CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on January 9, 2014

1521683_10151812520261496_1778143446_nGospel reading of the day:

Luke 4:14-22

Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news of him spread throughout the whole region. He taught in their synagogues and was praised by all.

He came to Nazareth, where he had grown up, and went according to his custom into the synagogue on the sabbath day. He stood up to read and was handed a scroll of the prophet Isaiah. He unrolled the scroll and found the passage where it was written:

The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,
because he has anointed me
to bring glad tidings to the poor.
He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives
and recovery of sight to the blind,
to let the oppressed go free,
and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.

Rolling up the scroll, he handed it back to the attendant and sat down, and the eyes of all in the synagogue looked intently at him. He said to them, “Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” And all spoke highly of him and were amazed at the gracious words that came from his mouth.

Reflection on the gospel reading: At one level, the passage that Jesus reads is his mission statement for what he seeks to accomplish in his ministry. Luke presents this scene at the start of Jesus’ ministry, and it introduces the reader to the themes that pervade the remainder of Luke’s gospel. But it is not simply a statement about who Jesus is and who Jesus is becoming during his time on earth; it is also a statement about who Jesus calls us to become: people inspired by the empowering, liberating, eye-opening mission of Jesus for society and the world. When Jesus unrolls the scrolls to read this passage from Isaiah to his fellow Nazarenes, he likewise challenges them, you, and me to become alive, compassionate, merciful, honest, just, and authentic.

Saint of the day: Tommaso Reggio was born in Genoa, Italy on January 9, 1918, to the Marquis of Reggio and Angela Pareto. At the age of 20 he decided to become a priest and was ordained on September 18, 1841. At this time he said, “I want to become a saint, cost what it may, living my life in accordance with the two cornerstones of Christianity: prayer and asceticism.” Tommaso ReggioHe helped found The Catholic Standard, a Catholic newspaper, which he later closed in 1874.

Fr. Reggio was named Bishop of Ventimiglia in 1877. The diocese was so poor, he had to travel on a mule. He founded the Sisters of Saint Martha in 1878, a congregation devoted to caring for the poor. In 1877 he was also named titular bishop of Tanes. Following an earthquake in 1887, he worked with the victims, and ordered his priests to use all resources to help the displaced. He founded orphanages at Ventimiglia and Sanremo for those children who had lost their families in the quake. In 1892 he asked Pope Leo XIII to relieve him of his duties, however the Pope appointed him archbishop of Genoa. He served in this capacity until his death on the afternoon on November 22, 1901. He was beatified in September 2000.

Spiritual reading: And Grace calls out, “You are not just a disillusioned old man who may die soon, a middle-aged woman stuck in a job and desperately wanting to get out, a young person feeling the fire in the belly begin to grow cold. You may be insecure, inadequate, mistaken or potbellied. Death, panic, depression, and disillusionment may be near you. But you are not just that. You are accepted.’ Never confuse your perception of yourself with the mystery that you really are accepted.” (Brennan Manning)

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: