CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on June 23, 2012

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 6:24-34

Jesus said to his disciples: “No one can serve two masters. He will either hate one and love the other, or be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon.

“Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink, or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food and the body more than clothing? Look at the birds in the sky; they do not sow or reap, they gather nothing into barns, yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are not you more important than they? Can any of you by worrying add a single moment to your life-span? Why are you anxious about clothes? Learn from the way the wild flowers grow. They do not work or spin. But I tell you that not even Solomon in all his splendor was clothed like one of them. If God so clothes the grass of the field, which grows today and is thrown into the oven tomorrow, will he not much more provide for you, O you of little faith? So do not worry and say, ‘What are we to eat?’ or ‘What are we to drink?’ or ‘What are we to wear?’ All these things the pagans seek. Your heavenly Father knows that you need them all. But seek first the Kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given you besides. Do not worry about tomorrow; tomorrow will take care of itself. Sufficient for a day is its own evil.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Jesus speaks today about trust. A persistent temptation in the world has been to trust in money, power, and prestige. Today’s gospel is evidence that it was a phenomenon in Jesus’ time as much as it is one in our time.

We are funny creatures with odd priorities. We spend years worrying about how to acquire money, power, and prestige, often ignoring our health, spirituality, and relationships, and then when we wind up wrecked in some way, through sickness, despair, or isolation. We turn then to the money, power, and prestige we’ve acquired to fix the problems we created by ignoring our health, spirituality, and relationships in the first place. This is the practical effect of Jesus’ warning it is impossible to serve God and mammon.

Then there is the problem of living in the moment, a spiritual axiom which attends all the great spiritual traditions. All traditions agree that the secret to holiness is attention to the present moment: paying attention to what God has placed in front of us right here, right now. If we live our lives with our minds forever on some future moment, we perpetually ignore the present one. And when the future we have attended to arrives, it doesn’t matter, because we’re not present to it. Our minds at that moment are on the horizon. So we reach the end of our lives without ever really having lived.

Jesus calls us to trust God’s providence. God is right here. God is present to you in this moment. God does not forget you. God is often (but not always) slow, but God never fails. The gospel passage we read today asks us to dare to trust that God really is real and really does take care of us from moment to moment, if only we will have the eyes to see. So do not worry about tomorrow; tomorrow will take care of itself.

Saint of the day: Joseph Cafasso was born in 1811 at Castelnuovo d’Asti in the Piedmont, Italy, of peasant parents. He studied at the seminary at Turin, and was ordained in 1833. He continued his theological studies at the seminary and university at Turin and then at the Institute of St. Franics, and despite a deformed spine, became a brilliant lecturer in moral theology there. He was a popular teacher, actively opposed Jansenism, and fought state intrusion into Church affairs. He succeeded Luigi Guala as rector of the Institute in 1848 and made a deep impression on his young priest students with his holiness and insistence on discipline and high standards. He was a sought-after confessor and spiritual adviser, and ministered to prisoners, working to improve their terrible conditions. He met Don Bosco in 1827 and the two became close friends. It was through Joseph’s encouragement that Bosco decided his vocation was working with boys. Joseph was his adviser, worked closely with him in his foundations, and convinced others to fund and found religious institutes and charitable organizations. Joseph died on June 23, 1860 at Turin and was canonized in 1947.

Spiritual reading: My Lord told me a joke. And seeing Him laugh has done more for me than any scripture I will ever read. (Meister Eckhart)

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