CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on June 22, 2010

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 7:6, 12-14

Jesus said to his disciples: “Do not give what is holy to dogs, or throw your pearls before swine, lest they trample them underfoot, and turn and tear you to pieces.

“Do to others whatever you would have them do to you. This is the Law and the Prophets.

“Enter through the narrow gate; for the gate is wide and the road broad that leads to destruction, and those who enter through it are many. How narrow the gate and constricted the road that leads to life. And those who find it are few.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Life presents to us a wide array of options. We can do whatever we want to do, whenever we want to do it, that is, we can take that broad road that leads to destruction. Conversely, we have the possibility to enter through the narrow gate that leads to life. And where is this narrow gate? It is in the active pursuit of the good for others that we would desire for ourselves: the Golden Rule that Jesus gives us in today’s gospel, “Do to others whatever you would have them do to you.” It is a narrow gate because it requires of us focus and single-heartedness. Really, it isn’t so hard a thing to do, this living for the good of the other, but it does require us to be consistent and determined. Focus, single-heartedness, consistency, and determination: these are the reasons we may perceive that gate which leads to life as a narrow one.

Saint of the day: Thomas More was born at London in 1478. After a thorough grounding in religion and the classics, he entered Oxford to study law. Upon leaving the university he embarked on a legal career which took him to Parliament. In 1505, he married his beloved Jane Colt who bore him four children, and when she died at a young age, he married a widow, Alice Middleton, to be a mother for his young children. A wit and a reformer, this learned man numbered bishops and scholars among his friends and by 1516 wrote his world-famous book Utopia. He attracted the attention of Henry VIII who appointed him to a succession of high posts and missions, and finally made him Lord Chancellor in 1529. However, he resigned in 1532, at the height of his career and reputation, when Henry persisted in holding his own opinions regarding marriage and the supremacy of the Pope. The rest of his life was spent in writing mostly in defense of the Church.

In 1534, with his close friend, St. John Fisher, whose feast it also is today, he refused to render allegiance to the King as the Head of the Church of England and was confined to the Tower. Fifteen months later, and nine days after St. John Fisher’s execution on June 22, he was tried and convicted of treason. He told the court that he could not go against his conscience and wished his judges that “we may yet hereafter in heaven merrily all meet together to everlasting salvation.” And on the scaffold, he told the crowd of spectators that he was dying as “the King’s good servant-but God’s first.” He was beheaded on July 6, 1535.

Spiritual reading: What men call fame is, after all, but a very windy thing. A man thinks that many are praising him, and talking of him alone, and yet they spend but a very small part of the day thinking of him, being occupied with things of their own. (Thomas More)

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