CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on June 21, 2013

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 6:19-23

Jesus said to his disciples: “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and decay destroy, and thieves break in and steal. But store up treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor decay destroys, nor thieves break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there also will your heart be.

“The lamp of the body is the eye. If your eye is sound, your whole body will be filled with light; but if your eye is bad, your whole body will be in darkness. And if the light in you is darkness, how great will the darkness be.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Jesus today invites us to take a long loving look at the real. He calls us to reflect on how we see life and whether our perspectives match the deep down things which are the really true. Jesus in this passage is telling us that our core perspectives about reality will guide the ways we live our lives.

The world believes money can solve any problem, even though the evidence is plain that it cannot–it believed it in Jesus’ time, and it believes it now, despite evidence then and now it simply isn’t true. In the first part of the passage, Jesus asks us to let something other than worldly security shape our inner landscape.

In the second part of the passage, Jesus is saying that what we value will determine how we see things. Our principles, values, and beliefs are the lens through which we see the world. We then find the evidence and examples to prove our point of view. People who cannot see beyond money, status, power, or fame truly exist in darkness, because this vision creates the way they relate to other human beings and material things. It is about looking good at all costs and creating an illusion that they have power over people and events.

The poet Mary Oliver asks a question which is relevant to today’s gospel passage. That question is, “Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” Are we going to spend it trying to look like we have it together, creating the illusion that we’re in control? Or are we going to be like Jesus, who lived on the margins, lived for others, tore down idols, and risked being misunderstood, rejected, and broken to reveal the truth about who he really is–and who you and I really are.

Saint of the day: Born in 1568 in Italy, Aloysius Gonzaga was an Italian noble who grew up in a castle; he was the son of a compulsive gambler and cousin of Blessed Rudolph Acquaviva, a Jesuit martyr who died in India. He trained from age four as a soldier and courtier. He suffered from kidney disease which he considered a blessing as it left him bed-ridden with time for prayer. While still a boy himself, he taught catechism to poor boys. He received First Communion from Saint Charles Borromeo who was his teacher, confessor, and parish priest. At age 18, he signed away his legal claim to his family’s lands and title to his brother and became a Jesuit novice. He was a spiritual student of Saint Robert Bellarmine who was Aloysius’ confessor and who worked for his canonization after he had died. Aloysius tended plague victims in Rome in the outbreak of 1591. He died June 20-21, 1591 at Rome of plague and fever. He is buried under the altar of Saint Ignatius Church, Rome.

Spiritual reading: Have that tender care that expresses itself in the little things that are like a balm for the heart….With our neighbors go into the smallest details, whether it is a question of health, of consolation, of prayerfulness, or of need. Console and ease the pain of others through the tiniest of attentions. Be as tender and attentive towards those whom God puts on our path, as a brother towards brother or as a mother for her child. As much as possible be an element of consolation for those around us, as soothing balm. (Charles de Foucauld)

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