CACINA

Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe- Fr. Vincent Treglio of Sts. Francis and Clare

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TUESDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

TUESDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Isaiah Chapter 40 verses 1-11 / Psalm 96 verses 1-3 & 10AC, 11-13 /  Matthew Chapter 18 verses 12-14.

 

Who in our lives have we dropped everything for? Have we ever reached out to find a teacher or friend in our past who made a difference in our lives? When have we reached out for the one? Sisters and brothers, we have to remember that sometimes in our lives we have to be mindful that the one person who may be missed, neglected, suffering, or forgotten among us needs to be recognized. We need to be the light that leads them out of the darkness. If we have their permission, and if appropriate, we can help guide those among us who may not only be lost, but forgotten, bullied, those suffering from mental and emotional illness, and those lonely who have no one to turn to.  Sometimes the need of the one can outweighs the needs of many.  Others in society may have a different opinion about who are worthy. Society has created a “throw away” culture for who they decide do not fit in.   What happened to  “we are all children of God”?  God is in everyone not just who we decide.

+ Michael Theogene

MONDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

 

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Isaiah Chapter 35 verses 1-10 / Psalm 85 verses 9A & 10, 11-14 /  Luke Chapter 5 verses 17-26.

Sisters and brothers, when in our lives have, we felt that we needed to have someone’s attention? Did we feel that, maybe at that time not one person was giving us the due attention that we felt we deserved? Why isn’t anyone listening to me? Sisters and brothers sometimes when we receive a little attention or praise , that can lift up our spirits. We have to be mindful that we can sometimes feel that we may be rejected or feel that we are those that society may turn away. If we are made aware, when putting our egos aside, that  we can live life without waiting for the approval of those around us.  We sometimes wait to hear, as it may be, for someone to  tell us that its okay to start or do a particular thing. And when we do this, why do we so easily give our lives up to someone else? Why don’t we give up our lives so easily to God? Why is that so difficult? If we come out of ourselves and stop focusing on getting noticed and give attention to those in our families, at work, or wherever, that can make all the difference. A little uplift to others can go a long way, helping someone help themselves, without sulking on the all about me but making true awareness to be able to praise God.

(rev.) Michael Theogene

 

Fr. Joe Spina, O.S.F., Pastor of Sts Francis and Clare in Wilton Manors, Florida

Homily- Fr. Vincent Treglio- 2nd Sunday of Advent- Parish of Sts. Francis and Clare

SOLEMNITY OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Inclusive Lectionary Text

Genesis Chapter 3 verses 9-15, 20 / Psalm 98: 1, 2-3AB, 3CD-4 / Ephesians Chapter 1 verses 3-6, 11-12 / Luke Chapter 1 verses 26-38

 

What an inspiration Mary is in so many ways.  A woman of great faith willing to say “yes” to the unknown.  A true leader to follow, a feminist who paved the way for the future.  Are we willing to say that unconditional “yes”? I think of those who are married, parents, teachers, the ordained, and many others. What was our “yes” moment in our lives that enabled us to make a difference in ourselves or for society? Be blessed!   

+ Michael Theogene

FRIDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT

 

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Isaiah Chapter 29 verses 17-24 / Psalm 27 verses 1, 4, 13-14 /  Matthew Chapter 9 verses 27-31.

Do we encourage others? If we do, how do we encourage them? If someone is in need, who comes into our presence, are we willing to help, or do we pass the buck?  

Sometimes we may be the only bible that people will every read. If that is the case, then we should really make sure that we are a good read.

+ Michael Theogene

WEDNESDAY OF THE FIRST WEEK OF ADVENT (homily)

The Metanoia Road

3rd Sunday of Easter, 4-15-18

Acts 3: 13-15,17-19; Psalm 4: 2-9; 1John 2: 1-5, Luke 24: 35-48

I will go out on a limb a little here, and hope that most everyone knows the story in Luke about “the Road to Emmaus”. It’s all in the very last chapter of Luke’s Gospel. Luke tells about a group of at least 5 women finding the tomb open and empty on Easter morning. They told the apostles, but the men did not believe them. That same day, two of Jesus’ followers left Jerusalem and started out, feeling sad and discouraged, on the 7 mile walk to Emmaus. Jesus joined them on their walk, but they didn’t recognize him. Jesus then interpreted the scriptures to them, explaining all that Moses and the many prophets had fore-told about him.

