CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on December 30, 2011

Gospel of the day:

Luke 2:36-40

There was a prophetess, Anna, the daughter of Phanuel, of the tribe of Asher. She was advanced in years, having lived seven years with her husband after her marriage, and then as a widow until she was eighty-four. She never left the temple, but worshiped night and day with fasting and prayer. And coming forward at that very time, she gave thanks to God and spoke about the child to all who were awaiting the redemption of Jerusalem.

When they had fulfilled all the prescriptions of the law of the Lord, they returned to Galilee, to their own town of Nazareth. The child grew and became strong, filled with wisdom; and the favor of God was upon him.

Reflection on the gospel: Anna’s presence in the story about Mary, Joseph, and Jesus’ encounter with Simeon doesn’t add any specific themes to the narrative. After all, Anna does what Simeon does, that is, prophesies about the child. Luke, however, in his gospel makes a point of the role of women in the unfolding of Jesus’ story, and whenever he introduces a man, he introduces a woman as a counterpoint. Anna serves this role in the gospel: to make sure we understand that God works through women just as God works through men.

There also is an interesting conclusion to this narrative: Jesus commences his first hidden life. We see it punctuated when the young Jesus speaks with the elders at the Temple in Jerusalem before he begins his longer hidden life. All we know about his first 12 years is that he grows, becomes strong, is filled with wisdom, and God favors him. It might seem there is no moral in this account for us, but we too live lives that are hidden, and God calls us, like God called Jesus, to grow, become strong, be filled with wisdom, and be favored. The project, when we consider the expanse of our lives, may sound daunting, but surely we can do it just for today.

Saint of the day: Born of royal blood in the 7th century, Egwin entered a Benedictine monastery and was enthusiastically received by royalty, clergy and the people as the bishop of Worcester, England. As a bishop he was known as a protector of orphans and the widowed and a fair judge. Who could argue with that?

His popularity didn’t hold up among members of the clergy, however. They saw him as overly strict, while he felt he was simply trying to correct abuses and impose appropriate disciplines. Bitter resentments arose, and Egwin made his way to Rome to present his case to Pope Constantine. The case against Egwin was examined and annulled.

Upon his return to England, he founded Evesham Abbey, which became one of the great Benedictine houses of medieval England. It was dedicated to Mary, who had reportedly made it known to Egwin just where a church should be built in her honor.

He died at the abbey on December 30, in the year 717. Following his burial many miracles were attributed to him: The blind could see, the deaf could hear, the sick were healed.

Spiritual reading: What does love look like? It has the hands to help others. It has the feet to hasten to the poor and needy. It has eyes to see misery and want. It has the ears to hear the sighs and sorrows of men. That is what love looks like. (St. Augustine)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: