CACINA

Homily for the 20th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C (August 14)

Posted in Uncategorized by Fr. Ron Stephens on August 10, 2016

Homily for the Twentieth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C  (August 14)

Jeremiah was not a particularly well-liked prophet. Doom and gloom one might say. We are told in the first reading that he was demoralizing the Hebrew troops. The reason they say this, which comes just before our reading today, is that Jeremiah was telling everyone to get out of the city. They couldn’t and wouldn’t win. Babylon was going to overtake them.

Now we have to remember that prophets speak only what God has told them to speak, but they were only hearing the human message of doom. The princes in charge of the army wanted him out of the way before he scared all the soldiers and they took off.

The King, apparently, didn’t agree with his princes, so he gave in to them, by telling them to do whatever they wanted with Jeremiah. Unfortunately, or fortunately for Jeremiah, they threw him into a dry well, into the mud. He didn’t drown but he would soon starve for there was no way out.

One of the officers of the King felt that that was a horrible way to die, to starve to death, and he reported what the princes had done to Jeremiah to the King. The King had mercy on Jeremiah and had him taken out of the well. What we don’t hear int he reading is that the King kept Jeremiah under guard, and did not let him run free.

The King here is compared to God in the Psalm today. Jeremiah waited patiently in the cistern. The Psalmist sings: God drew me up from the desolate pit, out of the miry bog, and set my feet upon a rock, making my steps secure.

The lesson? God is our deliverer who will have mercy on us in our great need or distress and will help us. But there might be a delay, as there was in both the Jeremiah story and the Psalm. Our prayers are not always answered immediately.

As we see in the second reading today, Jesus also had patience, enduring the cross and disregarding the shame of dying such a despised death. Jesus is the role model of patience even in great suffering, so, as St. Paul says, we must just continue to persevere and run the race that is set before us, confident that God will hear our prayer.

Now how does all this relate to the “fire and brimstone” Gospel we have today which is probably out of our comfort zone. We have to remember that Jesus was not all apple pie and lovey-dovey! Jesus too was prophetic and was telling us the things that God the Father had given him to see. Like Jeremiah, Jesus is telling us that we are going to have quite a time of it in the world. Jesus and the religion he preaches will bring division, division in households, division in families, divisions in nations. This prophecy as we know from history is certainly true. Even within the religious communities there has been and is division. Families have been divided over religion, particularly in marriage. There is division in our nation today, and we are fooling ourselves if we don’t think that religion is at the base of much of it. Jesus saw all that. He knew it was coming. He told us it was coming. He has brought fire to the earth, he says. And he was, of course, right.

Imagine how that must have made Jesus feel, preaching the kingdom of God and love for neighbor – to know what it would bring. Jesus says, “I have a baptism with which to be baptized, and what stress I am under until it is completed.” Now remember, that this section of Luke for the last weeks has been the journey to Jerusalem, to Jesus’ death. Luke uses Jesus’ saying here to emphasize that journey to his death.

Jesus also says that he “came to bring fire to the earth”, which is his prophetic vision. But fire has many meanings in Scriptural tradition.

It can mean pain and burning, but it can also mean judgment, purification and the even the Holy Spirit. Surprisingly, this reading is cut short today and we don’t get the next section where Jesus says that we can look at the sky and predict the weather (he obviously was not speaking about DC weather reports), but they can’t see the signs from God in the present time.

This was true of most of the prophets who said things to allow people to see and hear the things which they were blind to.

Do we see the signs that God sends us to today? Do we listen to the prophets that he sends us today? And how do we tell if someone is a false prophet? The signs of the times today are very scary. I am frightened for us, for our town, for our nation. I think there are voices of prophets out there, trying to show us the right path, but we need to constantly pray that we hear them, and do the hard things they demand to make our world a better lace. First and foremost is Christ himself, and we need to read and hear his words more than ever before. I ask you to take some time each day to read the Gospels and meditate on Jesus’ words. Remember, they are the words of eternal life.

This is about as “fire and brimstone-y”as I ever get in a homily, but my words are inspired by Jesus’ words today – still Good News if we listen to what he says!

God bless us all.

Ronald Stephens

Bishop of Holy Trinity Diocese and pastor of St. Andrew’s Cathedral Parish

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[Volume 3 (Luke) of Bishop Ron’s homilies, one for every Sunday and Feast from the last Cycle C, is available from amazon.com for $9.99 – “Teaching the Church Year”]

Homily at Holy Trinity Parish August 7, 2016 the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in Called, christian, Faith, homily, inspirational, religion, saints, Spirit, Word by Fr Joe R on August 7, 2016

Homily for August 7, 2016, the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted in Called, christian, Christianity, Communion, Faith, forgiveness, homily, religion, scripture, Spirit, Word by Fr Joe R on August 4, 2016

