CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on February 23, 2012

Gospel reading of the day:

Luke 9:22-25

Jesus said to his disciples: “The Son of Man must suffer greatly and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests, and the scribes, and be killed and on the third day be raised.”

Then he said to all, “If anyone wishes to come after me, he must deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me. For whoever wishes to save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will save it. What profit is there for one to gain the whole world yet lose or forfeit himself?”

Reflection on the gospel: The text here is rich in implications: Jesus talks about his rejection and then talks about picking up the cross. Being misunderstood and even rejected does not feel good, but when we risk being misunderstood and even rejected for the sake of the gospel, we embrace the gospel and imitate Christ. The elders, chief priests, and scribes, of course, were the religious authorities of Jesus’ day, but Jesus’ vision of the truth led him to reject their leadership and set out on a path that the Father had revealed to him.

Stale and lifeless teachings are always a temptation, a refuge from the precariousness of following Jesus. Like the elders, chief priest, and scribes, it is easy to domesticate our religious faith: in our middle class circumstances, full of the illusions of safety, it is very simple to sequester Jesus and put him in a nice safe corner of our lives without any touch points with the day to day events of our existence: our economic lives, our political lives, or anything else. But when we embrace the notion that Jesus is Lord, we embrace something that is unpredictable and dangerous. As Dietrich Bonhoeffer noted, “When Christ calls a man, he bids him come and die.” Jesus is dangerous–he is good–but he is certainly not safe. Jesus’ example is that we be bold in our proclamation of the vision that the Father gives us and tenaciously hold to our prophetic mission even as Jesus tenaciously held to his prophetic mission, even should it risk death, yes, death even on a cross.

Saint of the day: Fr. Ludwik Mzyk came from a miner’s family. His father was a foreman. Ludwik, the fifth of nine children, was born in Pland on April 22nd, 1905 into a deeply religious family. Ludwik was an altar boy from his childhood and showed interest in religion and the Church. He discovered his missionary vocation during parish retreats run by a missionary from Nysa. He revealed his desire to his parents but they did not approve of it. His relatives supported him. Together with his eventually convinced parents they secured a place for Ludwik in the minor seminary of the Divine Word Missionaries at the Holy Cross House in Nysa. Ludwik arrived in Nysa in1918. His father died when Ludwik was still in secondary school. In order to help his mother financially Ludwik, together with his brother, worked in a mine during his summer holidays. After he left Nysa, he entered the novitiate and eventually took vows. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1932 and completed a doctorate in theology at the Gregorian University in Rome in 1935. After a brief time in Austria, he returned to Poland where he became novice master of a new novitiate for the Divine Word Missionaries.

When the war began almost all the inhabitants of the house were evacuated to eastern Poland. He himself stayed in the house. He welcomed with joy all those who returned after a couple of weeks. His calm positively influenced the young. The situation at the beginning of the occupation remained almost unchanged. The Nazis rarely visited the house. However, learning about forced displacement of the population and arrests, the superiors thought about sending the novices back home. Unfortunately, there already were problems with changing addresses. Fr. Ludwik tried different ways to safeguard the future of the novices. He got in touch with the SVD in Austria, Germany, and Rome trying to find a place for them. He even proposed to move the novitiate to Bruczków where the novices could work on the farm to earn their living. However, traveling was banned. Gradually it became clear that although educated in Austria and Germany he did not know how to deal with the Germans as occupants. He made one serious mistake in his contacts with the Gestapo. Talking with one of the officers, and being unaware that he was Gestapo, Fr. Mzyk said that he preferred to negotiate with the army than with the Gestapo, because he trusted the former more. That event had a decisive influence on his future. Using that conversation as a pretext, the Gestapo arrested him on January 25th, 1940. Another priest who returned later to Chludowo reported how cruelly Fr. Ludwik was treated during the loading of the truck in Poznan. He said: “Your Master is a true angel.”

All the information about the martyrdom of Fr. Mzyk was taken from the reports of eye-witnesses, prisoners of Fort VII in Poznan’. Frs. Sylwester Marciniak wrote: “I met Fr. Mzyk in the cell No.60 in Fort VII in Poznan’ on February 1st, 1940. There were 28 others in that cell with him, mostly students. They all starved… The guards entered the cell day and night and beat them without any reason. Fr. Mzyk fulfilled all orders scrupulously and warned everybody not to do things that were forbidden… It was evident that he prayed all the time.”

On February 20, 1940, apparently sensing the end might be near, Fr. Mzyk asked a fellow priest for absolution immediately before he suffered a vicious beating. After the beating, Fr. Mzyk was ordered to stop at the gate and shot him in the back of his head. Fr. Ludwik Mzyk was beatified in 1999 as one of the 108 Polish martyrs.

Spiritual reading: When Christ calls a man, he bids him come and die. (Dietrich Bonhoeffer)

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