CACINA

Homily- Holy Trinity Parish Sunday August 3, 2014

Posted in Called, christian, Christianity, church events, Eucharist, inspirational, religion, scripture, Word by Fr Joe R on August 3, 2014

Homily for the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A 2014

Homily for the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A 2014

We begin today with a reading about the prophet Elijah. Most of us are not all that familiar with Elijah except perhaps that he was an Old Testament prophet who never died but was taken up into heaven, and is thought to be going to return before the end of the world. In the verses before this reading, Elijah is very depressed, and says he can’t go on and he prays to God that he might die. Rather ironic, since he is one of the few Biblical people that never does die. But God takes care of him and when Elijah goes into the wilderness, God sees to it that he finds food and drink, and that he rests.

Once his physical needs have been taken care of, Elijah goes into a cave and God allows Elijah to vent his anger on the Hebrew nation because they have not heeded him and have turned to other gods. He tells God that he feels alone and isolated and depressed.

God realizes that what Elijah needs at this point in his life is a personal encounter with God and so God tells Elijah to leave the cave and stand on Mount Horeb, the place where Moses had been given the Ten Commandments. As Elijah did what the Lord had said, and he waited to hear God, he began to look for God  in dramatic ways – in thunder and lightning, earthquakes and wind and fire. Just as many of us look for God in extraordinary manifestations, so did Elijah. But God did not come to Elijah in any of those ways, but he came in the simplicity of silence, in a whisper instead of a loud roar!

The lesson here for us is not to look for God in the extraordinary, but in the simple. Listen to the silence. It is there that we will hear God when God speaks to us. It is the same peacefulness that the first lines of the psalm repeat today: Let me hear what God the Lord will speak, for he will speak peace to his people.

Elijah was depressed and it took God’s voice to get him out of it. Similarly, Paul is depressed today as well in the reading from Romans, and he, like Elijah is upset because the Hebrew nation as a whole has not accepted Jesus. He is greatly saddened by that fact since the promise belonged to the Jews first. Paul says he has great sorrow and unceasing anguish in his heart over that fact. God does not console Paul in his reading. He is consoled, however, by the fact hat he knows he is telling the truth about Christ, and the Holy Spirit confirms this by giving him a clear conscience in regard to the matter.

In the Gospel today, this theme is carried out with the apostles being the ones, who were not so much depressed, but frightened. Jesus had gone, like Elijah, to the mountain to pray, to communicate with God. The Apostles had gone into a boat and were crossing, without Jesus, to the other side of the lake when a storm erupted. In their fear they saw a figure walking toward them on the water, and their fear turned to terror. They really couldn’t believe that it could be Jesus walking on the water even though Jesus spoke to them and told them not to fear. Peter recognized Jesus and wanted to come to him and so he asked Jesus to command him to come and walk on the water as well. So Peter climbed from the boat and began to walk on the water toward Jesus until he became frightened by the wind and waves, and began to sink. Jesus reached out and caught him but indicated that he sank because he lost faith. And when Peter and Jesus climbed into the boat, the winds stopped and it became peaceful again. Peter had listened to the Lord, and was able to do the impossible – walk on water – but when he was distracted by the winds and the waves, he began to question what was happening and began to sink. This event marked the moment in Matthew when the divinity of Jesus became clear to the Apostles despite other miracles he had performed. It seemed to solidify their belief that this man was truly the Son of God and worthy of worship.

What kinds of lessons can we draw from these readings today? Well, first of all, let’s look for God in the moments we might not expect him – in the silences, in the faces of others, in the stillness. It is in these moments that God talks to us, inspires us, helps us make decisions, leads us. And secondly, let us look to Jesus and not be distracted by other things. If we can keep our minds and hearts focused on Jesus there is nothing that we can’t do. It is when we are distracted and look away, when we lose faith in ourselves and question God in our lives that we are prone to depression and worry. Jesus can come to us on the water, and we can follow him, just like the child who, being thrown into the air, trusts that his father will catch him. That kind of faith and trust will give us the ability to hear God, and to follow him no matter where he leads us, knowing that truth and peace will prevail in our lives.

