Saturday after Ash Wednesday (February 17, 2018)

Inclusive Lectionary Text

Readings: Isaiah Chapter 58 verses 9-14 / Psalm 86 verses 1-6 / Luke Chapter 5 verses 27-32

Friends, as we all remember recently in our political climate, especially for the last presidential race, how we were all making disparaging remarks. Mostly everyone was at opposite ends on who should be the next president. Whether you were Republican, Democrat, or Independent, etc., it was hard at times to hold a conversation without beginning to reach at someone’s throat. People found it easier to only speak politics with those who agreed with their thoughts of view.  What good was that?

Sisters and brothers, I don’t profess to have been perfect at this, but I think I may have done better than some, certain times. At work, where my office was divided on both sides and on multiple issues, I recall that we would have conversations on issues in a peaceful manner. What I remember most was that we would force ourselves to do it in a patient manner giving time for the one speaking to really voice their concerns. Besides me, other co-workers would help facilitate this. Sure we had at least one or two who were really fiery and at odds with everyone else, but we managed to do it.

Where is the middle ground? All our intentions should have moral values and the focus should be “What is best for our people, not our party”. We are not going to be able to get everything we want. Can we find compromise? Can we listen to the other who has a different point of view? Is it possible that I may learn something different and perhaps open my mind or add more information to what I may know already?

We can’t just stay with those who just think like us. We have to go not only to the ones we feel comfortable with, but also to the ones we do not agree with. No one person or party is to blame, we all are sinners, we are all virtuous, we are all righteous and yes, we are all called to repentance. A change of not only heart, but also of mind and then and maybe then we not only focus on big stuff or little stuff but on everything that needs our attention.

This seems that what I have said does not go with the readings but I believe it does.  We all need a “physician”. Let’s stop blaming others. Maybe we have no one else to blame but ourselves for allowing the things that go on. Maybe something to think about?  What do you think? Lenten Blessings!

rev. Michael Theogene


Friday after Ash Wednesday (February 16, 2018)

Inclusive Lectionary Text

Readings: Isaiah Chapter 58 verses 1-9 / Psalm 51 verses 1-4, 16-17 / Matthew Chapter 9 verses 14-15

Friends, what is it that God simply requires of us? I think what God requires of us is to love and do justice. We are called to live in the present moment and to be grateful for what we have now, and to celebrate what God has given us. We need to be mindful of those in our lives and not take them for granted, regretting it after they are gone,

So often we are complacent, doing nothing. It is time for us to be mindful and by prayer to listen what it is God is asking us to do.

When tragedy hits, like those who lost their lives and the injured in South Florida, caused by the lack of love resulting in gun violence,  too often we have seen this in our nation. Whether directly or indirectly we are all affected and want to find something to do to make it better. Wanting to go there and help, donating money to a “Go Fund Me” page, giving blood. We all mourn with those innocently lost. We feel helpless yet even a simple prayer could be what is required.

rev. Michael Theogene

Thursday after Ash Wednesday (February 15, 2018)

Inclusive Lectionary Text

Readings: Deuteronomy Chapter 30 verses 15-20 / Psalm 1 verses 1-4, 6 / Luke Chapter 9 verses 22-25

Sisters and Brothers, we know what happens to us when we get out of sync. We get out of touch, maybe becoming complacent drifting away from God at times. We lose our steps but eventually find ourselves back on track again. As our readings tell us, it is a matter of life and death in choosing life we are prosperous. Happiness to delight in God is by remaining in conversation with God knowing that God’s justice is really God’s mercy and compassion. God wishes to continue the conversation, never forsaking us leaving us to our own failures, if we choose it.

I am reminded by family and friends who are in recovery when I am present as a support member. As I have attended past celebratory meetings when a coin is attained, at the end of the meeting when all gather together embracing each other, shoulder to shoulder, the following is recited “Keep on coming back. It works if you work it, you’re worth it. Keep coming back.” After all, it’s kind of hard for God to keep a one way conversation going. Do the step work, talk to God!  Do the steps. It doesn’t require much. You may not be in recovery but allow God to challenge you, it works.

rev. Michael Theogene

Homily February 18, 2018- the 1st Sunday of Lent

1lent1Over the years we have learned that living in the middle east, the culture was tribal and family centered. A person’s home town was like an anchor or stake that centered or protected a person in a world where a single or unattached person was seen to be in danger. We see today in the gospel and from the last few weeks, that Jesus has left Nazareth. He has encountered John the Baptist(and been baptized, but not in Mark’s gospel) and now we see Mark say the Spirit drove Jesus into the desert. In Mark, there is kind of urgency for Jesus to get to the desert. It is as if in those forty days, Jesus was communing and preparing with a different1lent3 family. Spiritually he was preparing his ministry, being attended by the angels and in his new family meeting Satan and what that entailed. Perhaps, his first encounter with Satan away from the protection of his earthly family. But with his time of preparation done and John having been arrested, Jesus went to Galilee and began to preach: “This is the time of fulfillment. The kingdom of God is at hand. Repent, and believe in the gospel.”

