CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on March 26, 2014

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 5:17-19

Jesus said to his disciples: “Do not think that I have come to abolish the law or the prophets. I have come not to abolish but to fulfill. Amen, I say to you, until heaven and earth pass away, not the smallest letter or the smallest part of a letter will pass from the law, until all things have taken place. Therefore, whoever breaks one of the least of these commandments and teaches others to do so will be called least in the Kingdom of heaven. But whoever obeys and teaches these commandments will be called greatest in the Kingdom of heaven.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Jesus says he does not come to abolish either the law or the prophets, but to fulfill them. He comes not to downgrade the law but to transcend it. Jesus in the passages that follow this one provides six examples of how the law seems to demand a particular behavior which Jesus explains refer specifically to interior dispositions. So it is not sufficient for example that we not kill; we are called to reconciliation. When Jesus starts his ministry, the scribes and Pharisees in their mastery of an outward practice represent the ideal form of obedience to the law and the prophets, but Jesus teaches that true observance of the law is entirely an affair of the heart.

Saint of the day: Born in 1556 as Margaret Middleton at York, England, Margaret Clitherow was the daughter of Thomas and Jane Middleton, a candle maker and the Sheriff of York for two years. Raised Anglican, she married John Clitherow, a wealthy butcher and chamberlain of the city of York, in July 1571. She converted to Catholicism around 1574.

She was imprisoned several times for her conversion, sheltering priests (including her husband’s brother), and permitting the celebration of clandestine Masses on her property. During her trial in Tyburn in March 1586, she refused to answer any of the charges for fear of incriminating her servants and children; both her sons became priests, and her daughter became a nun. She was pressed to death on Good Friday, March 25, 1586 at York, England. She is one of the Forty English Martyrs.

Spiritual reading: Joy is not in things; it is in us. (Richard Wagner)

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