CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on October 26, 2013

1589956249fdad6331f0d044f600bd9e_w600Gospel reading of the day:

Luke 13:1-9

Some people told Jesus about the Galileans whose blood Pilate had mingled with the blood of their sacrifices. He said to them in reply, “Do you think that because these Galileans suffered in this way they were greater sinners than all other Galileans? By no means! But I tell you, if you do not repent, you will all perish as they did! Or those eighteen people who were killed when the tower at Siloam fell on them—do you think they were more guilty than everyone else who lived in Jerusalem? By no means! But I tell you, if you do not repent, you will all perish as they did!”

And he told them this parable: “There once was a person who had a fig tree planted in his orchard, and when he came in search of fruit on it but found none, he said to the gardener, ‘For three years now I have come in search of fruit on this fig tree but have found none. So cut it down. Why should it exhaust the soil?’ He said to him in reply, ‘Sir, leave it for this year also, and I shall cultivate the ground around it and fertilize it; it may bear fruit in the future. If not you can cut it down.’”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Jesus speaks with a group of people who tell him about a couple of calamities that have befallen people. Jesus volunteers that sudden death came to people who neither deserved to die nor in any way contributed to their untimely deaths, but he holds it out as a warning that we should always live our lives in the way we would want to live our last minutes. In the parable at the end of this passage, Jesus points out that the three years of his ministry have not caused his listeners, who are like the fig tree in the parable, to bear fruit. But as long as there is life, Jesus says, there is hope.

Saint of the day: Celine Chludzińska was born on October 29, 1833 in Antowil, Orsza, formerly Poland and now Belarus, one of the three children of wealthy land-owning parents, Ignatius and Petronella Chludzińska. Growing up, she considered a religious vocation, but out of obedience to her parents she married Joseph (Józef) Borzęcki in 1853 becoming Celine Borzęcka. Celina_Chludzińska-BorzęckaDuring their marriage, Celine gave birth to four children, two of whom died in infancy. She helped her husband manage their estate and educated her two daughters, Celine and Hedwig (Jadwiga), at home. In 1869 her husband Joseph had a stroke and was struck by paralysis. Seeking out the best medical treatment for her husband, Celine and her family moved to Vienna. Joseph died a few years later, after which Celine went with her two daughters, Celine and Hedwig, to Rome.

In Rome, she met Fr. Peter Semenenko, a co-founder of the Congregation of the Resurrection, who became her spiritual director. In 1882, Celine Borzęcka along with her daughter Hedwig (her daughter Celine had married) and two other women began living as a religious community. In 1887, Celine Borzęcka opened her first school. On January 6, 1891, the Congregation of the Sisters of the Resurrection was officially founded, and the two co-foundresses, Mother Celine Borzęcka and her daughter Mother Hedwig Borzęcka, made their final vows. In the fall of 1891, the congregation’s first house was opened near Wadowice in Poland. Other houses soon followed in Bulgaria, Poland, and the United States. Mother Celine Borzęcka continued to lead the institute until 1911. She died in Krakow, Poland on October 26, 1913. She was beatified on October 27, 2007.

Spiritual reading: The gospel is absurd and the life of Jesus is meaningless unless we believe that He lived, died, and rose again with but one purpose in mind: to make brand-new creation. Not to make people with better morals but to create a community of prophets and professional lovers, men and women who would surrender to the mystery of the fire of the Spirit that burns within, who would live in ever greater fidelity to the omnipresent Word of God, who would enter into the center of it all, the very heart and mystery of Christ, into the center of the flame that consumes, purifies, and sets everything aglow with peace, joy, boldness, and extravagant, furious love. This, my friend, is what it really means to be a Christian. (Brennan Manning)

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