CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on April 26, 2013

christ-in-silence.jpg!BlogGospel reading of the day:

John 14:1-6

Jesus said to his disciples: “Do not let your hearts be troubled. You have faith in God; have faith also in me. In my Father’s house there are many dwelling places. If there were not, would I have told you that I am going to prepare a place for you? And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come back again and take you to myself, so that where I am you also may be. Where I am going you know the way.” Thomas said to him, “Master, we do not know where you are going; how can we know the way?” Jesus said to him, “I am the way and the truth and the life. No one comes to the Father except through me.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: In today’s gospel reading, Jesus asks us not to let our hearts be troubled. This theme, that we not be afraid, arises over and over throughout the pages of scripture. It is an interesting theme given now what we know about the neurological origins of fear and their very useful functions in our lives. Fear serves a very useful function in our lives: it keeps us out of trouble by giving us a proper sense of caution in the face of things that can injure us. It sometimes, however, is inappropriate, since it can impede our full development as human beings. We are not willing to take risks when a given risk might allow us to grow and become better human beings. Moreover, as children of God, we may fail to trust that the Christ already has accomplished the total victory and that all the particularities we encounter are, in fact, simply how God is working out that victory in our lives. So let us not let our hearts be troubled, because all the adversities we face and all the adversities we fear really are not so bad in light of what Jesus already has done to assure the final place of our peace.

Saint of the day: Giovanni Battista Piamarta was born into a poor family in Brescia, Italy on November 26, 1841 and was given a sound Christian upbringing. He entered the seminary in 1860 and was ordained a priest in 1865. Fr. Piamarta focused on young people, work and families, He first worked enthusiastically with youth in rural parishes and later in Brescia. He was distinguished for his zeal and dedication to children, to the sick, and to spiritual direction. The surrounding social scene spurred him to create an institution for workers’ children. Aided by Mons. Pietro Capretti, he founded the Istituto Artigianelli. Its aim was to give boys, especially the destitute, a Christian and professional training with which to face the new industrial society. In spite of many great difficulties, he organized workshops for the different skills and built housing for 100 children. He was like a father to his boys and gave them a deeply religious upbringing. To alleviate the extreme poverty of the peasants who were emigrating to distant America, he founded, with Fr. Bonsignori, an agricultural colony in Remedello to teach and experiment with new farming techniques, which notably increased the productivity of the soil and attracted farmers from Italy and abroad. To ensure the continuity of this work, he founded the Congregation of the Holy Family of Nazareth in 1902. With his mother, he also paved the way for the foundation of a female congregation, the Humble Servants of the Lord. Fr. Piamarta relied on continuous prayer and total trust in divine Providence and always gave priority to the spiritual and material well-being of others. He died in Fr. Bonsignori’s arms in Remedello on April 25, 1913, surrounded by his brothers. He can be considered a father for the young, an example for priests and religious, a model for teachers, an interceder for families and the defender of workers. Along with Kateri Tekakwitha, Marianne Cope, and several others, Fr. Piamarta will be canonized in October 2012.

Spiritual reading: Unless we believe and see Jesus in the appearance of bread on the altar, we will not be able to see him in the distressing disguise of the poor. (Mother Teresa)

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