CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on December 28, 2011

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 2:13-18

When the magi had departed, behold, the angel of the Lord appeared to Joseph in a dream and said, “Rise, take the child and his mother, flee to Egypt, and stay there until I tell you. Herod is going to search for the child to destroy him.” Joseph rose and took the child and his mother by night and departed for Egypt. He stayed there until the death of Herod, that what the Lord had said through the prophet might be fulfilled, Out of Egypt I called my son.

When Herod realized that he had been deceived by the magi, he became furious. He ordered the massacre of all the boys in Bethlehem and its vicinity two years old and under, in accordance with the time he had ascertained from the magi. Then was fulfilled what had been said through Jeremiah the prophet: A voice was heard in Ramah, sobbing and loud lamentation; Rachel weeping for her children, and she would not be consoled, since they were no more.

Reflection on the gospel reading: The Church calls the Holy Innocents “martyrs.” “Martyr” in the Greek means witness. We Christians typically use the term “martyr” to refer to someone who prefers death to denying Christ; in other words, martyrdom involves an act of self-conscious integrity that embraces death rather than violate one’s relationship with Jesus. The Holy Innocents weren’t baptized, and they didn’t even know who Jesus is. They were hapless victims of circumstances that made them the wrong kind of people at the wrong place at the wrong time. What kind of martyrs then are the Holy Innocents? They are like so many other children born into war, famine, abuse, and disease. They witness to us like a mirror. They do nothing worthy of punishment, yet they show us by their violation despite their perfect innocence exactly what malevolence we are capable of. In this, they are martyrs, if not by their conscious being then by their very existence. All of these children, Herod’s innocents, children victimized by war, hunger, HIV, and other diseases, call on the consciences of humanity to stop our madness and give ourselves to the Lord of Light.

Saint of the day: Herod “the Great,” king of Judea, was unpopular with his people because of his connections with the Romans and his religious indifference. Hence he was insecure and fearful of any threat to his throne. He was a master politician and a tyrant capable of extreme brutality. He killed his wife, his brother and his sister’s two husbands, to name only a few.

Matthew 2:1-18 tells this story: Herod was “greatly troubled” when astrologers from the east came asking the whereabouts of “the newborn king of the Jews,” whose star they had seen. They were told that the Jewish Scriptures named Bethlehem as the place where the Messiah would be born. Herod cunningly told them to report back to him so that he could also “do him homage.” They found Jesus, offered him their gifts and, warned by an angel, avoided Herod on their way home. Jesus escaped to Egypt.

Herod became furious and “ordered the massacre of all the boys in Bethlehem and its vicinity two years old and under.” The horror of the massacre and the devastation of the mothers and fathers led Matthew to quote Jeremiah: “A voice was heard in Ramah,/sobbing and loud lamentation;/Rachel weeping for her children…” (Matthew 2:18). Rachel was the wife of Jacob/Israel. She is pictured as weeping at the place where the Israelites were herded together by the conquering Assyrians for their march into captivity.

Spiritual reading: What good is it to me if this eternal birth of the divine Son takes place unceasingly but does not take place within myself? And what good is it to me if Mary is full of grace and if I am not full of grace? What good is it to me for the Creator to give birth to the Son if I do not also give birth to him in my time and my culture? This, then, is the fullness of time: When the Son of God is begotten in us. (Meister Eckhart)

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