CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on April 28, 2013

Gospel reading of the day:

John 13:31-33a, 34-35

When Judas had left them, Jesus said, “Now is the Son of Man glorified, and God is glorified in him. If God is glorified in him, God will also glorify him in himself, and God will glorify him at once. My children, I will be with you only a little while longer. I give you a new commandment: love one another. As I have loved you, so you also should love one another. This is how all will head-of-christ-1650.jpg!Blogknow that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: St. John of the Cross once wrote that in the evening of our lives, we will be judged on love alone. I think most of us when we think about perfection are tempted to a little pharisaic hair-splitting–if we can only fulfill the letter of the law perfectly, we shall be perfect. But this isn’t what Jesus asks us to do. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus, when he tells us to be perfect as the heavenly Father is perfect, he quite plainly explains what he means by perfection. We are to love wantonly. We are to love profligately. We are to love dangerously. We are to love with complete abandon. There are no litmus tests. There are no means tests. There are no standards of worthiness we are to use. If you love those who love you, what recompense will you have? Do not the tax collectors do the same? And if you greet your brothers only, what is unusual about that? Do not the pagans do the same? In Christian life, what makes us perfect is not that we adhere well to a set of rules; it is that we love well and consistently. St. John of the Cross also counseled that where there is no love, put love, and you will find love. It isn’t worthiness that earns the right to be loved; it loving which makes both the giver and the receiver of love worthy–even perfect.

Spiritual reading: The meaning of life is found in the giving and receiving of love. (John Paul II)

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