CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on October 1, 2013

02493_savior_aiden_hart_detGospel reading of the day:

Luke 9:51-56

When the days for Jesus to be taken up were fulfilled, he resolutely determined to journey to Jerusalem, and he sent messengers ahead of him. On the way they entered a Samaritan village to prepare for his reception there, but they would not welcome him because the destination of his journey was Jerusalem. When the disciples James and John saw this they asked, “Lord, do you want us to call down fire from heaven to consume them?” Jesus turned and rebuked them, and they journeyed to another village.

Reflection on the gospel reading: Matthew, Mark, and John seem to suggest that Jesus came and went from Jerusalem a number of time during his ministry. Luke however takes literary license and has Jesus travel to Jerusalem but one time. He apparently does not do this as an accurate history but rather as a metaphorical device. For Luke, Jerusalem typifies the messianic expectations around Jesus, specifically, his passion, death, and resurrection. For this reason, Jerusalem functions as the source of blessing for Israel and all peoples. When Luke records that Jesus resolutely journeys to Jerusalem, Jesus is making a choice about his identity as a person and his trust in his Father.

Saint of the day: St. Theresa of the Child Jesus, often called the Little Flower, was born in Normandy, France, in 1873. She was the youngest of the five daughters born to Louis and Zelie Martin. Theresa was a very lively, lovable little girl. Her father called her his “little queen.” Yet she could be too sensitive and irritable. In the story she wrote of her life, she tells how the Infant Jesus helped her overcome this weakness.

It was Theresa’s great desire to enter the Carmelite convent where two of her sisters were already nuns. But since she was only fifteen, she did not receive permission. Theresa felt sure that Jesus wanted her to spend her life loving him alone. She kept praying and asking the superior to admit her. She even dared to ask the Bishop of Rome himself to grant her heart’s desire. Finally, she was allowed to enter.

Although she was only fifteen, Theresa did not expect to be babied. “Obedience, prayer and sacrifice” were her program. She had a thirst to suffer for love of God. Theresa had the spiritual courage of a real heroine. “May Jesus make me a martyr of the heart or of the body–or better, both!” she wrote. And she meant it. In winter she suffered from the bitter cold and dampness of her plain bedroom. There were other kinds of sufferings, too. Whenever she was humiliated, she would offer her pain to her beloved Jesus. She would hide her hurts under a smile. She told Jesus to do with her whatever was his will.

Sister Theresa tried hard to be humble. She called her great confidence in God her “little way” to holiness. She always had a burning desire to become a saint. The young nun wanted to find a “short cut,” an “elevator,” to take her quickly to sanctity. So she looked in the Bible, and found the words, “Whoever is a little one, come to me.” The Little Flower died on September 30,1897.

Spiritual reading: I have never given the good God anything but love, and it is with love that he will repay. After my death, I will let fall a shower of roses. I will spend my heaven doing good on earth. (Death bed utterance of Teresa of Liseux)

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