As we ponder that today, I would like to say we all have busy schedules and not a whole lot of time for lent. But most of you have smart phone and tablets or computers and email. I would suggest for lent that you can get the daily Mass readings for lent in an email every day simply by signing up at the catholic bishops site on-line. It is free and you can read it where ever you read your email. In this way you can receive a thought each day as Easter approaches. The link is below.1lent6


Inclusive Lectionary- Joel Chapter 2 verses 12-18 / Psalm 51 / 2 Corinthians Chapter 5 verses 20- Chapter 6 verse 2 / Matthew Chapter 6 verses 1-6, 16-18

Friends, we hear the message of prayers, fasting and alms giving every lent. For good reasons because it invites us to check ourselves as a yearly reminder that it’s not all about me but about all of us. God shows us continually to leave our egos at the door. Sisters and brothers, God reminds us that we can’t do it alone. We can’t only be about me and not the other person. It also does not mean for us to solely rely on others or have others rely on us alone. God is speaking as God has continually spoken to send the message as often as God repeatedly does, that without God, we can do nothing.

God who is non-pressuring, who wants to be fully engulfed, engaged in all matter of being, wants us to know that, yes, God is present, whether we want God or not. If we do wish to meet God where God meets us, at any level, we will find God waiting to embrace us to be one with God.

As hectic as life becomes, even if we may have felt drawn away, it is never too late to reconnect with the source of all being. Lenten Blessings, God bless!

rev. Michael Theogene

Homily at Holy Trinity on February 11, 2018- the 6th Sunday in Ordinary time

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Homily, February 4, 2018-the 5th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in Called, christian, Christianity, Faith, homily, inspirational, religion, scripture, Spirit, Word by Fr Joe R on February 2, 2018

5sun1In the gospel, we see Jesus leave the Synagogue and go to Peter’s house. Peter’s mother-in-law is sick with a fever and Jesus heals her and helps her up. She then waits on Jesus and his disciples. After sundown when the sabbath ends, the sick from the town start to come to Jesus to be healed. The following morning, Jesus arose early and set out alone in 5sun2the desert. Later when his disciples caught up, he said it was time to move on. He said he had not come to heal, but to teach the word of God. So he continued on. Jesus, more than any of us was aware of a mission, of a reason he was 5 sun3here. Unlike ourselves, he avoided distractions and continued his journey. His life, his service, his love left much for his disciples and followers who followed and came after him to do and imitate. His journey was to give his message to the whole world and so it has been for his followers. But the world today is not perfect, nor has it been in any century. The twentieth century, the last one, was filled with war and ugliness that people could impose on their peers. Violence, and war seems to be a part of what people are. But why? People are kind and loving with their own, why not beyond the family and the boundaries of town and country. Jesus taught who was our neighbor, and ultimately our neighbor is the one who can express love and care for others. Everything we do for a neighbor, a brother or sister, we do for a loving, unifying reason. More 5 sun4

than anything, we are called to reach out to the Jobs of this world. Even in our time there are those filled with despair and the drudgery of daily life. They need our support and help. We should reach out and offer a hand, a word, some solace. After all, we all have a bad time a some point or another. None of us can do it alone without God’s help and those around us.

Homily for the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time At Sts Francis and Clare Parish, Ft. Lauderdale, Fl.

Posted in Called, christian, Christianity, Communion, Faith, homily, inspirational, scripture, Spirit, Word by Fr Joe R on January 28, 2018

Homily January 28, 2018 the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time at Holy Trinity Parish, Herndon, Va

Posted in Called, christian, Christianity, Eucharist, Faith, homily, inspirational, saints, Spirit, Uncategorized by Fr Joe R on January 28, 2018

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Homily January 28, 2018-the 4th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in Called, christian, Christianity, Faith, homily, inspirational, religion, scripture, Spirit by Fr Joe R on January 26, 2018

4sun 1I want to take a look at what St Paul’s letter said this morning. It seems that in many ways he seems to criticize everybody. He says being single means that a person is free to be concerned about things of the Lord. Married people, he says, are concerned about their spouse and things of the world. Yet in the very beginning of Genesis, we see God say 

4sun 2it is not good for a person to be alone. In fact, Christ made marriage a Sacrament because it is the very normal and spiritual way that most are called to follow Christ to salvation. It is a partnership of love centered in Christ. Certainly married couples have troubles and all the problems of the world, but you know single people have problems too. Being single does give more time, but being alone, childless is not always the gift he makes it seem. Further he seems to imply that married people are less spiritual than single people. It is just not true, as there are multitudes of holy and 4sun 3spiritual married people. For some reason, the church through the centuries has focused on the single people, the religious, the clerics. But let’s be honest, the church is made up of all the baptized. Sanctity and sainthood comes for all who live their lives in the faith and love of Jesus Christ.

So, to sum up, I would say we should realize that the married person, and the single person(whether lay, religious or clergy) reflect God’s love in different ways and different paths. Yet, truly, God has made each of us individually and calls us each individually, except those who are married, he has said that then two have become one flesh.