CACINA

Homily-June 3, 2018, Feast of the Body and Blood of Christ

body and blood 2It seems throughout all history, human beings always had a sense of a higher power or God or gods to whom they offered worship and sacrifice, especially so that they would have good times in their lives. They would offer up first crops or a lamb or a calf or something of value to them. Sacrifice of animals was common, and was done by the Jews also. In those past times, we must remember that they saw blood as the center and soul of life as without it nothing could live. That is why our first reading is so graphic withbod and blood 1 Moses taking bowls of blood from the young bulls offered up and splashing half on the altar representing the invisible God and sprinkled the other half on the people .That act was to seal the special bond God had with his people. As you can imagine, sacrificing of animals was a messy thin with he blood and slaughtering of animals.

body and blood 3This brings us to the Last Supper and Jesus shared his last meal with his disciples. He was well aware that this was his last meal and time with his disciples, and knowing that he was about to die and be the one true sacrifice and offering to God in and everlasting covenant, As the Divine and human sacrifice, he gave for all to come a way to share in the sacrifice of his death and resurrection by giving them His Body and His Blood in the form of bread and wine. All generations to come, have the Eucharist as a sign of the covenant sealed and body and blood 4given by Christ. To eat his body and drink his blood might sound strange to some, but it a special food for the journey we all undertake in life and it is nourishment that joins us with the Father and enlivens our life with the Holy Spirit. It unites us all to one another and hopefully leads us to share the love that God has given and continues with the Eucharist and the sacraments. All of our works and sharing should proclaim God’s love and the acclamation: “Christ has died, Christ is risen, Christ will come again.’

Advertisements

A New Look at Original Sin

Posted in Christianity, forgiveness, grace, Original Sin, redemption, Romans chapter 5, scripture, Uncategorized by Rev. Martha on February 25, 2018

This is based on Pope Benedict XVI’s teaching from Dec. 3,’08, using the 5th chapter of Paul’s letter to the Romans, which “traces the basic outlines of original sin”.

Very briefly, this is what St. Paul wrote: Through one person (Adam) sin entered the world, and through sin, judgment/death/ condemnation came to all people. But the free gift of God’s grace and the gift (for a sinless person to die willingly at the hands of sinful people) that came from one man (Jesus) were not like Adam’s sin. Adam’s one sin brought punishment to all, but Christ makes us right with God, so that all can live.   For if by that one person’s sin all died, how much more did the grace of God and the gracious gift of Christ overflow and abound for all. Where sin increased, grace overflowed all the more. The sin of one person caused death to be king over all, but all who accept God’s abundant grace and forgiveness are kings of life because of the one person, Jesus Christ.

The focus is not so much that sin entered the world when the 1st humans disobeyed God and lost the grace of holiness they were give at creation. The focus, then, is that Jesus Christ came to redeem/ justify/acquit us (commercial/theological/legal). God’s grace was abundantly showered upon humanity.”

The dogma of original sin is inseparable from and absolutely connected to the dogma of salvation and freedom in Christ. We should never consider the sin of Adam and of humankind without understanding it in the context of justification in Christ, the Pope said. There would have been no need for redemption by Jesus unless there was sin. On Easter we say, “O happy fault, O necessary sin of Adam, which gained for us so great a Redeemer!”

As proof of original sin, the Pope said, “On the one hand we know we must do good, and in our inner selves this is what we desire, yet at the same time we feel an impulse to do the opposite, to follow the path of egoism, of violence, to do only what we enjoy even though we know that this means working against good, against God and against our fellow man. St. Paul wrote, (Romans 7:15) “For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate.” This inner contradiction of our being is not a theory but fact.  “The power of evil in the heart and history of humankind is undeniable.”

This makes evil appear normal to us.   “This contradiction of mankind, of our history, must provoke and bring out the desire of redemption.” “In politics,” the Pope remarked, “everyone speaks of the need to change the world, to create a more just world. This is an expression of the desire that there be liberation from the contradiction that we experience in ourselves.” Were we “hard wired” with both good and evil with us?   Are we inherently contradictory? NO!

“The faith tells us that there are not two principles, one good and one evil. There is only one principle, which is God the Creator, and God is solely good, without shadow of evil. Neither are human beings a mix of good and evil. The human being as such is good. “This is the joyful announcement of the faith: there is but one source, a source of good, the Creator, and for this reason, life, too, is good.

“There is also a mystery of darkness, which does not arise from the source of being, it is not original. Evil arises from created freedom, a freedom that has been abused,” Benedict XVI said. “How has this happened? It remains unclear. Evil is not logical. Only God and goodness are logical, only they are light. Evil remains a mystery.”

“It remains a mystery of darkness, of night. But there is immediately added a mystery of light. Evil arises from a subordinate (lesser) source; God with His light is stronger. For this reason evil can be overcome, for this reason the creature, man, is curable.” “Man is not only curable but is in fact cured. God introduced the cure. God personally entered history and, to counteract the permanent source of evil, placed a source of pure good: Christ crucified and risen, the “New Adam” who “opposes the foul river of evil with a river of light.”

The dark night of evil is still strong. Together we pray: Come Jesus; come, give strength to the light and to the good; come where dishonesty, ignorance of God, violence and injustice dominate; come, Lord Jesus, give strength to the good in the world and help us to be bearers of your light, workers of peace, witnesses of truth. Come Lord Jesus!”     Amen