CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on May 23, 2011

Gospel reading of the day:

John 14:21-26

Jesus said to his disciples: “Whoever has my commandments and observes them is the one who loves me. Whoever loves me will be loved by my Father, and I will love him and reveal myself to him.” Judas, not the Iscariot, said to him, “Master, then what happened that you will reveal yourself to us and not to the world?” Jesus answered and said to him, “Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him. Whoever does not love me does not keep my words; yet the word you hear is not mine but that of the Father who sent me.

“I have told you this while I am with you. The Advocate, the Holy Spirit whom the Father will send in my name he will teach you everything and remind you of all that I told you.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Pentecost this year falls on June 12, 2011, and we begin now our preparations for the coming of the Advocate, the Holy Spirit that the Father sends to us in Jesus’ name. The Holy Spirit still moves among us to reveal truths to us that we heretofore were not prepared to hear. In an age that has technology that looks into the inner workings of the human brain, in an age that has technology that peers out to the origins of the universe in deepest space, in an age that has uncovered and understood evidence about the migrations of early humans out of Africa into the rest of the world, are we prepared to understand what the Holy Spirit is teaching us about the mysteries of our humanity and God’s loving creative continuing presence?

Saint of the day: John Baptist Rossi was born in 1698 at the village of Voltaggio in the diocese of Genoa and was one of the four children of an excellent and highly respected couple. When he was 10, a nobleman and his wife who were spending the summer at Voltaggio obtained permission from his parents to take him back with them to Genoa to be trained in their house. He remained with them three years, winning golden opinions from all, notably from two Capuchin friars who came to his patrons home. They carried such a favorable report of the boy to his uncle who was then minister provincial of the Capuchins that a cousin Lorenzo Rossi, a canon of Santa Maria in Cosmedin, invited him to come to Rome. The offer was accepted and he entered the Roman College at the age of thirteen. Popular with his teachers and with his fellow pupils he had completed the classical course with distinction when the reading of an ascetical book led him to embark on excessive mortifications. The strain on his strength at a time when he was working hard led to a complete breakdown which obliged him to leave the Roman College. He recovered sufficiently to complete his training at the Minerva, but he never was again really robust. Indeed, his subsequent labors were performed under the handicap of almost constant suffering.

On March 8, 1721 at the age of twenty three, he was ordained and his first Mass was celebrated in the Roman College at the altar of St. Aloysius Gonzaga to whom he always had a special devotion.

He helped start a hospice for homeless women near Saint Galla’s hospice in Rome. He served as a canon of Santa Maria, Cosmedin in 1737 where he used his compensation from the position to purchase an organ for the church. Missioner and catechist to the teamsters, farmers, herdsmen, homeless, sick, beggars, prostitutes, and prisoners of the Campagna region, for many years, John was avoided hearing confessions for fear he would have a seizure in the confessional, but the bishop of Civitá Castellana convinced him it was part of his vocation. John relented and soon became a sought after confessor in Rome; once said that the shortest road to heaven was to guide others there by the confessional. Sought after preacher, he was assigned as a catechist to many government and prison officials, including the public hangman. He died on May 23, 1764 at Trinita dei Pellegrini, Italy of multiple strokes.

Spiritual reading: No unity with God is possible except by an exceedingly great love. (The Inner Closet of the Heart by Dimitri of Rostov)

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