And this is the Good News of how we communicate with God, and how we need to focus on Jesus in our lives.

Bishop Ron Stephens

Pastor of St. Andrew’s Parish in Warrenton, VA

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[You can purchase a complete Cycle A of Bishop Ron’s homilies, 75 of them, from amazon.com for $9.99 - “Teaching the Church Year”]

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Homily August 3, 2014 18th Sunday of Ordinary

Posted in Called, christian, Christianity, Eucharist, inspirational, religion, scripture by Fr Joe R on July 30, 2014

18 sun1Today’s gospel is interesting in how it presents a picture of Jesus at a low moment. His cousin John the Baptist has been beheaded by Herod. Like any of us hearing bad news, he wants to withdraw and digest the news. He gets in a boat and goes off to a deserted place. But like most of us in our own time, there is no escape. As time and circumstance binds us in time and space, so Jesus is bound to the people anxious to hear him and they even anticipated his destination and some got there first. How fast would we be to put off our grief, our need to be alone, to reach out to others’ needs? Matthew says he saw their needs and started to cure the sick, to walk among them, to be with them. As in his whole life the “I” became “you”. Even when approached to send them away 18 sun2because they had to get food and evening approached, he says no, share what we have. Images of manna in the desert come to mind, but more than that, the passage is a reminder and type of the Eucharist to come at the last supper. From a meager supply, the bread and fish are blessed and broken and shared among all those present. Sharing was not uncommon in that time and world, but the feeding of so many was. Our scriptures today tell us that God looks out for us and calls us to come and eat and drink.

Ironically, if we look at the world today, we see areas of hunger and famine and starvation in various places. How disordered a world we live in that anyone should be hungry. Part of the fallen nature of humanity is the disorder and lack of caring and looking out for others in the name of the love of God. If the world was an ideal place, the food produced could feed everybody to a point of preventing starvation and hunger. Jealousy, nation against nation, just plain evil, points out that sin is still present. Christ’s love and offering for all is there but still many turn from God’s love looking for who knows what that will never put there being at rest. Physical hunger is something that food can satisfy, but that other hunger which is in our spirit, in our psyche is satisfied by a different food, a food over and above just the physical, a food given by Christ: his body and blood. 18 sun 3As Christians, we are very much a Eucharistic community, we hunger and are satisfied only by that food Jesus gives us for our journey of love to eternal life. Throughout history God foreshadowed what we have with the manna in the desert, the loaves and fishes of Jesus, but especially now we have the Eucharist given at the last supper. You might say that we are now a people in the desert of life being fed by Jesus on that journey through the darkness around us into that glorious day we meet our Lord.

Homily Holy Trinity Parish Sunday July 27, 2014

Posted in Called, christian, Christianity, ecclesiology, ethics, inspirational, religion, Resurrection, Word by Fr Joe R on July 27, 2014

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on July 27, 2014

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 13:44-52

Jesus said to his disciples: “The kingdom of heaven is like a treasure buried in a field, which a person finds and hides again, and out of joy goes and sells all that he has and buys that field. Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a merchant searching for fine pearls. When he finds a pearl of great price, he goes and sells all that he has and buys it. 791e95b54fc244055d6c654b12d011d6_w600Again, the kingdom of heaven is like a net thrown into the sea, which collects fish of every kind. When it is full they haul it ashore and sit down to put what is good into buckets. What is bad they throw away. Thus it will be at the end of the age. The angels will go out and separate the wicked from the righteous and throw them into the fiery furnace, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth. “Do you understand all these things?” They answered, “Yes.” And he replied, “Then every scribe who has been instructed in the kingdom of heaven is like the head of a household who brings from his storeroom both the new and the old.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Some who read this blog will know that when I was a young man, I spent a part of my life in the Society of Jesus. The General Superior of the Society in those days was Pedro Arrupe, who has since gone to God. His life was redolent with meaning he found in his love for Jesus, and the Church is now investigating his cause for canonization. The Servant of God Pedro Arrupe once wrote:

Nothing is more practical than finding God, than falling in Love in a quite absolute, final way. What you are in love with, what seizes your imagination, will affect everything. It will decide what will get you out of bed in the morning, what you do with your evenings, how you spend your weekends, what you read, whom you know, what breaks your heart, and what amazes you with joy and gratitude. Fall in Love, stay in love, and it will decide everything.

