CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on June 20, 2013

0594dacb70efff9ecbb9247c8fb4530c_w600Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 6:7-15

“In praying, do not babble like the pagans, who think that they will be heard because of their many words. Do not be like them. Your Father knows what you need before you ask him.

“This is how you are to pray:

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name,
thy Kingdom come,
thy will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread;
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us;
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

“If you forgive men their transgressions, your heavenly Father will forgive you. But if you do not forgive men, neither will your Father forgive your transgressions.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: The Lord’s Prayer is one that most of us know by heart, one that we know so well that we recite the words without thought for what we’re asking. I have a friend who has a resentment against someone who did him a great injury. My friend prays the Lord’s Prayer, but when he does, he does not pray the words, “Forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive those who trespass against us.” My friend recognizes the Lord’s prayer is dangerous: he doesn’t want to make his forgiveness contingent on his ability to forgive. Eventually, though, my friend will need to forgive the wrong he suffered if he is to make his prayer to the Father whole, and those of us who mindlessly pray the Lord’s prayer though we think someone ill for the harm we have sustained will need to forgive if we are to make our prayer true.

Saint of the day: John IJsbrands Galama was born February 24, 1885 on farm in the Netherlands. The seventh and youngest child of Ysbrand Gaeles Galama and Aaltsje Taekes van der Wey, his mother died six months after his birth, and his father died when Galama was a year old. John went to minor seminary in 1899 and then to major seminary in 1905. John Galama was ordained Galama,_Johannes_IJsbrandsa priest in 1910. After his ordination, he had several assignments as an associate pastor.

In 1932, he was assigned to serve as pastor of St. Pancras’s in Heerenberg. In the Second World War Galama was still the pastor of this parish. Neither he nor his two associates were favorable to Nazism. On August 3, 1941, he read a letter from the Dutch bishops during mass that was critical of the NSB, which was the Nazi Party in the Netherlands. The letter derided the principles of the NSB as contrary to Catholic views. Typically, such a letter would have been published in Catholic papers, but the bishops feared the censors and had the letter mimeographed to be disseminated to the parishes and read from the pulpits of the Netherlands’ Catholic churches. Father Galama said he would refuse the sacraments to members of the NSB.

Fr. Galama was promptly betrayed; the Gestapo arrested him for anti-German propaganda and jailed him. Later that year, Fr. Galama transferred to Dachau concentration camp where he, like many other prisoners, was treated very badly. He died as the result of many beatings and exhaustion on June 20, 1942.

Spiritual reading: Discovering vocation does not mean scrambling toward some prize just beyond my reach but accepting the treasure of true self I already possess. Vocation does not come from a voice out there calling me to be something I am not. It comes from a voice in here calling me to be the person I was born to be, to fulfill the original selfhood given me at birth by God. (Thomas Merton)

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