CACINA

FRIDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

FRIDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Isaiah Chapter 48 verses 17-19 / Psalm 1 verses 1-4, & 6  Matthew Chapter 11 verses 16-19.

Friends, we are never really satisfied, are we? It is so much easier for us to point fingers towards others. We blame others for our problems, never really addressing our concerns to ourselves. It’s always everybody’s else’s fault, but mine! Does this sound familiar? It sure does to me. When we point a finger at someone, there are three others pointing back at us. How by our example will we simply show who we are? It is not for the purposes of trying to prove to people who we are, if so then we missed the point. It is by our example by being living witnesses of Gods word, and by this then we are made blameless in the sight of God. Be blessed.

+ Michael Theogene

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THURSDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

THURSDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Isaiah Chapter 41 verses 13-20 / Psalm 145 verses 1 & 9 -13AB  Matthew Chapter 11 verses 11-15.

Sisters and brothers, during this meditation, I wish to briefly tell you of a friend of mine who is suffering from the usual vision loss that most older adults are beginning to have.  Glaucoma, cornea repair, night blindness, macular degeneration and among many others.  This is not necessarily pertaining to my friend but shows what we all possibly may suffer from as we get older. Does this sound familiar? On this day is the memorial of Saint Lucy, virgin & martyr is celebrated is the reason why I bring this friend of mine up. St. Lucy’s cause, if you will, was for improved eye sight, better vision. Physical vision! My friend just received surgery in one eye and will receive surgery in the other in the next few days as the first eye heals. I myself, never having any eye conditions as such, I can only imagine the fear of only being able to use one eye as he has found challenging. Balance issues and all of the sought. The same with those among us who at birth or at a later time who have lost their ability to fully see, physically.

 However, as it has been said, as you lose the ability of one of the senses, your other ones become heightened. So, if we had lost the ability to see, would our hearing take over to a certain extent?  

Who is the person or persons that we have seen or heard about in our lives that have lost the ability to function in an area of their lives, and have responded be something greater than they already are? To be not only great, but spectacular? As Jesus was possibly a disciple of John worshiping in the same community, who’s name do we call out? To be a prophetic voice may not be for everyone, but we all have a voice to a certain extent. Also, without passing the buck, who calls out our name?  Will our voice be heard and remembered as we challenge others and ourselves? Who sees and hears us? Who really sees and hears the  message of God we are proclaiming through whatever it is we learned to compensate for in our lives.

(rev.) Michael Theogene

Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe- Fr. Vincent Treglio of Sts. Francis and Clare

TUESDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

TUESDAY OF THE SECOND WEEK OF ADVENT

Inclusive Lectionary reading: Isaiah Chapter 40 verses 1-11 / Psalm 96 verses 1-3 & 10AC, 11-13 /  Matthew Chapter 18 verses 12-14.

 

Who in our lives have we dropped everything for? Have we ever reached out to find a teacher or friend in our past who made a difference in our lives? When have we reached out for the one? Sisters and brothers, we have to remember that sometimes in our lives we have to be mindful that the one person who may be missed, neglected, suffering, or forgotten among us needs to be recognized. We need to be the light that leads them out of the darkness. If we have their permission, and if appropriate, we can help guide those among us who may not only be lost, but forgotten, bullied, those suffering from mental and emotional illness, and those lonely who have no one to turn to.  Sometimes the need of the one can outweighs the needs of many.  Others in society may have a different opinion about who are worthy. Society has created a “throw away” culture for who they decide do not fit in.   What happened to  “we are all children of God”?  God is in everyone not just who we decide.

+ Michael Theogene

SOLEMNITY OF THE IMMACULATE CONCEPTION OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

Inclusive Lectionary Text

Genesis Chapter 3 verses 9-15, 20 / Psalm 98: 1, 2-3AB, 3CD-4 / Ephesians Chapter 1 verses 3-6, 11-12 / Luke Chapter 1 verses 26-38

 

What an inspiration Mary is in so many ways.  A woman of great faith willing to say “yes” to the unknown.  A true leader to follow, a feminist who paved the way for the future.  Are we willing to say that unconditional “yes”? I think of those who are married, parents, teachers, the ordained, and many others. What was our “yes” moment in our lives that enabled us to make a difference in ourselves or for society? Be blessed!   

