CACINA

EARTH DAY 2020 50th ANNIVERSARY

CHRISTMAS EVE- THE PARISH OF SAINTS FRANCIS AND CLARE- WILTON MANORS, FLORIDA- FR. VINCENT TREGLIO

FRIDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT

FRIDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Song of Songs Chapter 2 verses 8-14 / Psalm 33 verses 2-3, 11-12, 20-21 /  Luke Chapter 1 verses 39-45.

How much do we love God? Why do we sometimes find it easier to love others around us, who are in the flesh instead of loving someone who is not present to us in physical form? I am reminded of two former co-workers who were from Yemen and were practicing Muslims. They both were introduced to their respective spouses at about age 5 or 6 years old. They both never saw their spouse again until they walked down the aisle to profess their wedding vows. My co-workers were in an arranged marriage, orchestrated by their parents at early ages. Fast forward to the present, they both continue to speak of how in love they are with their spouses. Yes, they may have been a physical beauty, but both continue in their marriages of many years with grown children. What were their thoughts of their supposed beloved who they would not have seen for close to twenty (20) years? What might have they been thinking for so many years, who they knew who they were going to marry, by name perhaps, but no contact? Any courtships, were photos shown how their future wives would look like?

Friends, I am not advocating for or against arranged marriages, but the ability that we have to love, fall in love and keep falling in love with a Creator God who first loved us even before we were formed in the womb. Well maybe God is allowed to cheat since God had a first glance before our physical existence. The same way parents fall in love with a child before physical birth or the arrival of a child that is being adopted, the parents are slowly, steadily falling in love.

Let’s us not only fall in love with who we see but fall in love with those who are not in front of us. Loving the beauty of their souls not their physical looks. Seeing God within them and cherishing the gift they are in our lives.

+Michael Theogene

 

THURSDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT

THURSDAY OF THE THIRD WEEK OF ADVENT

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Isaiah Chapter 7 verses 10-14 / Psalm 24 verses 1-2, 3-4AB, 5-6 /  Luke Chapter 1 verses 26-38.

Friends, what are the blessings have we had among ourselves? What specifically can you recall, the choicest blessing that was bestowed upon you or someone you know?  Were you able to recognize it as a blessing?

When events such as these have taken place in our lives, what was our reaction? Did we tell anyone else about it? Did we display an attitude of gratitude?

We prayer thanking God for the many wonderful blessings for those things seen and not seen. Amen.

(rev.) Michael Theogene

THIRD SUNDAY OF ADVENT- FR. VINCENT TREGLIO- PARISH OF STS FRANCIS AND CLARE

SATURDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

SATURDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Sirach Chapter 48 verses 1-4, 9-11 / Psalm 80 verses 2AC & 3B /  Matthew Chapter 17 verses 9A, 10-13.

Are we prophets in our time? Has any of us felt that the things we say have fallen on deaf ears? When is our time, are we listening?  Do we need to be continually challenging ourselves and others? Do we come to restore all things or are we those who cause a hindrance to the community? How does our presence bring the peace of Christ in our midst? A lot to ponder during this time of waiting.  Be blessed.

(rev.) Michael Theogene

FRIDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

FRIDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Isaiah Chapter 48 verses 17-19 / Psalm 1 verses 1-4, & 6  Matthew Chapter 11 verses 16-19.

Friends, we are never really satisfied, are we? It is so much easier for us to point fingers towards others. We blame others for our problems, never really addressing our concerns to ourselves. It’s always everybody’s else’s fault, but mine! Does this sound familiar? It sure does to me. When we point a finger at someone, there are three others pointing back at us. How by our example will we simply show who we are? It is not for the purposes of trying to prove to people who we are, if so then we missed the point. It is by our example by being living witnesses of Gods word, and by this then we are made blameless in the sight of God. Be blessed.

+ Michael Theogene

Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe- Fr. Vincent Treglio of Sts. Francis and Clare

Today’s Homily at Holy Trinity, September 3, 2017-the 22nd Sunday in Ordinary Time–Vocations

Homily at Holy Trinity July 9, 2017- the 14th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Homily for the Feast of Pentecost Sunday, June 4, 2017

pent1Pentecost Sunday is a day as important as Easter and Christmas. What we celebrate is the coming of the Holy Spirit to Jesus’ followers and his new church. Our readings today tell us this is so, but at the same time we see different traditions and renderings of it. John places it on Easter night itself with Jesus appearance that first evening. Luke places it 50 days later. What we do know is that the early followers saw Jesus after his Resurrection and that in those times Jesus brought or sent his Holy Spirit to his Church and to the people of it. pent2Luke and John saw the Holy Spirit as a powerful force in the church and community and for its members. The enthusiasm of the disciples and the spread and growth of the community was something they clearly attributed to the Holy Spirit. Even today we see and experience the Holy Spirit in the church and in our parishes and communities. Christianity continues today not because men believe and work to keep it alive, but because the Holy Spirit keeps the Word alive. Humanity, unfortunately, has made a mess as we can see in the splits and divisions. Yet, in spite of that, Christ’s word continues to be present because his Spirit remains on the earth.

pent4The real lesson today of the Holy Spirit is to be open, to listen, to follow the promptings given out of sincere prayer. Like Christ, the Spirit moves and prompts us to move on to the way forward to His Father. As the world moves on, the Spirit prompts us to move with it. Over centuries of difficult learning the church and humanity has gradually learned the need to be open and to grow with the times and the unfolding of the wonders of creation as we get to know them better. Christ said the Spirit would teach them everything they would need to know, but first we must be open and listen and discern what the Spirit is helping us to understand. It is the Spirit who brings us to Jesus’ path to the Father. Like any path, it needs to be fresh and clear and ready for travel. Jesus led the way, and the Spirit keeps it prepared for us.

