CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on May 24, 2011

Gospel reading of the day:

John 14:27-31a

Jesus said to his disciples: “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you. Not as the world gives do I give it to you. Do not let your hearts be troubled or afraid. You heard me tell you, ‘I am going away and I will come back to you.’ If you loved me, you would rejoice that I am going to the Father; for the Father is greater than I. And now I have told you this before it happens, so that when it happens you may believe. I will no longer speak much with you, for the ruler of the world is coming. He has no power over me, but the world must know that I love the Father and that I do just as the Father has commanded me.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: In the Last Supper discourse we read in today’s gospel, Jesus before his own violent death tells his disciples of the peace that he gives. It is not the kind of peace that we commonly understand, the mere absence of conflict. The peace of which Jesus speaks in today’s gospel is a peace at the center of our being, which even in the face of disaster, even the disaster of a bloody death, resides in the essence of who we are as a gift of God to us. It is a calm and equilibrium at the very core which is based on the faith-filled certainty that God will ultimately keep us safe and that everything, the good and bad alike, accomplishes God’s purposes for the world. It is a certainty at the core that God transforms even the disaster of the cross into the day of resurrection.

Saint of the day: David I was born in 1084, the son of King Malcolm III and Queen Saint Margaret of Scotland. He was sent to the Norman court in England in 1093. In 1113, he married Matilda, the widow of the earl of Northampton, thereby becoming earl himself, and added the title earl of Cumbria when his brother Alexander I became king. He waged a long war against King Stephen for the throne of England on behalf of his niece Matilda but was defeated at Standard in 1138.

As King of Scotland from 1124, he was much more successful, ruling with firmness, justice, and charity. David established Norman law in Scotland, set up the office of chancellor, and began the feudal court. He also learned the spirit of Cistercian monks from Ailred of Rievaulx, who for a time was David’s steward. Scottish monasticism began to flower from the start of David’s reign and countless almshouses, leper-hospitals, and infirmaries were established.

The monasteries founded under David’s patronage were superb architecturally as well as spiritually. The king re-founded Melrose Abbey on the main road from Edinburgh to the south, and it remained one of the richest houses in Scotland. David also founded Jedburgh Abbey in 1138, filling it was monks from Beauvais in France. At Dundrennan in Dumfries and Galloway he founded in 1142 a splendid abbey and staffed it with Cistercians from Rievaulx. The monks were so well managed that they even started their own shipping line and traded from the Solway Firth less than two miles away. He died at Carlisle, Scotland, on May 24, 1153.

Spiritual reading: When the Church listens, it cures, it reconciles, it becomes what it is in the most luminescent of itself: vivid reflex of love. (Brother Roger of Taizé)

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