+ Michael Theogene

A New Look at Original Sin

Posted in Christianity, forgiveness, grace, Original Sin, redemption, Romans chapter 5, scripture, Uncategorized by Rev. Martha on February 25, 2018

This is based on Pope Benedict XVI’s teaching from Dec. 3,’08, using the 5th chapter of Paul’s letter to the Romans, which “traces the basic outlines of original sin”.

Very briefly, this is what St. Paul wrote: Through one person (Adam) sin entered the world, and through sin, judgment/death/ condemnation came to all people. But the free gift of God’s grace and the gift (for a sinless person to die willingly at the hands of sinful people) that came from one man (Jesus) were not like Adam’s sin. Adam’s one sin brought punishment to all, but Christ makes us right with God, so that all can live.   For if by that one person’s sin all died, how much more did the grace of God and the gracious gift of Christ overflow and abound for all. Where sin increased, grace overflowed all the more. The sin of one person caused death to be king over all, but all who accept God’s abundant grace and forgiveness are kings of life because of the one person, Jesus Christ.

The focus is not so much that sin entered the world when the 1st humans disobeyed God and lost the grace of holiness they were give at creation. The focus, then, is that Jesus Christ came to redeem/ justify/acquit us (commercial/theological/legal). God’s grace was abundantly showered upon humanity.”

The dogma of original sin is inseparable from and absolutely connected to the dogma of salvation and freedom in Christ. We should never consider the sin of Adam and of humankind without understanding it in the context of justification in Christ, the Pope said. There would have been no need for redemption by Jesus unless there was sin. On Easter we say, “O happy fault, O necessary sin of Adam, which gained for us so great a Redeemer!”

As proof of original sin, the Pope said, “On the one hand we know we must do good, and in our inner selves this is what we desire, yet at the same time we feel an impulse to do the opposite, to follow the path of egoism, of violence, to do only what we enjoy even though we know that this means working against good, against God and against our fellow man. St. Paul wrote, (Romans 7:15) “For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate.” This inner contradiction of our being is not a theory but fact.  “The power of evil in the heart and history of humankind is undeniable.”

This makes evil appear normal to us.   “This contradiction of mankind, of our history, must provoke and bring out the desire of redemption.” “In politics,” the Pope remarked, “everyone speaks of the need to change the world, to create a more just world. This is an expression of the desire that there be liberation from the contradiction that we experience in ourselves.” Were we “hard wired” with both good and evil with us?   Are we inherently contradictory? NO!

“The faith tells us that there are not two principles, one good and one evil. There is only one principle, which is God the Creator, and God is solely good, without shadow of evil. Neither are human beings a mix of good and evil. The human being as such is good. “This is the joyful announcement of the faith: there is but one source, a source of good, the Creator, and for this reason, life, too, is good.

“There is also a mystery of darkness, which does not arise from the source of being, it is not original. Evil arises from created freedom, a freedom that has been abused,” Benedict XVI said. “How has this happened? It remains unclear. Evil is not logical. Only God and goodness are logical, only they are light. Evil remains a mystery.”

“It remains a mystery of darkness, of night. But there is immediately added a mystery of light. Evil arises from a subordinate (lesser) source; God with His light is stronger. For this reason evil can be overcome, for this reason the creature, man, is curable.” “Man is not only curable but is in fact cured. God introduced the cure. God personally entered history and, to counteract the permanent source of evil, placed a source of pure good: Christ crucified and risen, the “New Adam” who “opposes the foul river of evil with a river of light.”

The dark night of evil is still strong. Together we pray: Come Jesus; come, give strength to the light and to the good; come where dishonesty, ignorance of God, violence and injustice dominate; come, Lord Jesus, give strength to the good in the world and help us to be bearers of your light, workers of peace, witnesses of truth. Come Lord Jesus!”     Amen