CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on May 30, 2012

Gospel reading of the day:

Mark 10:32-45

The disciples were on the way, going up to Jerusalem, and Jesus went ahead of them. They were amazed, and those who followed were afraid. Taking the Twelve aside again, he began to tell them what was going to happen to him.

“Behold, we are going up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man will be handed over to the chief priests and the scribes, and they will condemn him to death and hand him over to the Gentiles who will mock him, spit upon him, scourge him, and put him to death, but after three days he will rise.”

Then James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to Jesus and said to him, “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.” He replied, “What do you wish me to do for you?” They answered him, “Grant that in your glory we may sit one at your right and the other at your left.” Jesus said to them, “You do not know what you are asking. Can you drink the chalice that I drink or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?” They said to him, “We can.” Jesus said to them, “The chalice that I drink, you will drink, and with the baptism with which I am baptized, you will be baptized; but to sit at my right or at my left is not mine to give but is for those for whom it has been prepared.”

When the ten heard this, they became indignant at James and John. Jesus summoned them and said to them, “You know that those who are recognized as rulers over the Gentiles lord it over them, and their great ones make their authority over them felt. But it shall not be so among you. Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you will be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you will be the slave of all. For the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: In Mark’s gospel, Jesus three times foretells his suffering and death. Today’s gospel passage relates the third time that Jesus makes this prediction. Over the last couple of days, we have seen the rich young man receive and reject a call to follow the Lord and Jesus’ subsequent teaching about the call to discipleship. Today’s gospel explains what the real price of following Jesus is and describes the nature of Christian discipleship.

The gospel reading suggests that Jesus and his disciples were on the way to Jerusalem. The text indicates that the disciples were very concerned about what Jesus was doing; after all, they knew that the authorities were after Jesus and they suspected this journey could have no good end. Surely, they must have wondered if Jesus appreciated the situation, but the Lord demonstrates to them that he knows exactly what he is doing and tells them precisely what will happen to him when they arrive in Jerusalem.

The sons of thunder, James and John, then come to the Lord and ask that they may sit one at Jesus’ right and one at his left when Jesus inherits his kingdom. This scene makes unambiguous that James and John still do not understand what Jesus is doing and saying; the brothers labor under the spell of a vision of an earthly kingdom. Jesus responds to their request with an explanation that the cost of discipleship is a willingness to pay even the ultimate price to reveal God and God’s way of life.

When the other disciples hear when James and John have asked to have, they naturally become incensed at their behavior. But Jesus explains to them that what they have imagined is greatness is all wrong. In the world that Jesus came to create, greatness is making oneself small, taking the lowest place at the table, washing the feet of others. True discipleship is service to others.

Saint of the day: Joan of Arc is the patroness of soldiers and of France. On January 6, 1412, Joan of Arc was born to pious parents of the French peasant class, at the obscure village of Domremy, near the province of Lorraine. At a very early age, she heard voices: those of St. Michael, St. Catherine and St. Margaret.

At first the messages were personal and general. Then at last came the crowning order. In May, 1428, her voices “of St. Michael, St. Catherine, and St. Margaret” told Joan to go to the King of France and help him reconquer his kingdom. For at that time the English king was after the throne of France, and the Duke of Burgundy, the chief rival of the French king, was siding with him and gobbling up evermore French territory.

After overcoming opposition from churchmen and courtiers, the seventeen year old girl was given a small army with which she raised the siege of Orleans on May 8, 1429. She then enjoyed a series of spectacular military successes, during which the King was able to enter Rheims and be crowned with her at his side.

In May 1430, as she was attempting to relieve Compiegne, she was captured by the Burgundians and sold to the English when Charles and the French did nothing to save her. After months of imprisonment, she was tried at Rouen by a tribunal presided over by the infamous Peter Cauchon, Bishop of Beauvais, who hoped that the English would help him to become archbishop.

Through her unfamiliarity with the technicalities of theology, Joan was trapped into making a few damaging statements. When she refused to retract the assertion that it was the saints of God who had commanded her to do what she had done, she was condemned to death as a heretic, sorceress, and adulteress, and burned at the stake on May 30, 1431. She was nineteen years old. Some thirty years later, she was exonerated of all guilt.

Spiritual reading: If we pray, we will believe; If we believe, we will love. If we love, we will serve. (Mother Teresa)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: