CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on January 22, 2011

Gospel reading of the day:

Mark 3:20-21

Jesus came with his disciples into the house. Again the crowd gathered, making it impossible for them even to eat. When his relatives heard of this they set out to seize him, for they said, “He is out of his mind.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: All of us want to be understood. Most particularly, we want to be understood by the members of our families. But sometimes the work that we do is so important that it is worth the risk of not being understood. Pursuing our vision of God’s will for our lives strikes me as something sufficiently critical that we can risk not being understood. Doing what God wants us to do is important enough to risk being considered mad. Jesus was willing to take that risk, and he suffered his family’s sense he had lost his mind, but he never gave up on what he knew the Father called him to do. If we will walk in his steps, God will lead us. Let us ever strive to walk in his steps, following faithfully the pattern he left for us.

Saint of the day: On October 20, 1870 in Hungary, Ladislaus Batthyany-Strattmann was born into an ancient noble Hungarian family, the sixth of ten brothers. His family moved to Austria when he was six years old, and his mother died when he was 12. When of age, he studied agriculture, chemistry, physics, philosophy, literature, music, and medicine at the University of Vienna, graduating with a medical degree in 1900. On November 10, 1898, he married Countess Maria Teresa Coreth, a pious woman, and the couple had thirteen children; the whole family attended Mass and prayed the Rosary every day.

In 1902, Ladislaus opened a private 25-bed hospital in Kittsee, Austria. He worked there as a general practitioner, and later when he had more staff, specialized as a surgeon and eye doctor. During World War I, the flood of injured soldiers required him to expand the hospital to 120 beds.

In 1915, Ladislaus inherited the castle of Körmend, Hungary, and with it the family name Strattman and the title of Prince. In 1920, he moved his family to the castle and turned one wing into a hospital specializing in eye diseases. Ladislaus’ skills led him to become an internationally known specialist in opthamology.

Dr. Ladislaus never turned away a patient because they could not pay, and provided funds to the destitute. He treated all, kept them in hospital as long as necessary, gave away medications, accepted what patients would pay when they would, but never asked a fee from anyone except that they pray an Our Father for him. He prayed over each patient before working on them, knew that his skills were simply God working through his hands, and saw his family fortune as a way to help the poor. He was considered a saint in life by his family, his patients, and fellow healers. He died January 22, 1931 at Vienna, Austria of bladder cancer and was buried in the family tomb in Güssing, Hungary.

Spiritual reading: A truly loyal friend sees nothing in his friend but his heart. (Spiritual Friendship by Aelred of Rielvaux)

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