CACINA

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on June 27, 2009

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 8:5-17

When Jesus entered Capernaum, a centurion approached him and appealed to him, saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, suffering dreadfully.” He said to him, “I will come and cure him.” The centurion said in reply, “Lord, I am not worthy to have you enter under my roof; only say the word and my servant will be healed. For I too am a man subject to authority, with soldiers subject to me. And I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and to another, ‘Come here,’ and he comes; and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” When Jesus heard this, he was amazed and said to those following him, “Amen, I say to you, in no one in Israel have I found such faith. I say to you, many will come from the east and the west, and will recline with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob at the banquet in the Kingdom of heaven, but the children of the Kingdom will be driven out into the outer darkness, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.” And Jesus said to the centurion, “You may go; as you have believed, let it be done for you.” And at that very hour his servant was healed.

Jesus entered the house of Peter, and saw his mother-in-law lying in bed with a fever. He touched her hand, the fever left her, and she rose and waited on him.

When it was evening, they brought him many who were possessed by demons, and he drove out the spirits by a word and cured all the sick, to fulfill what had been said by Isaiah the prophet:

He took away our infirmities and bore our diseases.

Reflection on the gospel reading: In today’s gospel, we have a series of healing stories. Jesus heals the centurion’s servant. Jesus heals Peter’s mother-in-law. Jesus heals all the sick people they bring to him at the end of the day. And in the combination of these stories, we see how freely Jesus heals. In the first case, someone who is not sick pleads for someone who is sick but at a distance. In the second case, Jesus himself goes to a person who is sick. In the third case, people bring to Jesus those who are sick. The stranger pleads with Jesus. Jesus heals the relative of his friend. Jesus heals crowds. Jesus heals without conditions. There are no boundaries: People ask for others; people don’t ask; people ask for themselves. It doesn’t matter: Jesus is lavish, profligate, even wanton in his healing. Jesus is the prodigal healer.

Saint of the day: Born in Neustra, Hungary, July 29, 1040, Ladislaus died at Nitra, Bohemia, July 29, 1095. Ladislaus of the house of Arpad, son of King Bela, was elected king of Hungary in 1077 by the nobles. He followed in the footsteps of Saint Stephen I of Hungary. Immediately he was faced with the claims of a relative and son of a former king, Solomon, to the throne, and defeated him on the battlefield in 1089. He developed the power of his young kingdom. He fought just and successful wars against Poles, Russians, and the Tartars.

Ladislaus married Adelaide, daughter of Duke Welf of Bavaria, one of Rupert’s supporters. While Ladislaus encouraged Christian missionaries and fostered Christianity within his dominions, he allowed religious freedom to the Jews and Islamics within his realm.

He was distinguished personally for the justness of his rule and the virtue of his life. In 1091, Ladislaus marched to the aid of his sister, Helen, Queen of Croatia, against the murderers of her husband. When she died childless, he extended the boundaries of his kingdom by the annexation of Croatia and Dalmatia despite objections from the pope, the emperor in Constantinople, and Venice.

In 1092 at the Synod of Szabolcs, Ladislaus promulgated a series of laws on religious and civil matters. He was chosen to lead the armies of the first crusade but before he could go he died. In a sentence, Laszlo was the ideal national hero. He is venerated for his zeal, piety, and moral life. In 1192, his relics were enshrined as those of a saint in the cathedral he had founded at Nagyvarad.

Spiritual reading: Every part of the journey is of importance to the whole. (The Way of Perfection by Teresa of Avila)

One Response

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  1. Anulee said, on June 28, 2009 at 7:43 pm

    Hi nice website.

    Check this site :http://guide-spirituel.blogspot.com

    Amazing videos of true miracles.


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