Thursday of the Fifth Week of Lent (April 6, 2017)

Inclusive Text- Readings- Genesis 17: 3-9 / Psalm 105: 4-9 / John 8: 51-59
Sisters and brothers, do we know God? Do we know Jesus? Do we know ourselves? How well do we know ourselves? Friends, I believe that as we journey in this life trying to know ourselves, in some small part we can learn about ourselves through our interactions with others. Whether good or bad, people are placed in our paths for one reason or another. Sometimes we learn from them and at other times they learn from us. Why were they there in the first place? Not a coincidence, a God incidence.
If we have found it hard at times to be free from persons in our present or past lives, I think we need to ask ourselves, who is it that is placed in our life that we must learn from? Who is it that I have allowed to help me shine or whom have I allowed to smother the light within me. What must we learn?
The people placed in our paths will always remind us of the positive or negative lessons in our lives. The question is my friends, what is it that we can carry further along with us on the journey and what is it that we are afraid to take and what must we leave behind?  
rev. Michael Theogene

Wednesday of the Fifth Week of Lent (April 5, 2017)

Inclusive Text- Readings- Daniel 3: 14-20, 91-92, 95 / Psalm: Daniel 3: 52-56 / John 8: 31-42

Friends, as I mentioned yesterday, remember at one time or another when you may not have felt welcomed. I am sure it has happened to us at one time or another. At the risk of sounding prideful, I have always felt that I can get along with anyone. However, there have been times when I was not welcomed, perhaps because of my friendliness. No matter what I thought of my actions in those moments, it was important not to take it personal and be aware of my lack of sensitivity to others needs in those situations, not my feeling of being unwelcome.

It reminds me of when two people are dating and it seems good and one party decided to break up the relationship, and states, ‘it’s not you, you are great, it’s me.’ Right away we blame ourselves for the breakup but in reality we are being called to live up to the real love of God in our lives and not blame ourselves or others and accept change.

rev. Michael Theogene

Tuesday of the Fifth Week of Lent (April 4, 2017)

Inclusive Text Readings- Numbers 21: 4-9 / Psalm 102: 2-3, 16-21 / John 8: 21-30

Not with standing all of our faults, sisters and brothers, have you ever felt that you did not belong? Perhaps at some point in your job or among family, you may have felt that you did not belong. Sisters and brothers, when we lift up Jesus, the Son of Humanity, then and only then will we realize it is Jesus who serves at our feet. Jesus was able to accomplish this only with the help of the Father. Jesus’ willing sacrifice to suffer for all of humanity is the gift lasting forever. This gift freely given should never be taken lightly. Jesus knew who he was and whose he was. Do we see ourselves as Jesus saw himself? Do we see ourselves in the same manner as Jesus saw himself with God as part of creation? My only wish for myself is that I hope that I am living and walking as Jesus did. By being a testimony of the life and resurrection of the beauty of creation and our place in it. I hope I am living fully the gifts I have been given. For what is given freely, I give back freely to creation as best as I can to all I encounter. Are we the face of God? Are we paying it forward?

rev. Michael Theogene

Reflection for Friday of the Third Week of Lent (March 24, 2017)

Inclusive Text- Readings- Hosea 14: 2-10 / Psalm 81: 6C-8ABC, 9-11AB, 14 & 17 / Mark 12: 28-34

Sisters and brothers, I don’t know about you but I find it very difficult at times to follow one of the instructions of St. Benedict. St. Benedict says, “Welcome all as if they were the Christ”. (Paraphrased) Without sounding as if I am bragging, I could honestly say that I would give the shirt on my back to anybody. I am sure, as we all have in one way or another done this. However, there are the times when I have said those words but have not carried them out. Our actions always speak louder than words. I have learned from my own experience and from what others have mentioned to me, that it is not so much what people say that has an effect on me but by who they are and how they live that really speaks volumes?

rev. Michael Theogene

Reflection for Thursday of the Third Week of Lent (March 23, 2017) Cycle A

Inclusive Text- Readings- Jeremiah 7: 23-28 / Psalm 95: 1-2, 6-9 / Luke 11: 14-23

Sisters and brothers, who is it that we rely on for our strength? Do we put our desire for strength in other humans or do we come and place our trust in the one who created us? Sometimes trust in others whether it is close friends or family can be good, but what happens to our trust when those individuals may put us down? This may not always happen but it can because we are only human. What happens to the trust we put in the Creator? Have we found ourselves disappointed?

It seems that it is us who can disappoint God which we know that is never the case. God sees and knows our potential but yet is always patient and gracious towards us and allows us to find our way. Hopefully with God’s help, we can find a way to be able to listen to God’s voice. Listening with the ear of our heart as St. Benedict reminds us. We may be waiting for the lightning bolt to show us what to do, but if we truly quiet our hearts and mind than we can get a glimpse of the whisper of what God is actually trying to tell us.

You have heard it said, God’s delay is not God’s denial as we are reminded by so much in the first and second testament writings. I sometimes believe that if we live without expectation then we will be truly blessed because we will never be disappointed.

rev. Michael Theogene