CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on July 25, 2011

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 20:20-28

The mother of the sons of Zebedee approached Jesus with her sons and did him homage, wishing to ask him for something. He said to her, “What do you wish?” She answered him, “Command that these two sons of mine sit, one at your right and the other at your left, in your Kingdom.” Jesus said in reply, “You do not know what you are asking. Can you drink the chalice that I am going to drink?” They said to him, “We can.” He replied, “My chalice you will indeed drink, but to sit at my right and at my left, this is not mine to give but is for those for whom it has been prepared by my Father.” When the ten heard this, they became indignant at the two brothers. But Jesus summoned them and said, “You know that the rulers of the Gentiles lord it over them, and the great ones make their authority over them felt. But it shall not be so among you. Rather, whoever wishes to be great among you shall be your servant; whoever wishes to be first among you shall be your slave. Just so, the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Our God is a tricky God. God is quite prepared to use the ways we think about things, fulfill our concepts, but entirely explode them so that in the end, the reality of what we receive from God totally fulfills and defies our expectations.

We have a teaching in this gospel passage that exemplifies this observation about God’s behavior. At the time that Jesus lived, messianic expectations ran very high, and the notion that the messiah would be a worldly though righteous king, a king on the model of David, was common. When the mother of James and John comes to Jesus and asks him that her sons may sit at Jesus’ right and left, her model of Jesus’ kingship is the model of one who makes his authority felt. Jesus, however, uses the moment to teach.

The kingship Jesus shows to us is the kingship of one who comes not to be served but to serve, one who offers a cup we otherwise might wish to avoid, one who offers a cross to carry, one who offers his life as a ransom that others might live. And so it should be with us: that if we should wish to be first, we should make ourselves the last and the servants of everyone else.

Saint of the day: Today is the feast of St. James. James the son of Zebedee and his brother John were among the twelve disciples of Our Lord. They, together with Peter, were privileged to witness the Transfiguration, the healing of Peter’s mother-in-law, and the raising of the daughter of Jairus, and to be called aside to watch and pray with Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane on the night before His death.

st_jamesJames and John were apparently from a higher social level than the average fisherman. Their father could afford hired servants, and John (assuming him to be identical with the “beloved disciple”) had connections with the high priest. Jesus nicknamed the two brothers “sons of thunder,” perhaps meaning that they were headstrong, hot-tempered, and impulsive; and so they seem to be in two incidents reported in the Gospels. On one occasion, Jesus and the disciples were refused the hospitality of a Samaritan village, and James and John proposed to call down fire from heaven on the offenders. On another occasion, the one recorded in the gospel we read at the beginning of today’s install of “Carry the Gospel with You,” they asked Jesus for a special place of honor in the Kingdom and were told that the place of honor is the place of suffering.

Finally, about AD 42, shortly before Passover, James was beheaded by order of King Herod Agrippa I, grandson of Herod the Great (who tried to kill the infant Jesus), nephew of Herod Antipas (who killed John the Baptist and examined Jesus on Good Friday), and father of Herod Agrippa II (who heard the defense of Paul before Festus). James was the first of the Twelve to suffer martyrdom, and the only one of the Twelve whose death is recorded in the New Testament.

James is often called James Major (that is, “the greater” or “the elder”) to distinguish him from other New Testament persons called James. Tradition has it that he made a missionary journey to Spain, and that after his death, his body was taken to Spain and buried there, at Compostela (a town the name of which is commonly thought to be derived from the word “apostle,” although a Spanish-speaking listmember reports having heard it derived from, “field of stars,” which in Latin would be campus stellarum). His supposed burial place there was a major site of pilgrimage in the Middle Ages, and the Spaniards fighting to drive their Moorish conquerors out of Spain took “Santiago de Compostela!” as one of their chief war-cries. (The Spanish form of “James” is “Diego” or “Iago”. In most languages, “James” and “Jacob” mean the same thing. Where an English Bible has “James,” a Greek Bible has IAKWBOS.)

NightCrossingSpiritual reading: Divine action is always new and fresh, it never retraces its steps, but always finds new routes. When we are led by this action, we have no idea where we are going, for the paths we tread cannot be discovered from books or by any of our thoughts. But these paths are always opened in front of us and we are impelled along them. Imagine we are in a strange district at night and are crossing fields unmarked by any path, but we have a guide. He asks no advice nor tells us of his plans. So what can we do except trust him? (Abandonment to Divine Providence by Pére Jean-Pierre de Caussade, S.J.)

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