CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, politics, religion by Mike on June 23, 2010

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 7:15-20

Jesus said to his disciples: “Beware of false prophets, who come to you in sheep’s clothing, but underneath are ravenous wolves. By their fruits you will know them. Do people pick grapes from thornbushes, or figs from thistles? Just so, every good tree bears good fruit, and a rotten tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot bear bad fruit, nor can a rotten tree bear good fruit. Every tree that does not bear good fruit will be cut down and thrown into the fire. So by their fruits you will know them.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: The gospel warns us against being deceived by people who come promising to tell us the truth but in fact are merely serving their own agenda. When the good news is preached truthfully, it is a gift given freely and without reserve. We shall know it by the goodness it produces. When it is preached for self-serving purposes, it will all too readily become apparent.

Saint of the day: Joseph Cafasso was born in Italy in 1811 into a wealthy peasant family and educated in the seminary of Chieri. The life of Joseph Cafasso, who was ordained a priest in 1833, was written by Saint John Bosco, to whom Joseph served as teacher, adviser, and spiritual director for over twenty years. Three years later after his ordination, Cafasso was appointed professor of moral theology at the ecclesiastical college of Saint Francis in Turin, which housed 60 young priests from different dioceses and of diverse political orientations. Ten years later he was appointed superior of the college, and he remained in that position until his death. He also directed a retreat house at Lanzo, but his special apostolate was to prisoners and convicts, especially those preparing for execution. Like Saint Robert Bellarmine, Father Cafasso was of short stature and called “the little one,” but he made his mark both as a spiritual director and a preacher. He led a very penitential life and was renowned for his devotion to the Blessed Sacrament and as a confessor.

From 1827, he directed John Bosco into an apostolate for boys, helped him to settle in Turin, introduced him to wealthy patrons, and came to be regarded as the second founder of the Salesians. In 1860, when he was ill with pneumonia, he made a will bequeathing his goods to Saints Joseph Cottolengo and John Bosco. He died from that illness. His funeral, at which Bosco preached, was attended by huge crowds

Spiritual reading: If it often seems to us that we have no power over our cold heart, we still are able to do one thing: pay attention to the silent, shy, almost unconscious stirring of the love of God, to the quiet calls for God by our restless heart. The thousand affairs of our life make us tired and morose; even our joys become stale. We sense how even our friends are still distant from us, how even the words of love from our most intimate friends ring to the ear of our soul only as from afar, dimly and coolly. Everything that the world acclaims we feel more and more as empty bustling without true value. The new becomes old, the days pass by, mere knowledge is cold and empty, life goes along, wealth escapes us, popularity is just a whim, senses age, the world is in flux, friends die. And all that is the lot of normal life, is what people don’t quite count as suffering and pain. In addition is all the pain and bitterness that can fill a human being, all the tears, all the necessities of body and soul . . . . (I)f we endure this disappointment without despairing and without deceiving ourselves, then we begin to love God. (The Need and the Blessing of Prayer by Fr. Karl Rahner, S.J.)

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