19 sunToday’s first 2 readings talk of faith and the realization of thing hoped for and evidence of things not seen. I think most of us have received our faith from our families and growing up maybe even took it for granted. In all our lives, I think there has been a moment or time when we faced the reality of belief and Jesus head on. All have met the challenge of the unseen, the darkness of the unknown, the lack of clarity of what the future is to bring, relying on the words of Jesus and the promise of loving God and neighbor and what it will bring. 19 sun 2Abraham certainly had no clear picture or even an understanding that Sarah could have a child. Yet he went out, he did what he was called to do. And so it is with our own faith, that we are called, to believe to meet each day, to accept the challenge to love. Most of all faith means to trust. Trust is for some a hard word because it asks that we place our judgment, ourselves in the hands of another. Hebrews points out the combination and the remarkableness of it. Throughout the centuries, we see the faith of many proclaimed in the church. Yet, I would point out today a woman of our own time, Mother Teresa of Calcutta. We have heard of her extraordinary work, yet unknown in her lifetime, was the feeling of separation or loneliness or darkness, have experienced a call to an explicit mission, yet never feeling any further contact. Yet, she 19 sun 4lived out a life of hard work, never losing her trust. If perhaps you might be interested, while it is a Hollywood movie, The movie “The Letters” available on many of the different services does convey a remarkable life of this woman who was contemporary to us. It shows Faith and love is a journey, and for each it is different, god loves us and relates as best and how he wants to. But his love never leaves us.

Homily for the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C (Aug. 7)

Posted in Uncategorized by Fr. Ron Stephens on August 2, 2016

Homily for the Nineteenth Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year C  (August 7)

These are the three most difficult readings we have had in many weeks, and making sense of them might prove to be a real challenge.

One of the criticisms I heard about the horrendous killings in the Orlando nightclub weeks ago when the powers that be set out to discover just how it happened and why, was that the federal officials, the FBI,  knew about the killer, Mateen, and had him on a list, and also were also informed by the owner of the place where he bought the assault rifles that something dangerous might be going on. The criticism was that the authorities  knew and did nothing about it.

Even his wife apparently knew but did nothing about it.

Our Scripture today is all about knowing and doing something about it, or not doing something about it.

The reading from Wisdom is greatly out of context and as such might make little sense to people on a first reading or hearing. But the background is this. God told the Hebrews who were slaves in Egypt that he was going to do something to cause the Egyptians to let them go. The writer says that the “deliverance from Egypt was made known beforehand to our ancestors.” And why did God let them know? Wisdom says because God wanted them to rejoice in their expectation of what God would do, the sure knowledge that he would keep his word and they would be delivered. They had to act on that knowledge, however, God issued orders of how they were to prepare a final meal, how their houses would be protected, and so on. Those who listened to God were spared the Egyptian fate and were released from their bondage. The then is a story of foreknowledge that was acted on, and the Hebrews were successful.

While the Hebrews listened and had faith in their God, that God would be true to his word, St. Paul today also takes about faith in God. He first gives a definition of faith: it is the assurance, the confidence, we have that something we wish for would happen, even though we do not have concrete knowledge. Paul uses Abraham and his wife Sarah as great examples of people who had faith because they were told that something would happen, and without any proof of it, lived their lives expecting it to happen. They too took action on that foreknowledge. God told Abraham that he would father many nations, but he was a nomad, unsettled. He set out, not knowing where he was going, but had faith that God would get him there. Similarly, Sarah was old and barren, yet God said there would be many children in his line. Sarah also had faith in the pre-knowledge God gave them, and eventually had a child. My point is again that God lets us know what will happen, and some of us have the faith to live out our lives knowing that it will. We take action accordingly.

In the shorter Gospel account today we also hear Jesus giving us foreknowledge of events. He tells us that God is preparing the kingdom of heaven for us and that secondly, the Son of Man will be coming in judgment. As Catholics, we have faith that this is the case and we are asked to act on that faith. Unlike the people in Orlando who may have had pre-knowledge but chose not to act on it, we do not want to be in that position.

Jesus, the consummate storyteller, speaks a parable to explain this. But before he does, he also gives concrete ideas on what should be done because of this pre- knowledge – sell your possessions, give to the poor and needy even if that means self-sacrifice.

The first parable then is of a master of a house coming home from a wedding feast. The pre-knowledge is that they know he is coming. What the servants don’t know is when. When he returns he finds that the servants have stayed awake and kept watch and the Master is so pleased with them that he does what? He sits them down and serves them dinner himself. The master becomes a servant to the servants as a reward.

The second parable is not as positive. The pre- knowledge was that there were thieves in the area that came at night. Knowing this, the servants and master should have taken steps to protect the house and everyone should have taken their duties very carefully. The fact that they didn’t caused a robbery. In this case, the foreknowledge was not acted upon with bad results.

How does all of this apply to us today and this week? We have foreknowledge of a number of things that we as Catholics take on faith – that the soul lives on, that there is a kingdom of God, that a good life will be rewarded, that we must do things to prepare for our deaths – like almsgiving and love of neighbor. The question we must ask ourselves is if our faith that Christ is telling the truth leads us to act on what we know. It is easy to just sit back and say I’ll see what happens, but even though we know we are going to die, we don’t know when. Even though we know Christ will come again, we don’t know when. Will we be ready or will we be sitting and waiting or even sleeping? The parables and the readings today are a wake-up call, that these things are going to happen, let’s take action to prepare for it!

And this is the Good News that Jesus reminds us of today for those who live by and through their faith in God’s word.

Ronald Stephens

Bishop of Holy Trinity Diocese and pastor of St. Andrew’s Cathedral Parish

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[Volume 3 (Luke) of Bishop Ron’s homilies, one for every Sunday and Feast from the last Cycle C, is available from amazon.com for $9.99 – “Teaching the Church Year”]