CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on January 21, 2014

20110903-115020Gospel reading of the day:

Mark 2:23-28

As Jesus was passing through a field of grain on the sabbath, his disciples began to make a path while picking the heads of grain. At this the Pharisees said to him, “Look, why are they doing what is unlawful on the sabbath?” He said to them, “Have you never read what David did when he was in need and he and his companions were hungry? How he went into the house of God when Abiathar was high priest and ate the bread of offering that only the priests could lawfully eat, and shared it with his companions?” Then he said to them, “The sabbath was made for man, not man for the sabbath. That is why the Son of Man is lord even of the sabbath.”

Reflection on the gospel: Laws and regulation are comfortable; they allow us to conform to certain standards of behavior. We go so far, and we know we’re safe, but if we go a distance greater than the defined one, we know we’re at risk. Jesus tells us in Matthew’s gospel that he did not come to abolish the law but to fulfill it. The freedom of Christians is not life lived within the lines but life lived in the Spirit. Sometimes, life in the Spirit may look like life inside the lines, but since Jesus did not come to abolish the law but to fulfill it, we are invited to live outside the rules when the rules don’t make sense in given circumstances.

Saint of the day: Mother M. Angeline Teresa (Bridget Teresa McCrory) was born on January 21, 1893 in Mountjoy, County Tyrone, Ireland. When she was seven years of age her family migrated to Scotland and at the age of nineteen she left home to become a Little Sister of the Poor, a Congregation engaged in the care of the destitute aged. She made her Novitiate in La Tour, France and after Profession she was sent to the United States.

Mother Angeline Teresa 2_72In 1926, Mother Angeline was appointed Superior of a Home of the Little Sisters of the Poor in the Bronx, New York. During an annual retreat in 1927, she felt an urge to reach out to do more for the aged for whom she cared. She felt that the European way and many of the customs in France did not meet the needs or customs of America. She also felt that old age strikes all classes of people, leaving them alone and frightened. Being unable to effect any necessary changes in her present situation, Mother Angeline sought advice and counsel from Patrick Cardinal Hayes of New York. Not only did he encourage her, but he likewise felt more could be done for the aged people in the New York area. Eventually, this need was recognized in the United States. In order to accomplish what she felt called to do, and with the blessing of the Cardinal, Mother Angeline and six other Sisters withdrew from the Congregation of the Little Sisters of the Poor and were granted permission from Rome to begin a new Community for the care of the aged incorporating Mother Angeline’s ideals. On September 3, 1929, the Carmelite Sisters for the Aged and Infirm was founded.

Thus, though the inspiration Mother received from the Congregation dedicated to the aged poor, she was now able to further develop this needed apostolate with new methods. From the very start, the Carmelite Friars in New York took a deep interest in Mother and her companions. In 1931 the new Community became affiliated with the great Order of Carmel and became known as “Carmelite Sisters for the Aged and Infirm.” Mother Angeline Teresa died in Germantown, New York on her 91st birthday, January 21, 1984. She had the great consolation of seeing the Congregation beyond her expectations. She is buried in the Congregation’s cemetery at St. Teresa’s Motherhouse in Germantown, NY. She was declared venerable in 2012.

Spiritual reading: Assured of your salvation by the unique grace of our Lord Jesus Christ” is the heartbeat of the gospel, joyful liberation from fear of the Final Outcome, a summons to self-acceptance, and freedom for a life of compassion toward others. (Brennan Manning)

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