CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on June 19, 2014

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 6:7-15

“In praying, do not babble like the pagans, who think that they will be heard because of their many words. Do not be like them. Your Father knows what you need before you ask him.

“This is how you are to pray:

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name,
thy Kingdom come,
thy will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread;
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us;
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

“If you forgive men their transgressions, your heavenly Father will forgive you. But if you do not forgive men, neither will your Father forgive your transgressions.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Several times during the course of the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus makes the point that what we put out in the world is what will come back to us. Jesus here says that the forgiveness we give will be the forgiveness we receive. A little after this he observes that the judgments we pronounce on others will be the judgment we receive. And a few verses later he asks us to treat others as we would be treated. Jesus is saying that if we want a forgiving, merciful, and considerate world, we must be the change we seek, for in the end, what we put into the world is what is in the world.

Saint of the day: Romuald was born in Ravenna, Italy in about 951. He was Italian nobility who spent a wild youth. Acting as second, he witnessed his father kill another man in a duel, and sought to atone for the crime by becoming a Benedictine monk at Classe, Italy.

He served as abbot from 996 to 999. A wanderer, he established several hermitage and monasteries in central and northern Italy. He tried to evangelize the Slavs, but met with little success. Romuald founded the Camaldolese Benedictines and spent the last fourteen years of his life in seclusion at Mount Sitria, Bifolco, and Val di Castro. He was the spiritual teacher of Saint Wolfgang. He died June 19. 1027 at Val-di-Castro, Italy of natural causes.

Spiritual reading: Loving your neighbor means living in voluntary poverty, stripping yourself, putting off the old Adam, denying yourself, etc. It also means non-participation in those comforts and luxuries which have been manufactured by the exploitation of others. While our brothers and sisters suffer, we must be compassionate with them, suffer with them. While they suffer from lack of necessities, we will refuse to enjoy comforts.

These resolutions, no matter how hard they are to live up to, no matter how often we fail and have to begin over again, are part of the Vision. And we must keep this vision in mind, recognize the truth of it, the necessity for it, even though we do not, cannot, live up to it…though in our execution we may fall short of the mark over and over. St. Paul says it is by little and by little that we proceed. (“Meditations” by Dorothy Day)

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