Annotated Bible.

Dr. Hendricks is the author of The Universe Bends Toward Justice: Radical Reflections on the Bible, the Church and the Body Politic (Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2011),The Politics of Jesus: Rediscovering the True Revolutionary Nature of Jesus’ Teachings and How They Have Been Corrupted (New York: Doubleday, 2006). Dallas Evening News Bestseller and Living Water: A Novel (New York: HarperCollins, 2003), National & Essence Magazine Bestseller.

 

Rev. Aundreia Alexander is the Associate General Secretary for Action and Advocacy for Justice and Peace at the National Council of Churches. (Moderator)

Serving as a leading voice of witness to the living Christ in the public square since 1950, 
the National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA (NCC) brings together 38 member communions 
and more than 40 million Christians in a common expression of God’s love and promise of unity. 
http://nationalcouncilofchurches.us

Please go to the National Council of Churches website to register.  http://nationalcouncilofchurches.us

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Churchionalcouncilofchur in North America by forwarding this message to others.

 

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Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

 

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Thought for the Day

Posted in Uncategorized by revmtheogene on July 21, 2020

Image may contain: mountain, sky, ocean, nature and outdoor, text that says 'Prayer is not asking. Prayer is putting oneself in the hands of God, at His disposition, and listening to His voice in the depth of our hearts. Mother Teresa'

Sunday Mass 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Mother Monica Kennedy is the Pastor of Saint Charles of Brazil which is a CACINA parish located at 116 Marydell Road in Linthicum, Maryland (Anne Arundel County). The church shares space with St. Christopher’s Episcopal Church.

Website: https://www.stcharlesofbrazil.org     Facebook.com/St. Charles of Brazil Independent Catholic Church

YouTube.com/ St. Charles of Brazil     Livestreaming Mass every Sunday at 10:30am on Facebook and YouTube.

 

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

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Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Sunday Mass 16th Sunday in Ordinary Time

The Parish of Saints Francis and Clare is a CACINA parish located at 2300 NW 9th Avenue (Powerline Road) in Wilton Manors, Florida (Broward County) the greater Fort Lauderdale area. Fr. Joseph Spina, OSF is the Pastor and is accompanied by Fr. Vincent Treglio, OSF, Associate Pastor. Assisting clergy are Fr. Peter Sanchez, OSF and Fr. Paul Pfadenhauer. The Franciscan Friars of Fort Lauderdale are the Guardians of the parish. Francis and Clare rents an entire building.  Livestreaming Mass every Sunday at 10:30am on Facebook. Homily posted on YouTube.

Website: https://www.stsfrancisandclare.org     Facebook.com/stsfrancisandclare     Youtube.com/stsfrancisandclare

 

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Our Lady of Mount Carmel

Posted in Uncategorized by revmtheogene on July 16, 2020

Our Lady of Mt. Carmel (1251 A.D.) is a title of the Blessed Virgin Mary associated with the Carmelite Order. The first Carmelites lived as hermits on Mt. Carmel in the Holy Land beginning in the 12th century. In the middle of their hermitages, they built a chapel dedicated to the Virgin Mary, who became the protectress of the Carmelites under the title of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. The Blessed Virgin Mary appeared to a Carmelite hermit, St. Simon Stock, under this title and gave him a piece of cloth—the brown scapular—as a sacramental to be worn by the faithful to whom she promised her special protection. At the apparitions in Fatima, in addition to appearing as Our Lady of the Rosary, the Virgin Mary appeared as Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. Her feast day is July 16th.

Image may contain: 6 people, text that says 'OUR LADY OF MT. CARMEL'

CACINA Welcome video

 

 

Video designed by Bishop Tony Green

 

Please help us spread the word about the Catholic Apostolic Church in North America by forwarding this message to others.

Find us at http://www.cacina.org or https://www.facebook.com or http://www.cacina.wordpress.com

Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America. All rights reserved.