This is the message of today’s gospel: the person who finds a treasure in the field, the person who searches for a fine pearl, both of them fall madly in love with something, and it affects everything they do. If we let ourselves fall in love with God in a quite absolute and final way, we never will be the same again: God will seize our imaginations and affect everything we do.

Spiritual reading:

Who made the world?
Who made the swan, and the black bear?
Who made the grasshopper?
This grasshopper, I mean-
the one who has flung herself out of the grass,
the one who is eating sugar out of my hand,
who is moving her jaws back and forth instead of up and down-
who is gazing around with her enormous and complicated eyes.
Now she lifts her pale forearms and thoroughly washes her face.
Now she snaps her wings open, and floats away.
I don’t know exactly what a prayer is.
I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down
into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,
how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,
which is what I have been doing all day.
Tell me, what else should I have done?
Doesn’t everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?

(Mary Oliver, “The Summer Day”)

Homily for the 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A 2014

Homily for the 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Year A  2014

The theme of our readings today is very simply – the Lord provides. Both our physical needs and our spiritual needs can be taken care of if we put our trust in God. If this is so, then why do we still need things? The only answer can be that we haven’t fully placed our trust in our Creator. Let’s face it – it is not an easy thing to do. Even St. Thomas who was so close to Jesus was not able to do it without physical proof. And most of us are not saints yet!

Yet, I am always so very surprised that when I let go and give everything over to God, somehow things get better. But most of us have to be overwhelmed before we end up doing that.

In the Gospel today we see a stunning example of faith and trust in Jesus. We all know that a great crowd of people can turn against someone very quickly, and hunger and thirst are two of the base needs that cause revolution and war. The apostles were worried when the evening was coming and none of this crowd of people had been fed. Yes, Jesus had been very charismatic that day, and had compassion for the crowd and worked all sorts of miracles and healings for them. But hunger can turn a crowd.

The Apostles thought the best idea was to send them away to nearby villages so that they could purchase food. I presume that most of the crowd would not have much money, and purchasing food might not be an option for them.

You can imagine their surprise when Jesus said that their idea wasn’t a good one and that the Apostles better feed them instead. Someone today would probably have looked at Jesus as though he were joking, and say “Yeah…right!”

Bur Jesus was not joking and asked them to gather what food there was – which was really very little. And what did Jesus do? he put his trust in God and prayed to God. he then said the traditional blessing before a meal, and started to distribute the food to the Apostles to give out. The result: 5000 ate supper.

I am reminded of a wedding I performed a few weeks ago.  I had left a ciborium at the door and asked people to put a host in if they were going to communion. When the gifts were brought up at the Offertory, the ciborium was empty – they either hadn’t heard or felt embarrassed to get out of their seats.  In any case, I put in about twenty hosts just in case. Well, at communion, suddenly rows and rows of people got up to go to communion. I looked at my poor twenty hosts and all these people – and said to myself: “Jesus, you fed the five thousand – help me here!

Every time someone came up, I cut the remaining hosts smaller and smaller and in the end, about 100 people came to communion and I ran out for the last five. The last five got a nice blessing and an apology.  Guess I am nowhere as good as Jesus yet!

The Psalmist and the prophet Isaiah both re-iterate the theme of trusting in God to provide for us. Isaiah uses the beautiful metaphor of eating and drinking applied to the Word of God. The Word of God will sustain us even more than wine, milk and bread. So if we are needy, we simply have to come to the waters of Scripture and eat the food that is provided there. The Psalmist cries that “You open your hand to feed, us Lord, and satisfy our needs.” The Lord has compassion on us and he loves us.

One last word about these readings today and that is about the question of “need”. Only the Lord knows what we truly need, and as we have said over and over, God’s ways our not ours.  We may think we need certain things, and in our culture, we always seem to be needing something. None of the things that God provides in Scripture are things of excess – they are base needs: hunger, thirst, love. Too often today our ‘needs’ are tied up in things that are excesses or unnecessary to a simple way of life. And that is why perhaps we only think to ask God, and give things over to God when we are very low and needy – because these are the things God is most likely to provide.

