CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on April 4, 2014

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Gospel reading of the day:

John 7:1-2, 10, 25-30

Jesus moved about within Galilee; he did not wish to travel in Judea, because the Jews were trying to kill him. But the Jewish feast of Tabernacles was near.

But when his brothers had gone up to the feast, he himself also went up, not openly but as it were in secret.

Some of the inhabitants of Jerusalem said, “Is he not the one they are trying to kill? And look, he is speaking openly and they say nothing to him. Could the authorities have realized that he is the Christ? But we know where he is from. When the Christ comes, no one will know where he is from.” So Jesus cried out in the temple area as he was teaching and said, “You know me and also know where I am from. Yet I did not come on my own, but the one who sent me, whom you do not know, is true. I know him, because I am from him, and he sent me.” So they tried to arrest him, but no one laid a hand upon him, because his hour had not yet come.

Reflection on the gospel reading: The Word became flesh and dwelt among us: not a whispered or an ignored word but a Word that cries out loud in public places. A Word so loud and obvious that it itself is evidence that the truth cannot be contained. This word may suffer a season and perhaps even in desultory moments seem to be in retreat, but the truth will have its out because the truth cannot be long hidden. The chief priests and the leaders of the people may endeavor to contain Jesus, but they cannot, for Jesus is not Jesus if he keeps his message to himself. The Word of God cannot be silent.

Saint of the day: The Servant of God Michael Koodalloor was born in July 1913 as the sixth child of George Itticheriah and Anna in the family of Koodalloor in Kottappuram, Thrissur, India. His pet name was Michaelooti. Michael entered into the Capuchin Ashram and made his first profession taking the name Theophane in 1934. He was subsequently ordained a priest by the Bishop of Ajmer. He was well known for his Fr._Theophinecounseling, house blessings, house visits, and healings through prayers. The sermons of Fr. Theophane were often simple, brief and matter of fact; he had an unusual gift of speech to lift his listeners to the heights of lofty thoughts. He was the coordinator of the Mission Retreat team. As a preacher of mission retreats, Fr. Theophane’s words had a power to purify the listeners’ hearts as if in the burning heat of a crucible. He employed an economy of word in his speeches; and he spoke only what was necessary and essential. He preached more by his life than by his lips and tongue. His spirit of poverty and mortification was the source of his forceful preaching. Fr. Theophane was a dedicated confessor who spent 10 years of his life at St. Bonaventure Capuchin Friary at Ponnurunni/

Fr. Theophane had an enthralling personality, and no one who met him even once was able to forget him. One Capuchin friar observed that when he joined the monastery, he felt no sorrow or loneliness because of the love and warmth of Fr. Theophane’s presence. He extended his kindness to the poor and the sorrowful. He helped in the kitchen by washing the plates and cleaning the fish. He slept and ate minimally, he was ever ready to do any service to others. For almost 20 years of his life, he was afflicted with various diseases that he suffered joyfully–with a smile on his face. He died April 4, 1968. His cause for beatification was initiated in 2007.

Spiritual reading: And I saw that truly nothing happens by accident or luck, but everything by God’s wise providence. If it seems to be accident or luck from our point of view, our blindness and lack of foreknowledge is the cause; for matters that have been in God’s foreseeing wisdom since before time began befall us suddenly, all unawares; and so in our blindness and ignorance we say that this is accident or luck, but to our Lord God it is not so. (Dame Juliana of Norwich)

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