Contact us at 1- (800) 603-0644

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

Upcoming Sunday Mass with the Franciscans of Fort Lauderdale Florida

Posted in Uncategorized by revmtheogene on July 3, 2020

A reflection by Bishop Tony Green from Saint John of God Parish

 

If you would like to have a reflection considered for publication, please send your writing to Bp. Tony Green at revtonygreen@gmail.com

 

                                                         Independence Day – Celebrate or Observe?

                                                               A reflection by Bishop Tony Green

 

I listen to NPR every morning on my drive to work at Ellis.  This morning, Thursday, July 2nd, I heard reporter Juana Summers report on how every year on the 4th of July we reflect on the promises of the United States of America.  Summers goes on to say, “This year we will reflect on how those promises are not equally fulfilled.”  I listened to several Black Americans describe their struggle to reconcile systemic racism with pride in our country.

One interviewee, Trevor Smith, said, “You grow up hearing and saying  …one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all, and then you realize, oh, wait…it has never really meant liberty and justice for all.”  Another interviewee, Timothy Berry, class president of his graduating class at West Point Military Academy, said he finds a lot of contradiction in what the United States says it is and what it actually is.  Berry said he feels his role is to do his part to hold the country accountable.

In years past, I have simply thought of Independence Day in too shallow a way.  I have known since grade school that it represents the Declaration of Independence from British governance.  I have celebrated a lifetime of July 4th’s on the lake, family barbeques, fireworks shows, and cans of Budweiser.

This year I will re-think, hopefully in a deeper way, what has happened, and has not happened that should have happened in this country since July 4th of 1776.  This year, I will observe Independence Day rather than celebrate it.  It is difficult, if not impossible to celebrate the great ideal of liberty and justice when it has yet to become a reality for all – especially for communities of color.

It is a good thing to know history, or we are doomed to repeat it.  I’ll leave you with a paragraph from a speech that Frederick Douglass delivered on July 5, 1852, entitled, What to the Slave is the 4th of July?

“What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer: a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciations of tyrants, brass fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade, and solemnity, are, to him, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy — a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices, more shocking and bloody, than are the people of these United States, at this very hour.”

  

If you would like to have a reflection considered for publication, please send your writing to Bp. Tony Green at revtonygreen@gmail.com

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Daily Mass

A reflection by Mary Desantis – St. John of God Parish CACINA  

If you would like to have a reflection considered for publication, please send your writing to Bp. Tony Green at revtonygreen@gmail.com

                                                                                  Ordinary Time

                                          A reflection by Mary Desantis – St. John of God Parish CACINA

 

The word TIME can be a topic of reflection all on its own. For example: What is it? How is it used? How does it impact life? How do we view it? All are valid ways of reflecting on time. My reflection today has been influenced by the Liturgical Calendar, which in the Catholic Tradition is used throughout a year to refer to different liturgical periods. Presently the liturgical season being observed is called “Ordinary Time”. Only a few major feasts occur in this liturgical season in contrast to other seasons of the Church Year like Advent, Christmas, Easter, etc. This is what is particular to Ordinary Time.

However, Ordinary Time it is NOT! Not in our society today! Not within our everyday lives currently being reflected in our culture. This is a time of deep division, civil unrest, frustration, deaths occurring in our streets, total disregard for human life, etc. Coupled with this is a health pandemic the wake of which has not been experienced before in our country. And we are told by scientific data that it is not over by any means as others might have us think. Most want to see it contained if not eradicated all together. Too many lives have been lost to death and/or changed forever by this beastly virus. Ordinary Time it is not.

In the midst of all this suffering, where is God? Where God always is:  right in the struggle with us. Does God have a message for humanity as we endure the trauma of this time? No matter what takes place in human life God always has a message. No different now, here in this time than in other times. Part of the message always is that God continues to be among us, continually loving us because God is Love. However, another part of the message from God always contains an expectation of us. What might that be in these dark times?

Perhaps it is to be light for the world, to be salt for the earth, to take a stand against evil, to speak out against injustice, to show compassion.  LISTEN to one another. Really Listen. Learn from one another.  “Work” together, side-by-side sharing your talents and resources in building a future far better than the present for everyone. We are in grave circumstances that threaten the very life of the soul of humankind and this country.