Finally, we need also to pray to God as Jesus did, eyes open – perhaps a metaphor to be very clear in what we are asking – and keep knocking on God’s door. Jesus gave us a way. We just need to follow it.

And this is the Good News of God’s providence that we are given today!

Bishop Ron Stephens 

Pastor of St. Andrew’s Parish in Warrenton, VA

The Catholic Apostolic Church in North America (CACINA)

[You can purchase a complete Cycle A of Bishop Ron’s homilies, 75 of them, from amazon.com for $9.99 - “Teaching the Church Year”]

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Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on July 23, 2014

5473e7f897aab994b55fe11ebc82540f_w600Gospel reading:

Matthew 13:1-9

On that day, Jesus went out of the house and sat down by the sea. Such large crowds gathered around him that he got into a boat and sat down, and the whole crowd stood along the shore. And he spoke to them at length in parables, saying: “A sower went out to sow. And as he sowed, some seed fell on the path, and birds came and ate it up. Some fell on rocky ground, where it had little soil. It sprang up at once because the soil was not deep, and when the sun rose it was scorched, and it withered for lack of roots. Some seed fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up and choked it. But some seed fell on rich soil, and produced fruit, a hundred or sixty or thirtyfold. Whoever has ears ought to hear.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: Two thousand years after Jesus’ death and resurrection, we know that the coming of the Kingdom of God is not without setbacks, and Jesus’ Parable of the Sower of the Seed assumes an air not just of parable but of prophecy as well. Jesus said the the Kingdom will not arrive in a smooth and orderly process. There will be fits and starts along the way. Epochs in history will seem like the gospel is being consumed wholesale, and in other times, it will sprout only to whither. But the ultimate trajectory of the Kingdom is secure. When all is said and done, the gospel will produce a rich harvest. We only need to do our part and wait for God to yield the rich harvest.

Saint of the day: The Servant of God Virginia Blanco Tardio was the second of four daughters of Louis Pius White Unzueta and Daria Late Quiroga. She was born in Cochabamba, Bolivia on April 18, 1916 and earned the Bachelor of Humanities at the College of the Handmaids of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. She had a general knowledge far superior to most of her contemporaries and had extensive biblical and theological knowledge. Blanco_VShe received the title of Professor of Religion School when I was 32. From the time when she was young, Virginia was an exemplary catechist teaching children, youth, and adults in Spanish and Quechua to receive the sacraments. She was beloved by her students to whom she taught religion in several public schools in Cochabamba for 40 years; she worked more than 10 of those years without receiving a salary. Virginia was a member of Catholic Action, and for many years, she served as the president of the Diocesan Women’s Association of Catholic Action. During the 1950s, she served the welfare of indigent people, even opening her house to support their needs. In 1962, she founded the Prayer and Friendship Group. She continued her service of the poor throughout her life, dying of a heart attack on the night of July 23, 1990 at age 74. The investigation of her virtues is drawing to a close, and there is a strong likelihood she will be named a venerable in the near future.

Spiritual reading: Finally I am coming to the conclusion that my highest ambition is to be what I already am. That I will never fulfill my obligation to surpass myself unless I first accept myself, and if I accept myself fully in the right way, I will already have surpassed myself. (Thomas Merton)

Homily July 27, 2014 17th Sunday of Ordinary Time

17 sun 1One thing ingrained in all of us is that we want the best that we can have for ourselves. We all work hard and do our best to achieve a comfortable life and the same for our family. The parables today liken the kingdom of heaven to a treasure or an expensive pearl that prompts us to sell all that we have and use that to get the treasure or pearl and a better life. It is not hard to imagine a person so dedicated to a thing or a cause that his life is centered on one thing or goal. We see it around us in our daily life, in some athletes and business people driven by the lure of wealth and advancement and power. But really implanted in all of us is a desire for a goal in life, to make a difference and means to carry it out. As we grow we realize that one choice pretty much shapes future choices. So it is in our spiritual life. The treasure of God’s love might seem ethereal or out there, but it is real and is a call, a goal to seek. Throughout history, we might be surprised and even marvel at the dedication that that love brought about in different individuals. To see people who have dedicated their whole life to serve God by giving of themselves to others is always an inspiring thing. Some can do this and still support and lead a family life, while other choose to serve in a religious life. The point is really the selflessness they show in how they go about getting the treasure or pearl they see.

