CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on May 28, 2013

162c6616c3a379060cbc3db2389998f7_w600Gospel reading of the day:

Mark 10:28-31

Peter began to say to Jesus, “We have given up everything and followed you.” Jesus said, “Amen, I say to you, there is no one who has given up house or brothers or sisters or mother or father or children or lands for my sake and for the sake of the Gospel who will not receive a hundred times more now in this present age: houses and brothers and sisters and mothers and children and lands, with persecutions, and eternal life in the age to come. But many that are first will be last, and the last will be first.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Among the founders of the religions of the world, Jesus uniquely asked that his disciples love and follow him. Jesus is at once the founder and focus of Christianity. From the very beginning of the faith, Jesus has been the central goal of his followers, and it was Jesus’ intention that he be this. This is apparent in today’s gospel. In this passage, Peter observes that he and his companions have made a radical commitment to follow Jesus, that they have left everything to be with Jesus. And Peter’s comment elicits from Jesus an important response, that Jesus should be at the center of the lives of his disciples. So it is at Jesus’ instruction to us, with love for him and confidence in his teaching, that we proclaim that to the glory of God the Father, Jesus Christ is Lord.

Saint of the day: Piotr Gołąb (Peter Dove) came from a large family in Upper Silesia in Poland. Born in 1888, he received his first communion in May 1898 years. At 16, he began attending school in Nysa and then continued his education at the at St. Gabriel in Vienna. There on September 7, 1911, he began his novitiate in the Society of the Divine Word, and on October 1, 1915, he received priestly ordination.

Piotr GołąbDuring World War I, he was drafted into the army as a chaplain in Torun military hospital. From 1919 he studied Polish literature at the Adam Mickiewicz University, and after graduating he joined the Mission House, Queen of Apostles in Rybnik where he served as a prefect. From 1924, he held a number of positions as director, teacher, editor, and master of novices.

After the outbreak of World War II, on October 28 ,1939 German arrested all the ministers present in the House of St. Joseph and established a temporary camp there. The extermination of the clergy started on November 18, 1939; 20 priests and seminarians were shot in a nearby forest.

Peter Dove was taken on February 5, 1940 to a German transitional camp Zivilgefangenenlager Neufahrwasser and on February 9 to the concentration camp Stutthof. After two months, he was moved to the concentration camp in Sachsenhausen. Exhausted, tortured, and ill, he was was transferred on December 14, 1940 to Dachau with the tattooed registration number 22601. There, he was beaten and died from exhaustion on May 28, 1943; his body was cremated. At death, he weighed 82 pounds. He is among a group of Polish martyrs whose cause for beatification is being investigated by the Church.

Spiritual reading: Contemplation is a very dangerous activity. It not only brings us face to face with God. It brings us, as well, face to face with the world, face to face with the self. And then, of course, something must be done. Nothing stays the same once we have found the God within . . . . We carry the world in our hearts: the oppression of all peoples, the suffering of our friends, the burdens of our enemies, the raping of the Earth, the hunger of the starving, the joy of every laughing child. (Joan Chittister)

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