CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on January 22, 2010

Gospel reading of the day:

Mark 3:13-19

Jesus went up the mountain and summoned those whom he wanted and they came to him. He appointed Twelve, whom he also named Apostles, that they might be with him and he might send them forth to preach and to have authority to drive out demons: He appointed the Twelve: Simon, whom he named Peter; James, son of Zebedee, and John the brother of James, whom he named Boanerges, that is, sons of thunder; Andrew, Philip, Bartholomew, Matthew, Thomas, James the son of Alphaeus; Thaddeus, Simon the Cananean, and Judas Iscariot who betrayed him.

Reflection on the gospel reading: Jesus’ appointment of 12 apostles suggests his conscious awareness of the ties between his ministry and the history of his people. At the time of the the Assyrian invasion of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the eighth century, 10 of the 12 tribes were scattered and lost, and the history of God’s chosen people was disrupted. The proclamation of the Kingdom of God, the central message of Jesus’ ministry, suggested to the Lord the need to symbolically reestablish the 12 tribes of Israel. The naming of the 12, therefore, partly testifies to the continuity of God’s action within the lives of his chosen ones. Through our baptism, God has chosen us. We can trust that just as Jesus’ ministry continued and fulfilled the history of Israel, God will continue to remain present in our lives. The same God who cares for us today will care for us tomorrow, so no matter what troubles lie before us, we can be confident that God either will render them harmless or give us the strength to sustain the trials God sends.

Saint of the day: On October 20, 1870 in Hungary, Ladislaus Batthyany-Strattmann was born into an ancient noble Hungarian family, the sixth of ten brothers. His family moved to Austria when he was six years old, and his mother died when he was 12. When of age, he studied agriculture, chemistry, physics, philosophy, literature, music, and medicine at the University of Vienna, graduating with a medical degree in 1900. On November 10, 1898, he married Countess Maria Teresa Coreth, a pious woman, and the couple had thirteen children; the whole family attended Mass and prayed the Rosary every day.

In 1902, Ladislaus opened a private 25-bed hospital in Kittsee, Austria. He worked there as a general practitioner, and later when he had more staff, specialized as a surgeon and eye doctor. During World War I, the flood of injured soldiers required him to expand the hospital to 120 beds.

In 1915, Ladislaus inherited the castle of Körmend, Hungary, and with it the family name Strattman and the title of Prince. In 1920, he moved his family to the castle and turned one wing into a hospital specializing in eye diseases. Ladislaus’ skills led him to become an internationally known specialist in opthamology.

Dr Ladislaus never turned away a patient because they could not pay, and provided funds to the destitute. He treated all, kept them in hospital as long as necessary, gave away medications, accepted what patients would pay when they would, but never asked a fee from anyone except that they pray an Our Father for him. He prayed over each patient before working on them, knew that his skills were simply God working through his hands, and saw his family fortune as a way to help the poor. He was considered a saint in life by his family, his patients, and fellow healers. He died January 22, 1931 at Vienna, Austria of bladder cancer and was buried in the family tomb in Güssing, Hungary.

Spiritual reading: What is a faithful man to do in the chaos of events which seem to swallow him up? He must sustain himself calmly by Faith. Faith will make him adore the eternal plan of God. Faith will assure him that to those who love God all things work together for good. (William Joseph Chaminade)

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