It is interesting, that Christ never mentions or goes into the ethics of hiding the treasure and 17 sunbuying the land and the ownership of the treasure belonging to the finder or the land owner. His concern was the value of the treasure, the kingdom of heaven. Its magnitude and importance pushed aside other considerations and truly one seeking the treasure of the kingdom would not be one to selfishly keep the news of the kingdom for himself. All who are called learn to embrace others. Their wealth, their treasure, their love becomes present for all. Giving up everything and selling it all to get the treasure, is more than hitting the lottery, rather it is the beginning of a foundation for life. God’s love is a starting point and a compass on a journey that twists and turns and has peaks and valleys along the way. As long as our eye is on that treasure, God’s love will lead us there.

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, Resurrection, scripture by Mike on July 22, 2014

Gospel reading of the day:

John 20:1-2, 11-18

On the first day of the week, Mary Magdalene came to the tomb early in the morning, while it was still dark, and saw the stone removed from the tomb. So she ran and went to Simon Peter and to the other disciple whom Jesus loved, and told them, “They have taken the Lord from the tomb, and we don’t know where they put him.”

40Mary stayed outside the tomb weeping. And as she wept, she bent over into the tomb and saw two angels in white sitting there, one at the head and one at the feet where the Body of Jesus had been. And they said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping?” She said to them, “They have taken my Lord, and I don’t know where they laid him.” When she had said this, she turned around and saw Jesus there, but did not know it was Jesus. Jesus said to her, “Woman, why are you weeping? Whom are you looking for?” She thought it was the gardener and said to him, “Sir, if you carried him away, tell me where you laid him, and I will take him.” Jesus said to her, “Mary!” She turned and said to him in Hebrew, “Rabbouni,” which means Teacher. Jesus said to her, “Stop holding on to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father. But go to my brothers and tell them, ‘I am going to my Father and your Father, to my God and your God.'” Mary Magdalene went and announced to the disciples, “I have seen the Lord,” and then reported what he told her.

Reflection on the gospel reading: The story of Mary Magdalene is a story of faithfulness Though all of Jesus’ male disciples abandoned the Lord while he suffered on the cross, Mary stood by the side of Jesus’ mother to grieve without fear of the authorities. Even after Jesus took his last breath, and all hope of Jesus’ vision seemed lost, Mary stayed by her teacher and friend and prepared his body for burial. Her faithfulness was so great that on the first day of the week, when the Sabbath concluded, it was this woman who promptly went to the tomb at the earliest hour the Law permitted to anoint the Lord’s broken body. She it is who finds the tomb is empty, and she it is who as an apostle to the apostles, runs to announce the empty tomb to Peter Mary Magdaleneand John. Though Peter and John walk away from the tomb after they see it is empty, she does not. She stays. And it is to her, for her love, singleheartedness, and devotion, that the Lord gives the reward of revealing his resurrection.

Saint of the day: Mary of Magdala (her hometown, a village on the shore of the Sea of Galilee) was a leading figure among those attracted to Jesus. When the men in that company abandoned him at the hour of mortal danger, Mary of Magdala was one of the women who stayed with him, even to the Crucifixion. She was present at the tomb, the first person to whom Jesus appeared after his resurrection and the first to preach the “Good News” of that miracle. These are among the few specific assertions made about Mary Magdalene in the Gospels. From other texts of the early Christian era, it seems that her status as an “apostle,” in the years after Jesus’ death, rivaled even that of Peter. This prominence derived from the her close friendship with Jesus. Beginning with the threads of these few statements in the earliest Christian records, dating to the first through third centuries, an elaborate tapestry was woven, leading to a portrait of St. Mary Magdalene in which the most consequential note—that she was a repentant prostitute—is almost certainly untrue.

Spiritual reading:

Love wants to reach out and manhandle us,
Break all our teacup talk of God.

