CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on April 21, 2012

Gospel reading of the day:

John 6:16-21

When it was evening, the disciples of Jesus went down to the sea, embarked in a boat, and went across the sea to Capernaum. It had already grown dark, and Jesus had not yet come to them. The sea was stirred up because a strong wind was blowing. When they had rowed about three or four miles, they saw Jesus walking on the sea and coming near the boat, and they began to be afraid. But he said to them, “It is I. Do not be afraid.” They wanted to take him into the boat, but the boat immediately arrived at the shore to which they were heading.

Reflection on the gospel reading: This passage follows immediately after the miracle of the loaves which was yesterday’s gospel passage. In this passage, the apostles have set out by boat for the other shore, and a storm tosses their vessel. Jesus walks on water, and when the apostles see this, naturally, they are afraid. But Jesus tells them, “It is I. Do not be afraid.” The words It is I are no mere indication of, “Hey, it’s only me,” but instead, they reflect what God told Moses in the burning bush, “I AM.” Though we may be tossed about on the storm of life, we can count on God’s presence, and in God’s presence, we are safe and need not be afraid.

Saint of the day: Anselm of Canterbury was born of Italian nobility in 1033 at Aosta, Piedmont, Italy. After a childhood devoted to piety and study, Anselm wanted to enter religious life, but his father prevented it, and Anselm became rather worldly for several years. Upon his mother’s death, Anselm argued with his father, fled to France, and became a Benedictine monk in Normandy. He studied under and succeeded Lanfranc as abbot. Anselm became the Archbishop of Canterbury. A theological writer and great scholar, he a counselor to William the Conqueror. He opposed slavery and obtained English legislation prohibiting the sale of men. He fought King William Rufus’s encroachment on ecclesiastical rights and the independence of the Church, and was exiled. He resolved theological doubts of the Italo-Greek bishops at Council of Bari in 1098. He strongly supported celibate clergy. King Henry I invited him to return to England, but they disputed over investitures, and Anselm was exiled again to return in 1106. He is one of the great philosophers and theologians of the middle ages and Catholic students of philosophy and theology continue to study his arguments to this day. He died April 21, 1109 at Canterbury, England; his body is believed to be in the cathedral church at Canterbury.

Spiritual reading: I have never seen you, my Lord God, or known your face. What shall I do, Highest Lord, what shall this exile do, banished far from you as he is? What should your servant do, desperate as he is for your love yet cast away from your face? He longs to see you, and yet your face is too far away from him. He wants to come to you, and yet your dwelling place is unreachable. He yearns to discover you, and he does not know where you are. He craves to seek you, and does not know how to recognize you. Lord, you are my Lord and my God, and I have never seen you. You have made me and nurtured me, given me every good thing I have ever received, and I still do not know you. I was created for the purpose of seeing you, and I still have not done the thing I was made to do. (Proslogion by Anselm)

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