When they arrived at Emmaus, the men eagerly invited him to sit down to eat with them. But when Jesus took the bread and blessed it, they suddenly recognized him, and he disappeared. Usually we end the story with the verse “Did not our hearts burn within us while he talked and opened to us the scriptures?” But that is not the end of the story. Our Gospel today is what immediately follows.

Much of the time Jesus spent on earth, as the “historical Jesus” in the Gospels, he spent physically moving about. In a different way, he moved people around a lot too. He moved them from pain and disability to health. He moved people from doubt to belief. He moved people from confusion to clarity. He moved people from sin to grace and mercy. He moved those fishermen right into being fishers of people.

I would define a church as a group of people who want to be moved to love more, to be kinder and more compassionate, to being more generous, to better understanding the Risen Christ in their own lives. And when people choose to make their church a place of that type of movement, something else happens. People want to help other people, people outside of their church group, to move closer to Christ and make all those other good moves, too. And all the people begin to understand that this journey we are on moves along easier with a better understanding of Scripture. It just makes sense to follow Jesus’ lead on this!

So when the two men return to Jerusalem from Emmaus, they share their experience with the Risen Lord with the apostles and other disciples, when suddenly Jesus appears in the room. They don’t understand; they are terrified and Jesus has to show them his hands and feet and have them touch him, and he eats some fish in front of them to prove he is real. And once again, he explains the scriptures. He continues this time, and reminds them that he had told them it was their job now to teach repentance, for the forgiveness of sins must be preached in his name to all the nations.

But we have a language problem. “Repent” seems to imply that we have already done something wrong, regret it, and now want to behave differently. But Biblically, this is not all there is to it. In the gospels, the Greek word used for repentance is metanoia. Literally this means to do an about face, to turn around, to face in an entirely new direction.

So, metanoia means to move us beyond our present mindset, beyond our present way of thinking.  To repent is to let the soul, which is the image and likeness of God within us, re-configure us so that we are so overwhelmed with compassion and love that indeed we do turn and change how we think, how we understand, how we order our priorities, and how we react.  We must move past regret focused on our mistakes, and respond like Peter, in our first reading.  He meets some of those men who coerced Pilate into killing an innocent Jesus merely to make the social, economic, and political structure of the day benefit them a little longer.

Amazingly, Peter was so filled with compassion and love that he would joyfully lead them to repent and have their sins wiped away. The Catholic Church leadership was traditionally rooted in Peter, who clearly understood deeply and acted out “All Are Welcome Here – even the murderers of Jesus.”   It is a tradition to be proud of, and continued; to welcome man or woman, clean or addict, poor or rich, whatever color or race or sexual orientation, political affiliation, education level, ignorance quotient and so on and so on.  Only metanoia-style repentance can produce that level of welcome.

By now it is becoming clear that Jesus’ followers have to change. They no longer can be just followers of Jesus. They must begin to preach the Good News of Forgiveness and New Life in Christ. For mature Christians, Scripture and the Eucharist are sources of the necessary strength and connection with Jesus. That is what Jesus left his disciples. But many people today have never studied Scripture or been taught the meaning of the Eucharist. And those people will be the next generation of the church only if we want them to join us on our journey down the metanoia road.

Think about how those disciples felt that night, together with the Risen Christ. What is it they will go and do as a result of this experience? They will build a new “Way” for believers to worship and act out in faith. How were their lives different than before? They become bold and articulate, eager for difficult challenges. The life journey of those two men going to Emmaus Easter Day was certainly very different than the one they had planned. Spiritual leadership is about taking people on a journey, and every single Christian must participate fully in spiritual leadership before their joy will be full. What will be your first step on this journey? Where will you begin?