If you had the courage and
Could give the Beloved His choice, some nights,
He would just drag you around the room
By your hair,
Ripping from your grip all those toys in the world
That bring you no joy.

Love sometimes gets tired of speaking sweetly
And wants to rip to shreds
All your erroneous notions of truth

That make you fight within yourself, dear one,
And with others,

Causing the world to weep
On too many fine days.

God wants to manhandle us,
Lock us inside of a tiny room with Himself
And practice His dropkick.

The Beloved sometimes wants
To do us a great favor:

Hold us upside down
And shake all the nonsense out.

But when we hear
He is in such a “playful drunken mood”
Most everyone I know
Quickly packs their bags and hightails it
Out of town.

(Hafiz)

Carry the gospel with you

Posted in christian, Christianity, inspirational, religion, scripture by Mike on July 21, 2014

Gospel reading of the day:

Matthew 12:38-42

Some of the scribes and Pharisees said to Jesus, “Teacher, we wish to see a sign from you.” He said to them in reply, “An evil and unfaithful generation seeks a sign, but no sign will be given it except the sign of Jonah the prophet.

“Just as Jonah was in the belly of the whale three days and three nights, so will the Son of Man be in the heart of the earth three days and three nights. At the judgment, the men of Nineveh will arise with this generation and condemn it, because they repented at the preaching of Jonah; and there is something greater than Jonah here. At the judgment the queen of the south will arise with this generation and condemn it, because she came from the ends of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon; and there is something greater than Solomon here.”

Reflection on the gospel reading: The scribes and pharisees come to Jesus to ask him for a sign. Of course, Jesus has been giving signs since the start of his ministry, and the people who followed him have understood something new and amazing was here. When they asked him to heal them, they approached him with faith, not asking for a proof but an intervention. These scribes and pharisees approach him in doubt, demanding evidence and not asking for regeneration. Jesus responds to them saying they will receive no sign but the sign of Jonah, who spent three days in the belly of a whale. Jesus uses Jonah’s experience as an allegory of his own burial in the tomb and his resurrection on the third day. In other words, the sign that these pharisees and scribes will receive is Jesus’ resurrection. But as Jesus says in his parable about Lazarus, they will not believe even if someone were to return from the dead.

Saint of the day: Born in 1324 at Fossano in Piedmont, Blessed Oddino Barrotti returned to his native city after his ordination to the priesthood, and for a time served as pastor of the Church of St John the Baptist. From the beginning he devoted himself completely to the care of his flock, hardly taking any rest, fasting rigorously at the same time, and giving to the poor almost every penny that he received. The bishop of Turin, to which diocese Father Barrotti belonged, found it necessary to warn him against overdoing it. “Keep at least enough of your income,” the bishop counseled him, “so you can have a decent living.”

FranciscanA few years later the young priest was chosen provost of the collegiate church in Fossano, but in his humility, he resigned this office to become the chaplain of a confraternity. It was at this time that he became a member of the Third Order of St Francis. He then converted his own house into a shelter for the homeless. He was made director of the Guild of the Cross, an association whose members cared for the sick and for pilgrims. In this capacity he succeeded in having a hospital built at Fossano for the sick, as well as a hospice for pilgrims. Father Barrotti himself made many pilgrimages, especially to the churches of Rome and the shrine of Our lady of Loreto.

Four years before his death, he yielded to the urgent request of the canons and once more accepted the post of provost or director of the collegiate chapter in Fossano, and with it the duties of a pastor. And when the city was visited by a plague in 1400, the holy pastor cared for the sick with such indefatigable zeal that he too was stricken by the disease and died a martyr of charity at the age of seventy-six. He was beatified in 1808.

Spiritual reading: The great affair, the love affair with life, is to live as variously as possible, to groom one’s curiosity like a high-spirited thoroughbred, climb aboard, and gallop over the thick, sun-struck hills every day. Where there is no risk, the emotional terrain is flat and unyielding, and, despite all its dimensions, valleys, pinnacles, and detour, life will seem to have none of its magnificent geography, only a length. It began in mystery, and it will end in mystery, but what a savage and beautiful country lies in between. (Dine Ackerman)

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