By no means is this Ordinary Time. But we can make it a productive time, a cohesive time. A time we can right the wrongs of history, set a new course that is an all-inclusive one, bury the division among us, quit the blaming and move forward. Not an ordinary nor an easy task but one that is very much doable. The next generation deserves no less a legacy from us.

Amen

 

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Website

Copyright © 2020, Catholic Apostolic Church in North America, All rights reserved.

 

Our mailing address is:

Fr. Joseph Reynolds, Chancellor

9314 Doris Dr.

Oriental, NC 28571

A reflection by Mike Ellis – CACINA Seminarian

If you would like to have a reflection considered for publication, please send your writing to Bp. Tony Green at revtonygreen@gmail.com

 

                                                                      A Conversation With Jesus

                                                   A reflection by Mike Ellis – CACINA Seminarian

 

“So Jacob was left alone, and a man wrestled with him till daybreak . . .   the man touched the socket of Jacob’s hip so that his hip was wrenched as he wrestled . . .Then the man said, ‘Your name will no longer be Jacob, but Israel, because you have struggled with God . . .’ ”  Genesis  32:24-25,28 (NIV)

 

It had been one of those conversations that just goes on and on.  You think you’re done with it, and then, discovering there’s another piece of it, something left unsaid, unprocessed and unredeemed, it resurfaces, intruding on your day, your mind, your heart, and your relationship.

In my case, it was further complicated because this was a conversation I was having, or at least attempting to have, with Jesus.  And it seemed it just wouldn’t end.  Either he or I just couldn’t let go of it and move on.  Not yet, anyway.

Finally, exhausted and depressed, I gave up.  “Ok Lord, I’ll apologize to her.”, I said.  “Even though my intentions were good – you’re my witness – and she clearly overreacted, threatening to quit our volunteer group because either what I said or the way I said it hurt her feelings (how childish!), I’ll bite the bullet, be the bigger person, and somehow find some way of apologizing to her that doesn’t offend my own sense of integrity.  Now can we just move on?”

But still it didn’t work.  He wasn’t having it.  And all my sincere pleas for him to quiet my unrest, to grant me peace, and to “return to me the joy of my salvation”, seemed to fall flat. He wouldn’t let it be.  He wouldn’t let me be.

I was Christ-haunted.

I had experienced Jesus this way before.  It usually started with some realization of vulnerability on my part, and, when that was not easily or readily processed by me, it progressed to anxiety.  It was then that I would start talking to Jesus about it, and he would usually relieve me of it pretty quickly, sometimes in ways that seemed quite miraculous, both in their method and timing. (I mean, the stories I could tell!  Really!)

But every once in awhile, he would respond differently.  We’d go deeper, both into my brokenness and our conversation about my brokenness.  And even though I was learning that he would walk with me through it, that we would eventually come out of it (we always had before), and that he would leave me with a deeper sense of belonging to him, I have to say I actually dreaded those times.  They were hard on me, mostly because I wasn’t actually sure I would come out of it.

This was one of those times, and it went on and on.

 

It ended, finally, with this exchange:

Him: “Forget, forgive, love and laugh.”

Me:   “I’ll try.”

Him: “Don’t let anything that anybody does to you change the way you treat them.  Love everybody I send your way.”

Me:     “I honestly don’t know how to do that.  I just don’t feel that way towards everybody.”

Him:   “Then treat them as you would treat me.”

Me:     “Ok. . . That helps. . . (long pause) But they don’t always act like you.”

Him :  “I know. . . (equally long pause) Will you just do this for me?”

Me:      (heart-pierced) “For you?  Yes.”

            (then, after a very long pause)  . . . “I can be pompous sometimes.”

Him:   (silence)

Me:    “This apology, it’s . . .”

Him:   “ . . .my way of keeping you close to me.”

Me:     (suddenly tearful)  “. . . your way of keeping me close to you.”

“Israel is the name of everyone who has been made lame by God.”  Elie Wiesel

 

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