CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on July 24, 2010

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 13:24-30

Jesus proposed a parable to the crowds. “The Kingdom of heaven may be likened to a man who sowed good seed in his field. While everyone was asleep his enemy came and sowed weeds all through the wheat, and then went off. When the crop grew and bore fruit, the weeds appeared as well. The slaves of the householder came to him and said, ‘Master, did you not sow good seed in your field? Where have the weeds come from?’ He answered, ‘An enemy has done this.’ His slaves said to him, ‘Do you want us to go and pull them up?’ He replied, ‘No, if you pull up the weeds you might uproot the wheat along with them. Let them grow together until harvest; then at harvest time I will say to the harvesters, “First collect the weeds and tie them in bundles for burning; but gather the wheat into my barn.”‘”

Reflection on the gospel reading: In today’s gospel, Jesus tells a story of bad seed being sown among good. The servants in the house of the owner of the field wish to pull up the bad seed, but the master counsels to wait and see which seed produces what. In the same way, many of us perhaps are tempted to throw out from among the community of believers those who do not conform to our vision of the church, but Jesus in the parable counsels us to wait and let God be the judge. None of us can exercise God’s right to say what is worthy of saving and what is not. All of it ultimately belongs to God.

Saint of the day: Born in about 1544 in England, John Boste was educated at Queen’s College, Oxford from 1569 to 1572. He was a Fellow at Queen’s College. The Tower of LondonHe converted to Catholicism in 1576 at Suffolk, England, resigned his position at Oxford, and studied in Reims in 1580. He was ordained on March 4, 1581 and returned to England the following month as a missionary to the northern counties, often disguised as a servant in the livery costume of Lord Montacute. He assisted in his mission by Blessed John Speed and became the object of an intense manhunt.

John Boste was betrayed by Francis Ecclesfield near Durham on July 5, 1593 at the home of one William Claxton, and arrested. He was sent to the Tower of London where he was crippled by being tortured on the rack. Sent to Durham in July 1594, he was tried for the treason of being a priest. One of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales, he died by being hanged, drawn, and quartered on July 24, 1594 at Dryburn near Durham, England.

NightCrossingSpiritual reading: Divine action is always new and fresh, it never retraces its steps, but always finds new routes. When we are led by this action, we have no idea where we are going, for the paths we tread cannot be discovered from books or by any of our thoughts. But these paths are always opened in front of us and we are impelled along them. Imagine we are in a strange district at night and are crossing fields unmarked by any path, but we have a guide. He asks no advice nor tells us of his plans. So what can we do except trust him? (Abandonment to Divine Providence by Pére Jean-Pierre de Caussade, S.J.)

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